We Are All Born Free: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Pictures

Overview

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 10, 1948. Compiled after the horrors of World War II, its purpose was to state and protect the rights of all people. This beautiful commemorative edition celebrates each declaration with an illustration by an internationally renowned artist or illustrator, including Jackie Morris, Satoshi Kitamura, Catherine Anholt and Laurence Anholt, Marie-Louise Gay, Jessica Souhami, Peter Sis, Mick Manning and Brita ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$17.05
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$19.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (26) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $11.99   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 10, 1948. Compiled after the horrors of World War II, its purpose was to state and protect the rights of all people. This beautiful commemorative edition celebrates each declaration with an illustration by an internationally renowned artist or illustrator, including Jackie Morris, Satoshi Kitamura, Catherine Anholt and Laurence Anholt, Marie-Louise Gay, Jessica Souhami, Peter Sis, Mick Manning and Brita Granström, Hong Song-Dam, and many others. A testament to freedom and the human spirit, it is a thoughtful gift for children and adults alike. With a foreword by John Boyne, author of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, and Doctor Who’s David Tennant, We Are All Born Free is published in association with Amnesty International, and all royalties will be donated to the organization.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

In time to mark the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in December, this attractive volume taps roughly 30 illustrators for visual interpretations of that document; the text is a simplified, child-friendly version from Amnesty International. Luminaries include Peter Sís, whose art is on the cover; John Burningham, who envisions Articles 1 and 2 ("We are all born free and equal.... These rights belong to everybody, whatever our differences") as a multiracial crew of smiling children bouncing on a trampoline, balloons floating into the distance; Jane Ray, who responds to Article 5, against torture, with a painting of a seemingly scarred rag doll, well patched but burned and spattered in red paint; and Chris Riddell, who injects a rare note of humor via a dragon that accidentally destroys the "proper order" called for in Article 28. The structure is cumbersome, as readers have to flip to back matter to learn who illustrated what, and the art tends to be literal-minded (children dancing around a statue of Nelson Mandela). Even so, the concepts emerge clearly, and adults searching for a way to introduce children to the complicated subject of human rights need look no further. Ages 6-up. (Oct.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
On the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, twenty-nine artists have illustrated the thirty articles on individual double pages in a version simplified for children by Amnesty International. The articles as written are basic, simple enough for the children to understand, and of utmost importance to all. They range from "We are all born free and equal… We should all be treated the same way." "These rights belong to everybody…" and "Nobody has any right to hurt us or to torture us…" from rights under the law, to rights to home, job, rest, and education, along with our duty to others. The artists are experienced international illustrators from all over the world. Their visions and media reflect personal interpretations. Some appeal to our sense of humor, while others draw us more directly into the meaning of the right itself. The artists include Peter Sis, John Burningham, Niki Daly, Korky Paul, Jane Ray, Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick, Jan Spivey Gilchrist, Ole Konnecke, Piet Grobler, Fernando Vilela, Polly Dunbar, Bob Graham, Alan Lee, Hong Sung Dam, Frane Lessac, Sybille Hein, Marie-Louise Gay, Jessica Souhami, Debi Gliori, Satoshi Kitamura, Gusti, Jackie Morris, Brita Granstrom, Gilles Rapaport, Nicholas Allan, Axel Scheffler, Chris Riddell. Marcia Williams, Catherine, and Laurence Anholt. Included are small photographs of and brief notes about almost all of the artists. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

Gr 2-6

Proclaimed by the United Nations on December 10, 1948, these rights apply to every child and adult throughout the world. Amnesty International has taken the 30 articles that comprise the Declaration and simplified them in such a way that they are clear to elementary school students. Each right is illustrated by an international array of well-known artists. Some of the pictures are downright cozy, such as Bob Graham's peacefully sleeping child surrounded by toys for Article 12, "Nobody should try to harm our good name." It is followed by Alan Lee's somber pen-and-ink drawing of folded paper cranes that have come to grief on a barbed-wire fence. The text of Article 13 reads: "We all have the right to go where we want in our own country and to travel abroad as we wish." Other artistic interpretations are provided by John Burningham, Niki Daly, Polly Dunbar, Jessica Souhami, and Satoshi Kitamura. This is an important book, best shared with children in a setting where discussion of both the rights and the illustrations is encouraged.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ

Kirkus Reviews

In this pro-bono album, a simplified version of the UN's Universal Declaration, as provided by Amnesty International, has been illustrated by an international cast of 30 artists, from South Africa's Niki Daly and South Korean Hong Sung Dam to Debi Gliori (Scotland), Jan Spivey Gilchrist (United States) and Bob Graham (Australia). Though Alan Lee and some other contributors offer somber or angry images—the spattered rag doll that Jane Ray has created for Article 5 ("Nobody has any right to hurt us or to torture us") may even disturb more sensitive viewers—in general the bright colors and smiling cartoon figures create an upbeat tone. Some images are downright perfect: Polly Dunbar contributes a spread of a little girl holding a flower and standing next to a spilled vase, flanked by enormous parental feet: "Nobody should be blamed for doing something until it is proved" (Article 11). Because each spread has a different look, this is better suited to page-by-page examination and discussion rather than a straight read-through. A photo gallery of the contributors caps this worthy, earnest collection. (Picture book. 8-11)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781845076504
  • Publisher: Frances Lincoln Children's Books
  • Publication date: 10/1/2008
  • Pages: 64
  • Sales rank: 539,932
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.98 (w) x 10.92 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2008

    Very Important Book

    I had been waiting for the release of this book and was so excited when I finally purchased it. I think that it is a must have for your child's library if you are interested in promoting your child's sense of awareness about important issue pertaining to basic human rights. The one thing I would note is that I don't think it necessarily 'speaks' to 5 year olds. I think you might have to simplify it a bit more for audiences that young. However, I think its appropriate for audiences as mature as teenagers and adults. The illustrations are really entertaining. I think they should be made into wall prints. I would reccomend this. Especially considering that all proceeds go to Amnesty International.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)