Water Wars

( 234 )

Overview

Would you risk everything for someone you just met?

What if he had a secret worth killing for?

Welcome to a future where water is more precious than oil or gold...

Hundreds of millions of people have already died, and millions more will soon fall-victims of disease, hunger, and dehydration. It is a time of drought and war. The rivers have dried up, the polar caps have melted,...

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Overview

Would you risk everything for someone you just met?

What if he had a secret worth killing for?

Welcome to a future where water is more precious than oil or gold...

Hundreds of millions of people have already died, and millions more will soon fall-victims of disease, hunger, and dehydration. It is a time of drought and war. The rivers have dried up, the polar caps have melted, and drinkable water is now in the hands of the powerful few. There are fines for wasting it and prison sentences for exceeding the quotas.

But Kai didn't seem to care about any of this. He stood in the open road drinking water from a plastic cup, then spilled the remaining drops into the dirt. He didn't go to school, and he traveled with armed guards. Kai claimed he knew a secret-something the government is keeping from us...

And then he was gone. Vanished in the middle of the night. Was he kidnapped? Did he flee? Is he alive or dead? There are no clues, only questions. And no one can guess the lengths to which they will go to keep him silent. We have to find him-and the truth-before it is too late for all of us.

"Let us pray that the world which Cameron Stracher has invented in The Water Wars is testament solely to his pure, wild, and brilliant imagination, and not his ability to see the future. I was parched just reading it." -Laurie David, Academy Award—winning producer of An Inconvenient Truth and author of The Down to Earth Guide to Global Warming

"A gripping environmental thriller with a too-real message." - Howard Gordon, executive producer of 24 and author of Gideon's War

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Adult author Stracher (The Laws of Return) offers a bleak picture of the future in his first YA novel: fresh water has become a scarce commodity, with most people relying on meager rations of desalinated ocean water distributed by the government. Nations war over extant supplies, pirates thrive, black markets flourish, and desalination companies wield immense influence. Vera and her older brother, Will, have never known anything else. Then they met Kai, the enigmatic son of a water driller, who lives a life of paranoid luxury by comparison. When Kai is kidnapped, Will and Vera embark on a quest to rescue him, going through a series of adventures that take them far from home. Battling pirates, escaping ecoterrorists, and plunging to the heart of a corrupt conspiracy, they learn more about their world than they ever expected, including why Kai is of vital importance. Though characterizations can feel thin and some elements are hard to swallow, it's clear that Stracher has put much thought into the effects of cataclysmic water shortages. His fast-paced, nonstop thriller doesn't hold back in its portrayal of a parched, desperate world. Ages 12–up. (Jan.)
Howard Gordon
"THE WATER WARS is a gripping environmental thriller with a too-real message. Cameron Stracher tells a story with quick pacing, compelling characters and a vision of a frightening future." - Howard Gordon, Executive Producer, '24,' and author of Gideon's War (forthcoming 2011).
Laurie David
"Let us pray that the world which Cameron Stracher has invented in THE WATER WARS is testament solely to his pure, wild, and brilliant imagination, and not his ability to see the future. I was parched just reading it." -- Laurie David, academy award winning producer of An Inconvenient Truth, and author of The Down to Earth Guide to Global Warming
Justin Cronin
In the tradition of THE HUNGER GAMES, Cameron Stracher's WATER WARS is both a trenchant cautionary tale of a world drained of its most precious resource and a rousing adventure-story of the plucky young heroes who set out to save it. Perfect for young readers-but with more than enough substance for mom and dad as well.
--Justin Cronin, author of THE PASSAGE
From the Publisher
"THE WATER WARS is a gripping environmental thriller with a too-real message. Cameron Stracher tells a story with quick pacing, compelling characters and a vision of a frightening future." - Howard Gordon, Executive Producer, '24,' and author of Gideon's War (forthcoming 2011)

"Let us pray that the world which Cameron Stracher has invented in THE WATER WARS is testament solely to his pure, wild, and brilliant imagination, and not his ability to see the future. I was parched just reading it." - Laurie David, academy award winning producer of An Inconvenient Truth, and author of The Down to Earth Guide to Global Warming

