Waterwise Plants for Sustainable Gardens: 200 Drought-Tolerant Choices for all Climates

Waterwise Plants for Sustainable Gardens: 200 Drought-Tolerant Choices for all Climates

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by Scott Ogden, Lauren Springer Ogden
     
 

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In recent years, gardeners have faced increased water-use restrictions, and it's not limited to dry-climate areas like the Southwest. There are restrictions in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina. And even for gardeners with no water restrictions, low-water plants are key to a sustainable garden.

Waterwise Plants for

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Overview

In recent years, gardeners have faced increased water-use restrictions, and it's not limited to dry-climate areas like the Southwest. There are restrictions in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina. And even for gardeners with no water restrictions, low-water plants are key to a sustainable garden.

Waterwise Plants for Sustainable Gardens is a practical guide to the best 200 plants guaranteed to thrive in low-water gardens. Plant entries provide the common and botanical name, the regions where the plant is best adapted, growth and care information, and notes on pests and disease. This practical and inspiring guide includes a variety of plants, from trees to succulents, perennials to bulbs, all selected for their wide adaptability and ornamental value. Companion plants, creative design ideas, and full color photography round out the text.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The first step in creating a successful garden is choosing the right plants. Fortunately, for anyone trying to grow things in an area that experiences drought conditions at least once a year (or anyone who just wants a more sustainable type of landscape that places less water demands on the local environment), there is a new guide in town. This husband-and-wife team of landscape designers (coauthors, Plant-Driven Design) offer gardeners a bounty of botanical possibilities, including trees, shrubs, ground covers, annuals, and perennials, that will survive and thrive in low-water gardens. Each concise plant entry includes gorgeous color photos of the plant, growth details, the zones in which the plant grows best, special attributes, and design ideas. VERDICT While this doesn't replace standard gardening references or regional resources, which offer more specifics on the actual process of designing and planting a garden, it is a terrific complement to the basic resources and would be a valuable addition to any library collection. New and veteran gardeners in USDA zones 3–10 will find this colorful guide an excellent resource when it comes to selecting suitable plants for a sustainable landscape.—John Charles, Scottsdale P.L., AZ

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781604693362
Publisher:
Timber Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/03/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
249
Sales rank:
806,153
File size:
41 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

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Meet the Author

Scott Ogden has prospected for new, garden-adaptable bulbs as well as proven, heirloom varieties in Texas (his home state), the South, Mexico, and beyond. As a horticulturist and designer he consults for and creates public and private gardens across the country. He lives in Fort Collins, Colorado.
Garden designers Scott Ogden and Lauren Springer Ogden lecture internationally, emphasizing plant diversity and ecological attunement. Their rich plant palette draws its inspiration from their studies of plants in the wild in the United States, Mexico, Argentina, Europe, and South Africa. They have spoken at most major botanic gardens, public gardens, and arboreta in the United States.

This husband-and-wife team's horticultural experience spans USDA zones 4-10. They have designed gardens and/or gardened professionally in Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming as well as England, Ireland, and Austria. Public projects include gardens at Naples Botanical Garden, Denver Botanic Gardens, Callaway Gardens, and San Antonio Botanical Gardens.

Scott and Lauren have written several books in which they pioneer new plants and garden aesthetics. Their latest book, Plant-Driven Design, takes a bold look at garden design from a plant perspective, marrying site, region, plants, and people while both embracing and transcending regionality. Other books include Garden Bulbs for the South (Timber Press 2007), Passionate Gardening (Fulcrum Publishing 2000), The Moonlit Garden (Taylor Publishing 1998), The Undaunted Garden (Fulcrum Publishing 1994), Waterwise Gardening (PrenticeHall 1994), and Gardening Success With Difficult Soils (Taylor Publishing 1992.)

The Ogdens and their work have been featured on several television shows and in numerous publications, including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Nature, Martha Stewart Living, Sunset, and Horticulture. Awards include two American Horticultural Society book awards and a landscape design award from the Association of Professional Landscape Designers.

Before making horticulture and garden design their life's work, Scott studied geology and paleontology at

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Waterwise Plants for Sustainable Gardens: 200 Drought-Tolerant Choices for all Climates 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
mrsinserra1 More than 1 year ago
I wanted to review this book because; well I have a black thumb. I am not very good at keeping green things alive (except an African violet I kept alive for three years and had to give away when we moved- but that was a fluke), especially if the plant needs regular watering when it is not rainy. I always figured the perfect thing for me to plant would be something that could pretty much live on its own but plants like that are hard to find. Even at garden stores and green houses the experts always tell me, "oh it's hardy, it could survive just fine" but let me tell you a deep dark secret, I once killed two hosta plants. I know, I have been told that is next to impossible, but I went on vacation for 3 weeks and when I got home, my beautiful little garden had two dead hostas. I was sad and mortified, especially since we lived in a cul-de-sac and everyone would comment when they walked by. This book is perfect. I am eager to plant some of these drought resistant plants when we get into our new house. I am already planning my garden. This book is quite thorough. It gives a couple different tables, one is a key to the different symbols used in the book and the other is zones, broken down by temperature. It then breaks the plants into varieties, such as trees, shrub, perennials, ground cover, grasses, bulbs, succulents, palms, and fiber plants. The descriptions are easy to read and quite complete. For each plant the book lists a "grows" section that explains how tall a plant gets and how quickly it grows, best zones for it to grow in, each plants special attributes, a couple design ideas, and a related plant in the same genre. Waterwise also has really beautiful pictures of the plants, and in most cases there is more than one picture of the plant and if the plant looks different during different seasons, like some trees, there are pictures of both seasonal looks. The wording is colorful, eye catching, and an easy to read font. It is also a pretty large font, which is nice on the eyes. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in what types of plants to plant in areas where you get occasional droughts. I know this book has been quite helpful to me, and I am a total novice. If you have any experience, this book will be a great resource for you to add to your collection. I received this book as an ARC. I do not get paid to review books; I do so in order to assist you in recognizing books that you might enjoy. Please read more of my reviews on my blog: sarahereads(dot)wordpress(dot)com