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Overview

Considered by contemporary critics to be Trollope's greatest novel, The Way We Live Now is a satire of the literary world of nineteenth-century London and a bold indictment of the new power of speculative finance in English life. The story concerns Augustus Melmotte, a French swindler and scoundrel, and his daughter, to whom Felix Carbury, adored son of the authoress Lady Carbury, is induced to propose marriage for the sake of securing a fortune. Trollope's portrait of Lady Carbury, impetuous, unprincipled, and unswervingly devoted to her own self-promotion, is one of his finest satirical achievements. In his kaleidoscopic depiction of a society on the verge of moral bankruptcy, Trollope gives us life as it was lived more than a hundred years ago, while speaking eloquently to some of the governing obsessions of our own age.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The Way We Live Now is the essence of Trollope. If he had written no other novel, it would have ensured his immortality."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781551117560
  • Publisher: Broadview Press
  • Publication date: 5/9/2005
  • Series: Broadview Encore Editions Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 408
  • Product dimensions: 5.75 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author

ANTHONY TROLLOPE, the quintessential Victorian novelist whose dozens of books illuminate virtually every aspect of late nineteenth century England, was born in Russell Square, London, on April 24, 1815. He was the son of Thomas Anthony Trollope, a failed barrister. His mother, Frances Trollope, successfully turned to writing in order to improve their finances.

As a charity day student at Harrow School Trollope was shunned by boarders. Later as a student at Winchester College he was often flogged his older brother Tom. At the age of nineteen Trollope embarked on a career as a civil servant in London's General Post Office. In 1841 he was transferred to Ireland, where he lived happily for the next eighteen years, advancing steadily through the ranks of the postal service. In 1844 he married Rose Heseltine, who became a trusted literary assistant once he began to write.

The Macdermots of Ballycloran, Trollope's first book, was published in 1847. But it was not until 1855 that he achieved commercial success with The Warden, the initial volume in six-book series about clerical life in and around the fictional cathedral town of Barchester. Two sequels, Barchester Towers (1857) and Doctor Thorne (1858), quickly ensured his fame. The West Indies and the Spanish Main, the first of several travelogues Trollope recorded while journeying abroad on postal business, appeared in October 1859. The same year he returned to England and took up residence at Waltham House in Hertfordshire, some twelve miles from London. There Trollope settled into a disciplined routine that enabled his phenomenal productivity. He rose every morning at five o'clock and wrote for three to four hours in order to meet a self-imposed weekly quota of approximately forty pages; moreover he frequently began a new book the very day he completed one. The novelist's only passionate diversion was foxhunting.

Trollope quickly became part of London's literary life. His work began to appear serially in Cornhill Magazine, and he formed a great friendship with its editor, William Thackeray. He finished the last three volumes in the Barsetshire series—Framley Parsonage (1861), The Small House at Allington (1864), and The Last Chronicle of Barset (1867). Meanwhile, he launched the Palliser novels, a new series about politics, with Can You Forgive Her? (1865). At the time, Nathaniel Hawthorne perfectly pinpointed the secret of the Englishman—s appeal: 'The novels of Anthony Trollope [are] just as real as if some giant had hewn a great lump out of the earth and put it under a glass case, with all its inhabitants going about their daily business, and not suspecting that they were being made a show of. These books are just as English as a beef-steak . . . but still I should think that human nature would give them success anywhere.'

Trollope resigned from the postal service late in 1867, to become editor of Saint Paul's Magazine. The next year he made an unsuccessful bid for a seat in Parliament. In 1871 Trollope relinquished Waltham House and embarked on a two-year trip to Australia, New Zealand, and the United States. Upon returning to London he settled at 39 Montagu Square and soon published the engaging travel book Australia and New Zealand (1873). In later novels Trollope shifted his interest from scenes of provincial life to satires of English politics and society—among them The Claverings (1867), He Knew He Was Right (1869), The Way We Live Now (1875), and The American Senator (1877). The five remaining Palliser novels—Phineas Finn (1869), The Eustace Diamonds (1873), Phineas Redux (1874), The Prime Minister (1876), and The Duke's Children (1880)—also focused on political and social themes.

In the final years of his life Trollope traveled extensively. He journeyed to Ceylon and South Africa, and revisited both Ireland and Australia. He also turned out two biographies, Thackeray (1879) and The Life of Cicero (1880), and began writing his memoirs. Anthony Trollope died on December 6, 1882, a month after suffering a paralyzing stroke. The author's self-portrait, An Autobiography, appeared the following year. 'Trollope will remain one of the most trustworthy . . . of the writers who have helped the heart of man to know itself,' judged Henry James. 'His great, his inestimable merit was a complete appreciation of the usual.'

