The Way Meat Loves Salt

Overview

Many years ago in Poland, there lived a rabbi who had a wife and three daughters. One day, the rabbi asks his children a powerful question: "How much do you love me?" His older daughters profess their love in gold and diamonds, but his youngest daughter, Mireleh, declares she loves her father the way meat loves salt. For this remark, she is banished from her father's home.

In this flavorful Jewish Cinderella tale, Mireleh's courageous journey is peppered with a perfect blend of ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $20.80   
  • New (3) from $103.02   
  • Used (4) from $20.80   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$103.02
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(203)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0805043845 New. Has the slightest of shelf wear (like you might see in a major bookstore chain). Looks like an interesting title! We provide domestic tracking upon request, ... provide personalized customer service and want you to have a great experience purchasing from us. 100% satisfaction guaranteed and thank you for your consideration. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$119.50
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(347)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$186.59
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(251)

Condition: New
Hardcover New 0805043845 New Condition *** Right Off the Shelf | Ships within 2 Business Days ~~~ Customer Service Is Our Top Priority! -Thank you for LOOKING: -)

Ships from: Geneva, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Many years ago in Poland, there lived a rabbi who had a wife and three daughters. One day, the rabbi asks his children a powerful question: "How much do you love me?" His older daughters profess their love in gold and diamonds, but his youngest daughter, Mireleh, declares she loves her father the way meat loves salt. For this remark, she is banished from her father's home.

In this flavorful Jewish Cinderella tale, Mireleh's courageous journey is peppered with a perfect blend of magic and romance, leading to a reconciliation with her beloved father. Lavishly illustrated in Louise August's bold linocuts, The Way Meat Loves Salt will make a wonderful gift for the Jewish holidays.

In this Eastern European Jewish variant of the Cinderella story, the youngest daughter of a rabbi is sent away from home in disgrace, but thanks to the help of the prophet Elijah, marries the son of a renowned scholar and is reunited with her family. Includes words and music to a traditional Yiddish wedding song.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Despite the subtitle, this is not strictly a Cinderella tale so much as a patchwork of two or three fairy tales, including Cinderella, brought to a Polish-Jewish setting. It begins as a variant on the tale in which a father asks each of his three daughters to declare how much she loves him; the older two answer in obvious ways "as much as diamonds"; "as much as gold and silver", but the third says, "I love you the way meat loves salt." The father here, a rabbi, misunderstands and exiles the youngest daughter, who, in this case, receives a magic stick from a stranger he turns out to be the prophet Elijah. She takes refuge in the house of a faraway rabbi with a handsome son. Add in a wedding in place of a ball and the story becomes Cinderella-ish, with the girl using the magic stick to conjure up a pretty dress, shoes and transportation. A missing slipper soon leads to the girl's own wedding with aforesaid handsome son. The wedding supper is prepared without salt, prompting sudden understanding from the bride's father. August endows the story with gorgeously colored linocuts as intimate and attractively homespun as for In the Month of Kislev written by Jaffe; like Jaffe, she can convey a warm ethnic tradition with her own sophisticated touches and discreet flair. But even with Jaffe's supple, classically cadenced prose, the seams show--the story is best for readers who want the Jewish backdrop. Ages 4-7. Sept.
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
When Mireleh, the youngest daughter, tells her father she loves him as meat loves salt, she is banished from her father's home. This begins her journey that tests her courage and resiliency. Eventually her father learns that she paid him a great compliment.
Children's Literature - Judy Katsh
A rabbi, asking his children to quantify their love for him, sets this Cinderella tale in motion. When his youngest daughter compares her love for her father to meat's love of salt, the learned man angers and banishes her. Her travels and troubles recall the familiar Cinderella tale complete with magical transformations, lost shoes, and royal suitors. The themes are universal; the characters' names and the ethnicity of the illustrations set this story firmly in the Old Country. In source notes, Ms. Jaffe gives credit to old Yiddish folktales, her seamstress great-grandmother, and all the storytellers and story listeners who have each added their unique flavors to the tale.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-Young readers will recognize Cinderella while adults will see the story of King Lear in this Yiddish tale. When a rabbi asks his three daughters how much they love him, the first two name diamonds and gold and silver and he is content. However, when Mireleh tells her father that she loves him "the way meat loves salt," he is horrified and banishes her from his home. Much like the protagonist in Charlotte Huck's Princess Furball Greenwillow, 1989, she makes her own way in the world, with the help of Elijah the Prophet, marrying a rabbi's son and inviting her family to the wedding banquet where the food is made tasteless from lack of salt. At last, the rabbi realizes how much his daughter loves him and the families are reunited to live happily ever after. This retelling is enriched by a clear introduction that shows the place of the story in literary tradition; by flowing language that will make it a fine read-aloud; and by linocut illustrations done in oil on rice paper, showing simple faces, embroidered clothing, and rustic homes. The words and music to the traditional Eastern European wedding song, "Mazel Tov," are appended. A fine addition to folktale collections, especially those where Cinderella variants or Eastern-European and Jewish tales are in demand.-Barbara Chatton, College of Education, University of Wyoming, Laramie
Horn Book
In this Yiddish variant of "Cinderella," which incorporates other tale-types as well, Mireleh, the youngest of three daughters, is dismissed by her father .a la King Lear when she declares she loves him "the way meat loves salt." This analogy sits unfavorably with her rabbi father, who likes his elder daughters' diamonds and gold better. Mireleh meets a kindly old man-Elijah, in fact-who gives her a magic stick. Tapping on the stick, she receives her first wish, and is transformed into a lovely maiden so that she may attend a wedding feast in Krakow. When the eligible young rabbi's son falls in love with Mireleh herself and they marry, she warns the cooks to put no salt in any of the food prepared for the feast. Her attending father exclaims that the food tastes terrible and, recognizing his daughter, understands her love for him. Illustrator Louise August renders the homey quality suggested in the title in the energetic peasant-like feel of her linocuts, whose bold black outlines furnish vitality. Vibrant oils of reds, yellows, and blues set off the inky black, which defines the trees and rocks, and the sashes on the women's provincial gowns. Both the writing and the art contribute to the abundant good spirit, captured in a final Mazel Tov!, the musical score for which is provided at the end.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805043846
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 9/28/1998
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 9 Years
  • Lexile: 580L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.58 (w) x 10.34 (h) x 0.41 (d)

Meet the Author

Nina Jaffe is the award-winning author of While Standing on One Foot: Puzzle Stories and Wisdom Tales from the Jewish Tradition, co-authored with Steve Zeitlin, as well as A Voice for the People: A Biography of Harold Courlander (both Holt). She lives in New York City with her family.

Louise August illustrated In the Month of Kislev: A Story of Hanukkah by Nina Jaffe, which was a Book-of-the-Month Club selection. A painter, printmaker, and muralist, Ms. August lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2004

    The Way Meat Loves Salt - A Remake of Moss Gown by William H. Hooks

    As I read the synopsis of the story I find the similarities with Moss Gown by William H. Hooks copyright 1987, uncanny. The manuscripts are truly identical with slight cultural variations. If you enjoyed this story, you will absolutely love Moss Gown, where the term 'I love you more than meat loves salt' originated.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)