Water-Resources Engineering / Edition 2

Water-Resources Engineering / Edition 2

by David A. Chin
     
 

ISBN-10: 0131481924

ISBN-13: 9780131481923

Pub. Date: 04/03/2006

Publisher: Prentice Hall

Water-Resources Engineering provides readers with a complete picture of water resources engineering by integrating the fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics, hydraulics, hydrology, and contaminant fate and transport processes in the hydrologic cycle. The material in the book is presented from first principles, is relevant to the practice of water resources…  See more details below

Overview

Water-Resources Engineering provides readers with a complete picture of water resources engineering by integrating the fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics, hydraulics, hydrology, and contaminant fate and transport processes in the hydrologic cycle. The material in the book is presented from first principles, is relevant to the practice of water resources engineering, and is reinforced by detailed presentations of design applications. Containss practical design applications from the areas of hydraulics, surface water and ground water hydrology, and hydrologic fate and transport processes.

Features:

  • Contains practical design applications from the areas of hydraulics, surface water and ground water hydrology, and hydrologic fate and transport processes. Coverage of design applications reinforces the basic theory. Design methods are state-of-the-art, preparing students for engineering practice. Detailed coverage of hydraulics, hydrology, and contaminant transport in a single text provides a holistic view of water-resources engineering.
  • Presents computer models that are widely used in practice to implement the techniques discussed. It is essential that today's engineers be familiar with state-of-the-art computer models for efficient and comprehensive engineering design.
  • Presents design protocols that are consistent with ASCE, WEF, and AWWA Manuals of Practice. Codes and design standards guide most modern designs. Familiarity with these rules is essential.
  • Uses SI units throughout. To be competitive in a global environment the use of SI units is essential. The United States is moving inexorably towards the universal adoption of SI units.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780131481923
Publisher:
Prentice Hall
Publication date:
04/03/2006
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
976
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 9.90(h) x 1.40(d)