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Read an Excerpt

LET THE READER be introduced to Lady Carbury, upon whose character and doings much will depend of whatever interest these pages may have, as she sits at her writing-table in her own room in her own house in Welbeck Street. Lady Carbury spent many hours at her desk, and wrote many letters, -- wrote also very much besides letters. She spoke of herself in these days as a woman devoted to Literature, always spelling the word with a big L. Something of the nature of her devotion may be learned by the perusal of three letters which on this morning she had written with a quickly running hand. Lady Carbury was rapid in everything, and in nothing more rapid than in the writing of letters. Here is Letter No. 1; --

Thursday, Welbeck Street

DEAR FRIEND,
I have taken care that you shall have the early sheets of my two new volumes to-morrow, or Saturday at latest, so that you may, if so minded, give a poor struggler like myself a lift in your next week's paper. Do give a poor struggler a lift. You and I have so much in common, and I have ventured to flatter myself that we are really friends! I do not flatter you when I say, that not only would aid from you help me more than from any other quarter, but also that praise from you would gratify my vanity more than any other praise. I almost think you will like my ;Criminal Queens.' The sketch of Semiramis is at any rate spirited, though I had to twist it about a little to bring her in guilty. Cleopatra, of course, I have taken from Shakespeare. What a wench she was! I could not quite make Julia a queen; but it was impossible to pass over so piquant a character. You will recognise in the two or three ladies of the empirehow faithfully I have studied my Gibbon. Poor dear old Belisarius! I have done the best I could with Joanna, but I could not bring myself to care for her. In our days she would simply have gone to Broadmore. I hope you will not think that I have been too strong in my delineations of Henry VIII and his sinful but unfortunate Howard. I don't care a bit about Anne Boleyne. I am afraid that I have been tempted into too great length about the Italian Catherine; but in truth she has been my favourite. What a woman! What a devil! Pity that a second Dante could not have constructed for her a special hell. How one traces the effect of her training in the life of our Scotch Mary. I trust you will go with me in my view as to the Queen of Scots. Guilty! guilty always! Adultery, murder, treason, and all the rest of it. But recommended to mercy because she was royal. A queen bred, born and married, and with such other queens around her, how could she have escaped to be guilty? Marie Antoinette I have not quite acquitted. It would be uninteresting; -- perhaps untrue. I have accused her lovingly, and have kissed when I scourged. I trust the British public will not be angry because I do not whitewash Caroline, especially as I go along with them altogether in abusing her husband.

But I must not take up your time by sending you another book, though it gratifies me to think that I am writing what none but yourself will read. Do it yourself, like a dear man, and, as you are great, be merciful. Or rather, as you are a friend, be loving.

Yours gratefully and faithfully,----

--------------------------
MATILDA CARBURY
----------
After all how few women there are who can raise themselves above the quagmire of what we call love, and make themselves anything but playthings for men. Of almost all these royal and luxurious sinners it was the chief sin that in some phase of their lives they consented to be playthings without being wives. I have striven so hard to be proper; but when girls read everything, why should not an old woman write anything?