"In the tradition of THE HUNGER GAMES, Cameron Stracher's WATER WARS is both a trenchant cautionary tale of a world drained of its most precious resource and a rousing adventure-story of the plucky young heroes who set out to save it. Perfect for young readers-but with more than enough substance for mom and dad as well." - Justin Cronin, author of THE PASSAGE

"Adult author Stracher (The Laws of Return) offers a bleak picture of the future in his first YA novel... It's clear that Stracher has put much thought into the effects of cataclysmic water shortages. His fast-paced, nonstop thriller doesn't hold back in its portrayal of a parched, desperate world. " - Publishers Weekly

""Preble artfully combines contemporary characters with classic figures from Russian mythology to create the second installment in this intriguing series... After reading Haunted, those who missed Dreaming Anastasia will likely want to go back to the first book in the series so that they can spend more time in Preble's multi-dimensional world."— Kate Girard, RT" - RT

"Brilliant and terrifying, Stracher's water-desperate world will make readers re-think letting the water run before a shower or while brushing their teeth. As Will and Vera criss-cross this world, it becomes evident that Stracher has truly considered all of the different outcomes that a water shortage would have on a society. Stracher has created a large cast of characters with enormous skill that has each person standing out from the rest." - RT

"The thematic impact of The Water Wars was just as intense and disturbing, if not more so, than the Hunger Games novels. Readers of all ages should read this stark novel about greed and ignorance and apathy — a wonderful book to initiate discussions (in classrooms, between parents and their children, book clubs, etc.) about environmental stewardship and how the actions of one person can change the world for the better..." - Explorations: The Barnes & Noble SciFi & Fantasy Blog

"This fast-paced dystopian story paints a compelling picture of a world devoid of an adequate drinking supply, caught between warring governments and special-interest corporations. The characters are colorful and interesting, and in some respects, the scenario is frighteningly plausible... It is a recommended read that will make readers consider their own wastefulness of this precious resource." - VOYA (Voice of Youth Advocates)

"Heart Racing: If finishing The Hunger Games left a gaping hole in your life, Cameron Stracher's Water Wars aims to fill it. Set in a dystopian future where a lack of water trumps all else, this adventure tale will keep you turning pages far into the night." - Campus Circle Newspaper

"The action here will take your breath away, with chase scenes and double-crosses... Author Cameron Stracher's dark novel is a page-turner and I was up way past my bedtime reading it. It's easy to visualize the Armageddon-like landscape that Stracher describes, and it's all-too-easy to imagine the futuristic scenario that makes water so precious.

Go without food for three weeks and you'll lose a lot of weight. Go without water for three days and you'll die... Don't consider going without "The Water Wars" at all." - Detroit Lakes Tribune"Once you start reading The Water Wars, a simple glass of water becomes something special. The author has done a wonderful job of creating a bleak world, and he describes the dry, parched environment so well that I became thirsty just reading his words... The Water Wars is filled with nonstop action and it moves along at a breathless pace... The Water Wars is the kind of book I keep thinking about long after I've finished reading because it's based on a realistic scenario. And even though it deals with environmental issues and greed, it never felt preachy. It would be a great book for parents and teens to read together and discuss." - DaemonsBooks.com

""I know a river," says Kai. His words seem impossible yet tantalizing to Vera and her brother, Will, whose mother is slowly dying for lack of clean water. Shaped by severe drought, their civilization is caught in a power struggle among governments, and between governments and outsiders such as pirates and environmentalists. When Kai is kidnapped, Will and Vera begin a David-and-Goliath rescue mission that pits them and the allies they find against formidable, well-armed enemies. Set in a dismal future society,
this dystopian novel sets up a good premise... Once the plot gets in gear, the driving force is action... Readers who enjoy the adventure may also find some social and ecological food for thought along the way." - Booklist

""...a powerful message. I would recommend this novel for those who enjoy dystopian novels with a hint of sci-fi thrown into the mix." - Sacramento Book Review" - Sacramento Book Review

""The Water Wars is a thought-provoking dystopian thriller with a valuable message about the dangers of assuming that earth's resources are unlimited... With it's conservation message and ethical dilemmas, The Water Wars would provide interesting material for a middle school book report." - Story Snoops" - Story Snoops