Table of Contents

Prefacexiii
1Introduction1
1.1Water-Resources Engineering1
1.2The Hydrologic Cycle3
1.3Design of Water-Resource Systems5
1.3.1Water-Control Systems6
1.3.2Water-Use Systems7
1.4About This Book7
2Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics9
2.1Introduction9
2.2Physical Properties of Water9
2.3Fluid Statics16
2.3.1Pressure Distribution in Static Fluids16
2.3.2Pressure Measurements19
2.3.3Hydrostatic Forces on Plane Surfaces22
2.3.4Hydrostatic Forces on Curved Surfaces26
2.4Fluid Kinematics32
2.4.1Turbulence33
2.4.2Reynolds Transport Theorem34
2.5Fluid Dynamics35
2.5.1Conservation of Mass35
2.5.2Conservation of Momentum36
2.5.3Conservation of Energy51
2.6Dimensional Analysis and Similitude53
Summary59
Problems59
3Flow in Closed Conduits65
3.1Introduction65
3.2Single Pipelines65
3.2.1Continuity Equation65
3.2.2Momentum Equation67
3.2.3Energy Equation80
3.3Multiple Pipelines93
3.3.1Nodal Method94
3.3.2Loop Method97
3.4Pumps101
3.4.1Affinity Laws105
3.4.2Operating Point107
3.4.3Limits on Pump Location111
3.4.4Multiple-Pump Systems114
3.5Design of Water Distribution Systems116
3.5.1Components of a Distribution System116
3.5.2Water Demand117
3.5.3Pipelines127
3.5.4Operating Criteria for Water-Distribution Systems128
3.5.5Network Analysis132
Summary133
Problems133
4Flow in Open Channels138
4.1Introduction138
4.2Basic Principles138
4.2.1Continuity Equation139
4.2.2Momentum Equation139
4.2.3Energy Equation151
4.3Water Surface Profiles161
4.3.1Profile Equation161
4.3.2Classification of Water-Surface Profiles163
4.3.3Hydraulic Jump167
4.3.4Computation of Water-Surface Profiles170
4.4Hydraulic Structures177
4.4.1Weirs177
4.4.2Parshall Flume187
4.4.3Gates191
4.4.4Culverts196
4.5Design of Open Channels204
4.5.1Basic Principles205
4.5.2Lined Channels208
4.5.3Unlined Channels212
4.5.4Grass-Lined Channels219
4.6Design of Sanitary-Sewer Systems224
4.6.1Design Flows224
4.6.2Hydraulics of Sewers227
4.6.3Sewer-Pipe Material230
4.6.4System Layout230
4.6.5Sulfide Generation234
4.6.6Design Computations236
4.7Computer Models242
Summary243
Problems244
5Probability and Statistics in Water-Resources Engineering250
5.1Introduction250
5.2Probability Distributions251
5.2.1Discrete Probability Distributions251
5.2.2Continuous Probability Distributions252
5.2.3Mathematical Expectation and Moments253
5.2.4Return Period257
5.2.5Common Probability Functions258
5.3Analysis of Hydrologic Data279
5.3.1Estimation of Population Distribution279
5.3.2Estimation of Population Parameters285
5.3.3Frequency Analysis288
5.4Floods294
Summary295
Problems295
6Surface-Water Hydrology299
6.1Introduction299
6.2Rainfall299
6.2.1Local Rainfall300
6.2.2Spatially Averaged Rainfall310
6.2.3Design Rainfall312
6.3Rainfall Abstractions323
6.3.1Interception323
6.3.2Depression Storage325
6.3.3Infiltration326
6.3.4Rainfall Excess on Composite Areas345
6.4Runoff Models348
6.4.1Time of Concentration349
6.4.2Peak-Runoff Models359
6.4.3Continuous-Runoff Models365
6.5Routing Models387
6.5.1Hydrologic Routing387
6.5.2Hydraulic Routing394
6.6Water Quality Models396
6.6.1USGS Model397
6.6.2EPA Model399
6.7Design of Stormwater Management Systems400
6.7.1Minor System401
6.7.2Runoff Controls415
6.7.3Major System436
6.8Evapotranspiration436
6.8.1The Penman-Monteith Equation438
6.8.2Evaporation Pans447
6.9Computer Models448
Summary449
Problems450
7Ground-Water Hydrology459
7.1Introduction459
7.2Basic Equations of Ground-Water Flow464
7.2.1Darcy's Law464
7.2.2General Flow Equation476
7.2.3Two-Dimensional Approximations481
7.3Solutions of the Ground-Water Flow Equation493
7.3.1Steady Uniform Flow in a Confined Aquifer493
7.3.2Steady Uniform Flow in an Unconfined Aquifer494
7.3.3Steady Unconfined Flow Between Two Reservoirs495
7.3.4Steady Flow to a Well in a Confined Aquifer498
7.3.5Steady Flow to a Well in an Unconfined Aquifer501
7.3.6Steady Flow to a Well in a Leaky Confined Aquifer504
7.3.7Steady Flow to a Well in an Unconfined Aquifer with Recharge509
7.3.8Unsteady Flow to a Well in a Confined Aquifer511
7.3.9Unsteady Flow to a Well in an Unconfined Aquifer517
7.3.10Unsteady Flow to a Well in a Leaky Confined Aquifer519
7.3.11Partially Penetrating Wells522
7.4Principle of Superposition525
7.4.1Multiple Wells525
7.4.2Well in Uniform Flow528
7.5Method of Images530
7.5.1Constant-Head Boundary530
7.5.2Impermeable Boundary533
7.5.3Other Applications536
7.6Saltwater Intrusion536
7.7Ground-Water Flow in the Unsaturated Zone541
7.8Engineered Systems545
7.8.1Design of Wellfields545
7.8.2Design of Water-Supply Wells547
7.8.3Wellhead Protection559
7.8.4Design of Aquifer Pumping Tests563
7.8.5Slug Test568
7.8.6Design of Exfiltration Trenches572
7.9Computer Models576
Summary577
Problems578
8Hydrologic Fate and Transport Processes585
8.1Introduction585
8.2Water Quality585
8.2.1Measures of Water Quality586
8.2.2Water-Quality Standards593
8.3Fate and Transport Processes597
8.4Rivers and Streams601
8.4.1Initial Mixing602
8.4.2Longitudinal Dispersion608
8.4.3Spills611
8.4.4Oxygen-Sag Model618
8.5Lakes627
8.5.1Near-Shore Mixing Model628
8.5.2Eutrophication630
8.5.3Thermal Stratification634
8.5.4Completely Mixed Model635
8.6Ocean Discharges639
8.6.1Near-Field Mixing640
8.6.2Far-Field Mixing648
8.7Ground Water653
8.7.1Dispersion Models655
8.7.2Transport Processes661
8.7.3Fate Processes668
8.7.4Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids676
8.8Computer Models678
Summary680
Problems681
Appendices
AUnits and Conversion Factors687
A.1Units687
A.2Conversion Factors688
BFluid Properties691
B.1Water691
B.2Organic Compounds Found in Contaminated Water692
CGeometric Properties of Plane Surfaces693
DStatistical Tables695
D.1Areas Under Standard Normal Curve695
D.2Critical Values of the Chi-Square Distribution697
D.3Critical Values for the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test Statistic698
ESpecial Functions699
E.1Error Function699
E.2Gamma Function700
FBessel Functions701
F.1Definition701
F.2Evaluation of Bessel Functions701
F.2.1Bessel Function of the First Kind of Order n702
F.2.2Bessel Function of the Second Kind of Order n702
F.2.3Modified Bessel Function of the First Kind of Order n702
F.2.4Modified Bessel Function of the Second Kind of Order n702
F.3Tabulated Bessel Functions703
F.3.1I[subscript 0](x), K[subscript 0](x), I[subscript 1](x), and K[subscript 1](x)703
GDrinking-Water Standards707
G.1Primary Drinking-Water Standards707
G.2Secondary Drinking-Water Standards709
Bibliography711
Index733

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