This letter was addressed to Nicholas Broune, Esq., the editor of the 'Morning Breakfast Table,' a daily newspaper of high character; and, as it was the longest, so was it considered to be the most important of the three. Mr. Broune was a man powerful in his profession, -- and he was fond of ladies. Lady Carbury in her letter had called herself an old woman, but she was satisfied to do so by a conviction that no one else regarded her in that light. Her age shall be no secret to the reader, though to her most intimate friends, even to Mr. Broune, it had never been divulged. She was forty-three, but carried her years so well, and had received such gifts from nature, that it was impossible to deny that she was still a beautiful woman. And she used her beauty not only to increase her influence, -- as is natural to women who are well-favoured, -- but also with a well-considered calculation that she could obtain material assistance in the procuring of bread and cheese, which was very necessary to her, by a prudent adaptation to her purposes of the good things with which providence had endowed her. She did not fall in love, she did not wilfully flirt, she did not commit herself; but she smiled and whispered, and made confidences, and looked out of her own eyes into men's eyes as though there might be some mysterious bond between her and them -- if only mysterious circumstances would permit it. But the end of all was to induce some one to do something which would cause a publisher to give her good payment for indifferent writing, or an editor to be lenient when, upon the merits of the case, he should have been severe. Among all her literary friends, Mr. Broune was the one on whom she most trusted; and Mr. Broune was fond of handsome women. It may be as well to give a short record of a scene which had taken place between Lady Carbury and her friend about a month before the writing of this letter which has been produced. She had wanted him to take a series of papers for the 'Morning Breakfast Table,' and to have them paid for at rate No. 1, whereas she suspected that he was rather doubtful as to their merit, and knew that, without special favour, she could not hope for remuneration above rate No. 2, or possibly even No. 3. So she had looked into his eyes, and had left her soft, plump hand for a moment in his. A man in such circumstances is so often awkward, not knowing with any accuracy when to do one thing and when another! Mr. Broune, in a moment of enthusiasm, had put his arm round Lady Carbury's waist and had kissed her. To say that Lady Carbury was angry, as most women would be angry if so treated, would be to give an unjust idea of her character. It was a little accident which really carried with it no injury, unless it should be the injury of leading to a rupture between herself and a valuable ally. No feeling of delicacy was shocked. What did it matter? No unpardonable insult had been offered; no harm had been done, if only the dear susceptible old donkey could be made at once to understand that that wasn't the way to go on!

Without a flutter, and without a blush, she escaped from his arm, and then made him an excellent little speech. 'Mr. Broune, how foolish, how wrong, how mistaken! Is it not so? Surely you do not wish to put an end to the friendship between us!'

'Put an end to our friendship, Lady Carbury! Oh, certainly not that.'

'Then why risk it by such an act? Think of my son and of my daughter, -- both grown up. Think of the past troubles of my life; -- so much suffered and so little deserved. No one knows them so well as you do. Think of my name, that has been so often slandered but never disgraced! Say that you are sorry, and it shall be forgotten.'

When a man has kissed a woman it goes against the grain with him to say the very next moment that he is sorry for what he has done. It is as much as to declare that the kiss had not answered his expectation. Mr. Broune could not do this, and perhaps Lady Carbury did not quite expect it. 'You know that for worlds I would not offend you,' he said. This sufficed. Lady Carbury again looked into his eyes, and a promise was given that the articles should be printed -- and with generous remuneration.

When the interview was over Lady Carbury regarded it as having been quite successful. Of course when struggles have to be made and hard work done, there will be little accidents. The lady who uses a street cab must encounter mud and dust which her richer neighbour, who has a private carriage, will escape. She would have preferred not to have been kissed; -- but what did it matter? With Mr. Broune the affair was more serious. 'Confound them all,' he said to himself as he left the house; 'no amount of experience enables a man to know them.' As he went away he almost thought that Lady Carbury had intended him to kiss her again, and he was almost angry with himself in that he had not done so. He had seen her three or four times since, but had not repeated the offence.

We will now go on to the other letters, both of which were addressed to the editors of other newspapers. The second was written to Mr. Booker, of the 'Literary Chronicle.' Mr. Booker was a hard-working professor of literature, by no means without talent, by no means without influence, and by no means without a conscience. But, from the nature of the struggles in which he had been engaged, by compromises which had gradually been driven upon him by the encroachment of brother authors on the one side and by the demands on the other of employers who looked only to their profits, he had fallen into a routine of work in which it was very difficult to be scrupulous, and almost impossible to maintain the delicacies of a literary conscience. He was now a bald-headed old man of sixty, with a large family of daughters, one of whom was a widow dependent on him with two little children. He had five hundred a year for editing the 'Literary Chronicle,' which, through his energy, had become a valuable property. He wrote for magazines, and brought out some book of his own almost annually. He kept his head above water, and was regarded by those who knew about him, but did not know him, as a successful man. He always kept up his spirits, and was able in literary circles to show that he could hold his own. But he was driven by the stress of circumstances to take such good things as came in his way, and could hardly afford to be independent. It must be confessed that literary scruple had long departed from his mind. Letter No. 2 was as follows; --

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Reading Group Guide

1. In 1873 the London Times praised The Way We Live Now as providing a "likeness of the face which society wears today." More recently Cynthia Ozick called the novel "very contemporary, despite its baronets and squires and rustics, and despite its penniless young women whose chief employment is husband seeking, and its penniless young lords whose chief employment is heiress-hunting. If all this sounds as far as possible from the way we live now, think again." Compare the world of Trollope's novel to our own. What are some similarities? Differences? Could this novel have been written today?