""...leaves you really thinking about the world and just how valuable the little things we have are. I like that Stracher took something that we don't usually think about a lot, like water- and flipped it to make readers aware of just how valuable this natural resource is to us... a thrilling novel that shows us what could happen if an important resource becomes scarce." - Zoe's Book Reviews" - Zoe's Book Reviews

""The book moves in a fast-paced style and changes settings rapidly. It really takes you on an amazing odyssey." - Bookish Delights" - Bookish Delights

""Vera lives with her brother Will and her father in the Republic of Llinowa. This is in the future when water is more precious than silver and gold, and politics is all about water. Then one day Vera meets Kia, and he doesn't even seem to care about water at all. When Kia goes missing, her and Will go looking for him. During the journey they will encounter many obstacles and make many new friends. Will they discover Kia's secret and also a limitless supply of water?

"The Water Wars" is a futuristic book where the world has mostly dried out and water is the most expensive and precious thing of all. This is an outstanding novel by Cameron Stracher, unlike anything else I've read. It's quite unique and engrossing. I am eagerly awaiting Cameron Stracher's next novel." - Night Owl Reviews

""Fast-paced, suspenseful and nicely developed...I would definitely read more by Stracher and perhaps more books from the dystopian genre too." - Books and Literature for Teens" - Books and Literature for Teens

"The characters will reach readers, but it's the plot and action that will hold their attention as well as the descriptive writing that brings this bleak future world into the minds of those that pick up this book. Another good addition to those who love dystopian novels." - YA Books and More

"Cameron Stracher provides a strong cautionary tale based on the premise that in the near future the liquid wars will focus on water and not oil." - Midwest Book Review

VOYA - Julie Watkins
Vera and her family inhabit a desolate, parched world, where daily life centers on finding drinkable water. Warmer temperatures and rising sea levels have wreaked havoc on the planet, while the Canadians' decision to dam its rivers thrust lower North America into war and turmoil. Its inhabitants must now deal with chronic disease and permanent water shortages. Vera and her brother, Will, rely on each other to cope with not only with their harsh living circumstances but also their father's depression and mother's debilitating illness. When they befriend Kai, another teen, they are intrigued by his casual attitude and secretiveness about his obvious access to unspoiled water. Then he is kidnapped, with few clues and a bloody trail to follow. Vera and Will embark on a treacherous journey to save their friend and soon find themselves enmeshed in a dark underworld of greed and death, where water is the most valuable commodity and worth killing for. This fast-paced dystopian story paints a compelling picture of a world devoid of an adequate drinking supply, caught between warring governments and special-interest corporations. The characters are colorful and interesting, and in some respects, the scenario is frighteningly plausible. The novel's shortcoming is that at times the plot seems to jump awkwardly from one perilous situation to another instead of having a smoother transition. On the whole, though, it is a recommended read that will make readers consider their own wastefulness of this precious resource. Reviewer: Julie Watkins
ALAN Review - Kelly Gotkin
Vera lives in Illinowa, a republic located in America's former Midwest region. After years of wastefulness, countries battle to control what little fresh water remains on Earth. Vera lives with a constant thirst and no memories of what Earth was like when water was plentiful. She makes do with little water unquestioningly until she meets Kai, a boy who doesn't mind wasting water because he claims to know the location of a river that could end the world's drought. Vera remains wary of her new friend and his secrets, but when he and his father disappear, she's spurred to begin a life-or-death adventure to rescue them. Stracher's environmental rhetoric is heavy-handed, and he drives the plot with coincidences and helpful strangers. For environmentalist readers or those looking for a fast-paced adventure story, though, this novel provides a compelling enough plot to hold readers' attention all the way to the end. Reviewer: Kelly Gotkin
School Library Journal
Gr 7–10—In a futuristic world desperate for water, Vera and her older brother, Will, struggle to help their father eke out a meager living and care for their stricken mother. When Vera befriends Kai, a wealthy teen whose father is a wildcat water driller away for months at a time, he soon becomes a fixture at their home. After he fails to meet them one day, Vera and Will stumble upon evidence that he was abducted. Their search for their friend takes them far from their republic of Illinowa in what was the Midwestern United States through the republic of Minnesota and into Canada. Along the way, they are befriended by a band of pirates and taken hostage by a group of domestic terrorists. They eventually escape and track Kai and his father to Bluewater, the shadowy organization that has a monopoly on the water desalinization process and intends to exploit Kai's rare gift of divination. Stracher has created a realistic dystopian world ravaged by drought and taken from today's headlines as scientists warn of probable water shortages in the future. The fast-paced plot, nonstop action, and hopeful conclusion will appeal to teens, who likely won't mind that some of the minor characters are two-dimensional stereotypes. Others, such as the pirate leader Ulysses, are intriguing, fleshed-out characters who complement Stracher's likable sibling protagonists.—Leah J. Sparks, formerly at Bowie Public Library, MD
Kirkus Reviews

