We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy

We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy

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by Maurice Sendak
     
 

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We are all in the dumps
For diamonds are thumps
The kittens are gone to St. Paul's!
The baby is bit
The moon's in a fit
And the houses are built
Without walls

Jack and Guy
Went out in the Rye
And they found a little boy
With one black eye
Come says Jack let's knock
Him on the head
No says Guy
Let's buy him some

Overview

We are all in the dumps
For diamonds are thumps
The kittens are gone to St. Paul's!
The baby is bit
The moon's in a fit
And the houses are built
Without walls

Jack and Guy
Went out in the Rye
And they found a little boy
With one black eye
Come says Jack let's knock
Him on the head
No says Guy
Let's buy him some bread
You buy one loaf
And I'll buy two
And we'll bring him up
As other folk do

Two traditional rhymes from Mother Goose, ingeniously joined and interpreted by Maurice Sendak.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062050144
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/01/1993
Series:
Michael di Capua Bks.
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
56
Sales rank:
734,116
Product dimensions:
10.90(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.

In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Ridgefield, Connecticut
Date of Birth:
June 10, 1928
Place of Birth:
Brooklyn, New York
Education:
Art Students' League

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We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago
Why these? Why did the author choose these two nursery rhythms? I really had to analyze this book to fully understand the just of what was really happening. By just reading the nursery rhyme themselves, I was lost, but by putting the words together with the illustrations and the balloon captions I was finally able to put it all together. For a picture book, I thought this was way too much work. I saw the rhythm of the words but I just didn’t care for these nursery rhymes, they were so sad and who will really remember them? It started off with poor children living in a dump and these rats snatched their kittens and a young boy. Jack & Guy, two boys from the dump, yell at them and they end up playing bridge with the winner walking home the kittens and the boy. The kids get duped and they lose and the rats haul off the prizes. This story is quite creepy and bizarre. It’s depressing and the facial expressions on the kids are heartbreaking. The bright moon is watching silently in the sky and in the second nursery rhythm he comes into play as now the baby is “bit” and the moon gets angry and grabs Jack and Guy and he drops them close to where they have taken their prized possessions. They find the boy and Jack wants to hit him. Yes, you heard me right, he wants to hit him. The two nursery rhythms do go together and they do have a happy ending, but it’s the things that happen in the rhythms. Strange and not something, I think I would share with younger children. This would be a good book to use if you’re doing a project on nursery rhythms. The rats were rather creepy and the kittens hanging by strings, the moon weeping, the kittens crying, and the baby being tied up. Each character was different, their distinctive feature so unique- I have to give the illustrator credit, they were a story themselves.