Ways of Seeing: The Scope and Limits of Visual Cognition

Ways of Seeing: The Scope and Limits of Visual Cognition

by Marc Jeannerod, Charles Heckscher, Michael Maccoby
     
 

An eminent philosopher and a world famous neuroscientist collaborate on the question of what it really means to see. A truly interdisciplinary book, it blends neurophysiology, electrophysiological studies, cognitive psychology, psychophysics, and the philosophy of mind, to create a valuable contribution to the field of cognitive science.See more details below

Overview

An eminent philosopher and a world famous neuroscientist collaborate on the question of what it really means to see. A truly interdisciplinary book, it blends neurophysiology, electrophysiological studies, cognitive psychology, psychophysics, and the philosophy of mind, to create a valuable contribution to the field of cognitive science.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198509219
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
12/11/2003
Series:
Oxford Cognitive Science Series
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 6.10(h) x 0.70(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Introduction: what is human visual cognition
Part I: The Purposes of Vision: Perceiving, Thinking and Acting
1. The representational theory of the visual mind
1.1. A teleosemantic account of visual percepts
1.2. Visual intentionalism, sense-data and disjunctivism
1.3. Conceptual content and nonconceptual content
1.4. Elements of cognitive dynamics
1.5. Actions and the intentionality of intentions
Part II: Empirical Evidence for the Duality of Visual Processing
2. Multiple pathways in the primate visual system
2.1. The where and the what: two visual systems
2.2. Two cortical visual systems
2.3. Neural mechanisms for object discrimination: the encoding of intrinsic object properties
2.4. Neural mechanisms for space perception: the encoding of spatial relationships in the posterior parietal lobe
2.5. Neural mechanisms for acting in space: the visuomotor functions of posterior parietal areas
2.6. Conclusion
3. Dissociations of visual functions by brain lesions in human patients
3.1. Introduction
3.2. Visual impairment following lesion of the primary visual cortex
3.3. Impairment in visual perception and recognition of objects following occipito-temporal lesion
3.4. Impairments in visually guided behaviour following lesions in the dorsal stream
3.5. Visuospatial disorders following lesions in the parietal lobes
4. The varieties of normal human visual processing
4.1. Pointing to an unperceived target
4.2. Temporal properties of perceptual and visuomotor processings
4.3. Time and awareness in perceptual and visuomotor tasks
4.4. Frames of reference
4.5. Do size-contrast illusions deceive pointing?
4.6. Do size-contrast illusions deceive grasping?
4.7. Disentangling the pictorial from the motoric role of annuli
4.8. The inerplay between perceptual judgement and visuomotor processing
4.9. Concluding remarks
Part III: Perceiving Objects and Grasping Them
5. Visual perception
5.1. Introduction
5.2. Visual perception, identification and recognition
5.3. The interaction of visual and non-visual knowledge
5.4. The scope and limits of visual knowledge
5.5. How intelligent are perceptual processes?
5.6. Is seeing believing?
5.7. The phenomenology of visual experience
6. Visuomotor representations
6.1. Introduction
6.2. Seeing affordances
6.3. Evidence for dual visual processing in primates
6.4. What is it like to see with a dorsal pathway?
6.5. The perceptual individuation of visual objects by location
6.6. The motoric encapsulation of visuomotor representations
6.7. Are there visuomotor representations at all?
6.8. The role of visuomotor representations in the human cognitive architecture
Part IV: The Perception of Action
7. Seeing humans act
7.1. Introduction
7.2. From grasping objects to manipulating tools
7.3. The primary level of visual processing of actions
7.4. Seeing object-oriented actions
7.5. The social perception system
Epilogue: the two visual systems revisited
1. The complexities of pragmatic processing
2. The contribution of the parietal lobes to human vision

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