An unlikely premise isn't the weakest feature of this illogical, contrived and poorly blocked-out eco-thriller. In this devastated, Mad Max–style future, North America has devolved into warring, depopulated regions, and nearly all of the planet's fresh water has melted into the oceans, become polluted or is tightly controlled by tyrannical governments and corporations. Teenage Midwesterners Vera and Will trek through this blasted landscape to rescue their kidnapped friend, Kai. Despite having no idea who took Kai or where they went, Vera and Will stay tight on his trail thanks to fortuitously timed help from rough-cut but heart-of-gold Water Pirates, casually murderous terrorists and a remarkably well-armed freelance desalinator. After repeated miraculous escapes from captivity or death, Vera and Will are led straight to an offshore platform where Kai and his father are being held, overhear all the political and corporate kingpins discussing their plans and get away. In a bewildering denouement, they somehow liberate the world with a televised geyser that springs from an untapped aquifer that Kai has found using psychic abilities. Huh? The high body count may keep bottom feeders engaged.(Science fiction. 11-13)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402267598
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/15/2011
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 271,589
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Lexile: 750L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Cameron Stracher practices and teaches law. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine, and the Wall Street Journal, among other publications. He lives in Westport, CT, with his wife, two children, and two dogs, not necessarily in that order.

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Read an Excerpt

From Chapter 1

The year before he joined the Reclamation, when he was still seventeen, my brother Will set a new high score at the YouToo! booth at the gaming center. It was a record that stood for many years, and there were plenty of people who thought it would never be broken, although eventually it was. But by then my brother didn't care; he had found more important things to do than waste his time playing games in which winning only meant you had to play again.

We lived then in a time of drought and war. The great empires had fallen and been divided. The land was parched and starved for moisture, and the men who lived on it fought for every drop. Outside, the wind howled like something wounded. Inside, our skin flaked, and our eyes stung and burned. Our tongues were like thick snakes asleep in dark graves.

That's why I'll never forget the first time I saw Kai. He was standing in the open road drinking a glass of water like it didn't matter-water from an old plastene cup. There could have been anything in that cup: bacteria or a virus or any of the other poisons they taught about at school. Men had dug so deep for water that salt had leached into the wells, and unnamed diseases lived in what remained. But Kai didn't seem to care. He drank his water like it was the simplest thing in the world. I knew it was water because when he was finished, he did something extraordinary: he flipped the cup upside down and spilled the last remaining drops into the dust.

"Hey!" I called out to him. "You can't do that!"

He looked at me like he didn't know I was the only other person on the deserted road. He was about the same age as Will. Both had that lanky boy body I had just begun to recognize: hip bones and wrists, flat bellies and torsos. But while Will and I were dark-haired and lean, Kai was blond, with skin that glowed in the morning sun. I felt an urge to run my fingertips over his smooth forearms, feel the strange softness against my ragged nails that I never let grow long enough to paint like other girls did.

"Who says I can't?" he asked.

Wasting water was illegal. There were fines, and even prison sentences, for exceeding the quotas. But this boy looked like he didn't care about any of that.

"You just can't," I said.

"That's something a shaker would say."

"Because it's true."

"How do you know?"

"I know-that's all. Look around. Do you see any water here?"

"There's plenty of water," said the boy.