2. In his autobiography Trollope writes of The Way We Live Now: "I was instigated by what I conceived to be the commercial profligacy of the of the age." Discuss commercialism as taken up by Trollope, and its effect on society, from politics to morality to relations between the sexes to art.

3. Discuss the "great financier" Augustus Melmotte. How would you characterize him? What accounts for his rise and fall? Do you find him to be a compelling literary creation? What other characters in thenovel do you find interesting?

4. For the critic James Kincaid The Way We Live Now is concerned with "people's cynical admiration for successful dishonesty, their evasion of the tawdry moral realities underlying it for the sake of its surface glamour." Do you agree? Is this insight helpful in thinking about the meaning of the book?

5. What are some of the social institutions Trollope scrutinizes in this work? Do you agree with Kincaid's assessment, The Way We Live Now "comes closer than any of Trollope'sother novels to admitting the possibility that all existing social institutions may be obsolete and doomed, no longer having any real moral and economic foundations"?

6. Discuss the literary world taken by Trollope. How would you characterize the writing industry that Trollope portrays?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 28 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Madoff of the 1800's

    I decided to pick this book up again and re-read it in light of the financial disaster, possibly the biggest fraud in history, perpetrated by Bernie Madoff (not sure of first name). The story takes place in the mid 1800's London & surround...several titled, but money-less gentry are all pursuing the fabulously wealthy yet vulgar Melmotte and his marriage age (but unattractive) daughter. Throughout the novel there are murmurings of Melmotte's swindling and fraud committed throughout Europe but people choose to be blinded by his seemingly endless wealth. The story explores and elucidates the social mores (or lack thereof) of the Victorian times (a favorite literary time for me). We see how the landed folk are willing to pander themselves for a stab at becoming fabulously wealthy (no matter how that wealth was acquired)--they will stop at nothing to gain wealth without working (something they consider to be a dirty thing). There is also an American female character, Mrs. Hurtle, divorced and aggressive pioneer (or buccaneer woman) who is an interesting character acting as a foil to the gentle upper crust English ladies. Mrs. Hurtle represents the wild, untamed American frontier where anyone can start out poor and end up rich without regrets (although she would like to find a man and settle down to share her riches).

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 18, 2012

    A must read for all Trollope fans

    The thing I like most about Trollope's work is the way he creates his characters and TWWLN was no different. They felt real right from the beginning. Trollope likes to control his characters' revelations through his narratives. He writes interesting histories about them that tells you the type of people they are and what to expect from them. As for the story, it's an intricately woven tale of people running after power and money and fortune. BBC has a mini series on this book but to understand the magnitude of the author's skills, one must read the book. For new Trollope readers, I would recommend reading some of his lighter books before picking this up. It is long and involved but definitely not boring. If you are already a Trollope fan, this should be your next book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2012

    Errors

    The samizdat version reads as if edited by non english speaker
    Errors on every page
    Novel is astonishing but this version a disaster

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    epic

    900 pages went by more quickly than i could have thought possible....great storytelling, impressive characters, and beautiful language.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2010

    Darn Good Read

    Do not be put off by the thick Victorian presentation! This book, although written in an old-fashioned style due to its age, nonetheless grasps unsavory elements of human nature and the beginnings of characters we recognize all too well today.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 17, 2009

    The Way We Live Now Really Is How We Live Now

    I had to laugh at how accurate the dipictions of human psychology and society in this novel. History does seem to repeat itself to a certain extent, and this book has much resonance with our current culture of greed. Also a joy just to read for the wit, solid writing and perfect structure. As a book doctor who edits wannabe novelists, I recommend this as a great model of how to assemble material into a fine book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2013

    I like the Barnes & Noble classic NOOK BOOKS. I have the sam

    I like the Barnes & Noble classic NOOK BOOKS. I have the sample THE WAY WE LIVE NOW but I found it time consuming to find Page 1 of the novel. There were no page number listed with the chapters.
    However I do like all the information that precedes the story but I would like it at the end of the book. Sometimes I like to refer to the addendum as I read.
    Accessing this information was not easy. I have read many Jane
    Austen novels several times over the years so I enjoy reading the addendum. I will choose THE WAY WE LIVE NOW in a simpler format. Then if it is a "must read again" I will choose the classic edition.
    Since I haven't read the book yet I really can't rate it but it looks promising so I will say 3 star and get back to you when I have read it. Before this letter is accepted, I hope I may see it in it's entirety so that I can edit it
    . Wealthy 937

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