"Yeah, in the ocean."

"Can't drink salt water," he said, as if I didn't know.

I looked down the dusty road. Not a sign of life anywhere-just the hills, scarred from ancient fires, and sand blowing around the empty lot where I waited. Not even a lizard or an insect moved.

Once there had been a row of stores at the edge of the lot, but now all that remained were the skeletons that scavengers hadn't sold for scrap. Torn insulation and loose wire dangled like innards from pitted aluminum struts. When the wind blew, they made a sound like mourning.

"Why don't you have your screen, anyway?" A new student should at least bring a notebook to his first day, I thought.

"I don't go to school."

"Are you a harvester?"

"My father says I don't have to go to school."

Everyone went to school, except for water harvesters' kids who chased the clouds across the sky. At least until you were eighteen-then you got jobs, or joined the army, or worked for the Water Authority Board, which was like staying in school for life.

"You're lucky," I said.

"School's not so bad."

I liked school, although I wouldn't admit it. I loved learning the details about shiny rocks, their hard, encrusted surfaces yielding clues about the minerals inside. I loved our field trips to the dams, where metal wheels as large as entire houses turned slowly in their silicon beds. Best of all, I loved deciphering the swirling purple patterns of thunderstorms and hurricanes, trying to predict where, on the brown-gray prairie, they would strike next.

"Did they take you out?" I asked.

He shrugged. "Didn't need to go anymore."

I peered down the road again. The bus was late. It was often late. Sometimes it didn't come at all, and I had to walk back to my building, where my father would unplug the old car and drive me to the school in town. Will was already there, a full hour earlier, because he had to empty the basins before the sun evaporated the small amount of water that collected as dew. Last year two other girls rode the bus with me, but one day they stopped coming and never returned. It was boring waiting alone. I welcomed the distraction.

"I've got a brother," I said. "He passed his army physical."

"Easy."

"He had to do fifty pushups."

"I can do a hundred."

The boy kneeled like he was going to start exercising right there in the dust. The place where he had spilled his cup was completely dry; I couldn't even tell it had been wet. I could see the elastic band of his underwear and the smooth skin where his back was exposed. No marks, scratches, or scabs of any kind. My own hands looked like some kind of treasure map, except the lines didn't lead to riches.

"I'm Vera," I said to his back.

"Kai," he said, standing up.

"Where did you get the water?"

"I've got lots of water."

"Are you rich?"

"I guess so."

"Should you be out alone?"

"Ha!" he snorted. "I'd like to see them try something."

It wasn't clear whom he was talking about, but I didn't think Kai-or any boy-could stand up well to the bandits and soldiers who menaced our town, no matter how many pushups he could do.

"Are you waiting for someone?" I asked.

"Going to a scavenge site. Want to come?"

"I've got school."

"After school?"

I said I would try, but I knew my father wouldn't let me. He didn't want me going anywhere after school-not with this boy, not with any boy. It was dangerous to hang around strangers. Just last year there had been a virus, and three children in our class had died. No one went to school for two weeks afterward, and Will and I played cards in his bedroom until we got so bored that we wanted to scream.

"We live in the Wellington Pavilion," Kai said, naming a fancy housing complex. "Meet me there this afternoon. I'll tell the guards."

"I have water team."

"After water team, then."

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 234 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(67)

4 Star

(57)

3 Star

(63)

2 Star

(24)

1 Star

(23)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 234 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Cameron Stracher provides a strong cautionary tale

    The Water Wars devastated the United States which split into six nations in conflict with each other and Canada. The eco disaster is so great that Niagara Falls on both sides of the former boundary is bone dry. Children have become commodities to sell on the market as liquid finding slaves.

    In Illinowa, the government Water Board Authority, the most powerful agency, distributes desalinated water to citizens. The chemical cleansed liquid leads to disease as the mother of young Vera and Will seems to be dying from the toxin. The kids meet Kai who seems to have an endless supply of fresh water. He explains he gets his water from his dad who knows the location of an underground river. When someone kidnaps Kai and his father, Vera and Will search for their new friend.

    Cameron Stracher provides a strong cautionary tale based on the premise that in the near future the liquid wars will focus on water and not oil. The author's harsh environment in which the polar caps are gone is so vivid, readers will feel constantly thirsty. Violence is prolific as fights on grand and small scales are the norm; think in terms of the range wars of the late nineteenth century, but on a global scale. Although none of the three teens are fully developed as the Stracher world overwhelms the cast, young adult readers will appreciate this engaging thriller.

    Harriet Klausner

    40 out of 51 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2011

    Don't bother

    I was so dissapointed in this book. The writing is mediocre at best. There is almost no character development. I HATE not finishing a book I start so it took every ounce of strengh to finish this book. Then the ending just does nothing..I guess the author is hoping to make this a trilogy or something. I read this right after reading The Hunger Games so perhaps I was expecting to much from this story. I just can't get over how elementary the writing is. The idea of the story had potential..the author just couldn't deliver.

    15 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 5, 2011

    this book is proof that you can judge a book by it's cover...

    i had gotten this book at what i thought was a steal, $0.99--but in reality the book company stole from me. the only thing thats good about this book, is the cover. otherwise the book is rather dull. the entire time it felt like the author was rushing, and it was clear he was writing as fast as he could to make the deadline. i think the book could have really been good, but it was just too sloppy and confusing for my taste.

    12 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2013

    Boo

    Along comes harriet klausner wirh her cliff note book report. Please...bn, ban this poster....please and delete her plot spoiling posts. She takes pride in ruining every book she supposedly reviews by revealing every detail including the ending many times. Please do something about her.

    11 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2012

    Hello

    Dont get this book for nook it cost more than the actual book

    11 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2012

    Recommend

    I do think that some of the topics could have been elaborated further. Also, the ending was supper rushed. But, this was a heart breaking story with alot of action and cynical humor

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Good quick read!

    A good book with a well rounded story. Follows Vera and Will, a brother and sister, through a discovery that everything is not what it seems and that sometimes even the powers that be can't be trusted.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2012

    If you're in to The Hunger Games and a dystopian society without

    If you're in to The Hunger Games and a dystopian society without, I recommend reading this book. Sure the writing isn't necessarily intellectually oriented or the most complex out there but Stracher's universe is the respectable lovechild of Frank Herbert's Dune and Suzanne Collins' Hunger Games. Although one con I can say hindered the reading for me more than the lesser-developed writing was the fact that no major characters throughout the entire novel died, both adversary or hero. I hate to sound pessimistic here but in my opinion death is an important ingredient in character development at the right (and not always fortunate) time and this story severely lacks its presence. However, amidst minor frustrations, I cannot help to like the book as a whole and am not sorry for reading it.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2011

    It was okay

    I can usually finish a book in a few hours, but this one took almost two weeks. The book was pretty boring, but I forced myself to read it. I gave it three stars because it did have a semi interesting plot. If your interested in this book, borrow it from the library, don't buy it.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 10, 2011

    A Chilling Account of A Near Possible Future

    I loved this book. I thought that the charecters where strong and that this subject is one that very few venture near. Now i feel compeeled to conserve water. This book really made me think about bigger things thank you cameron Stacher

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2012

    Loved it!!!!

    I love the book it had action romance death murder pirates govenment people gifts rescues. It was truly a perfect book:)

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2012

    LOVED THIS BOOK SOOOOO MUCH!!!!!!!!!!!

    I loved this book it was really fast pace but i finished in like a day so its fast which is nice and did i mention i loved it

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Interesting Concept

    The Water Wars by Cameron Stracher is a dystopian novel set in the not so distant future. Many of the natural resources that we enjoy today have been depleted. The population is left to depend on the government for the means of survival. However some people hold out hope for a better future, some take it at the cost of others, and some are set to destroy it.


    I think the concept of this book is really interesting. We use water everyday for many different things but have you ever stopped to think what you would do if suddenly water wasn't available to us anymore. Things we take for granted such as showers, swimming pools and bubble baths would be but a distant memory. Cameron Stracher does a good job painting this scenario. There is definitely a message of conservation interwoven throughout this novel.


    The Water Wars is told through the eyes of Vera. She's a young teen who lives at home with her older brother, father and mother who is ill. Vera meets Kai one day while waiting for her school bus. Kai is different from anyone she has ever known. She knows from the beginning that there is something different about him. Vera and Kai become instant friends that are inseparable. One day Kai disappears. Vera is fearful of his life and immediately goes in search of him with her brother Will. Together the embark on a journey that leads them to uncover the truth that could change their future.


    Overall I thought this book was good. It definitely makes you think about all the water you consume and about your carbon footprint. The story line was a little slow in the beginning but about half way through it really picks up and it's full of action. I like Vera and Will. They were both really courageous. I also like the fact they were both just normal kids. This book is full of unique characters. I like the pirates in this book. They are an interesting addition to this novel. The Water Wars is a very interesting read that will have you on your toes.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    review taken from One Book At A Time

    knew when I accepted this book that it was getting overall mixed reviews. I wanted to read it any because I was really intrigued by the story line. I ended up liking it ok, but add my thoughts to the mixed bag.

    I really liked the idea of the world running out of water. The way everything is run seems very believable to me and not a life I would want. I thought it was interesting how the US has separated and how each area basically takes care of their own. The way the area that Vera's lives in was described really gave me a new appreciation for my cold glass of water and my hot bath.

    But sadly, I really didn't feel anything for the characters. I didn't dislike Vera at all, but I didn't really get her obsession with finding Kai. There friendship didn't feel developed enough to warrant that kind of devotion. Plus, the poor kids never seemed to catch a break. I felt like the constant danger was driving the story forward when it didn't have to be that way.

    In the end, I wasn't surprised that it was one greedy corporation that was causing all the problems and controlling everything. What I didn't understand was if there really was water hiding someplace or not. There seemed to be a piece of the story missing. Also, totally irrelevant to the story, but I found it almost laughable that it was the Canadians that were to blame. They caused all the environmental problems that caused the ice caps to melt and the water to go bad. And then they controlled all the precious little good water. For some reason, I just didn't buy that, so the rest of the story didn't flow right for me.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2011

    Just ok

    I liked the premise for the book but I feel that the characters were shallow.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2013

    NO PLOT SPOILERS

    Please harriet no more spoilers

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2012

    Not as bad as everyone is saying

    Opposed to what other comments have said, i enjoyed reading this book. The author had brilliant idea and took it into a full story, something most people cant do. I fell in love with the characters and felt every emotion they felt as the story progressed. An excellent book and i highly recommend it. You will want to expieriance what they went through, no matter how bad.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2012

    Very nice

    I really like this short story. It reminded me alot of The Twilight Zone and other shows. I look forward to reading more works from this author.
    Please keep up the incredible work.
    Thank you.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 30, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    "THE WATER WARS" (GMTA REVIEW)

    Book Title: "The Water Wars"
    Author: Cameron Stracher
    Published By: Sourcebooks
    Age Recommended: 12 +
    Reviewed By: Kitty Bullard
    Raven Rating: 5

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    Review: Lately dystopian novels have become extremely popular. With the fast rise of such titles as "Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins there has been an influx of young adult novelists trying their hand at creating post-apocalyptic worlds where the young truly become our future. Cameron Stracher has definitely created on such world and his heroes and heroines are unforgettable.

    This novel deals with a very real possibility that is at once scary and compelling. The structure of the land has changed, there is a stark dryness everywhere you look and water is not just scarce, but doled out in safely guarded increments. People are getting sick, and dying, others are disappearing and no one is safe. This is the world of Vera and her brother Will. When they meet a young man close to their age named Kai, they find his strange and it is hard for them to understand let along believe his flippancy where water is concerned. He seems completely uncaring that the liquid that gives life is hard to find. They share a fleeting friendship with him and when Kai disappears they decide they must find him. Embarking on a wild and dangerous adventure they learn a lot more than they bargained for.

    I loved this book and hope it is destined to become a series. This book reminded me much of "Hunger Games" but of course with its own quality and uniqueness. Stracher is definitely a writer well on his way to greatness, this is yet another dystopian success. I highly recommend "The Water Wars" it will leave you thirsting for more!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2011

    okay

    I thought this was a good book. It's not one of my favorites but it's pretty good.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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