We Are the Weather Makers: The History of Climate Change

We Are the Weather Makers: The History of Climate Change

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by Tim Flannery
     
 

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We Are the Weather Makers tells the undeniable story of climate change with

explanations of the science behind global warming

worldwide reactions from industry and government

an assessment of the value of using renewable resources

a look to the future health of our planet

25 practical tips for living a greener lifestyle at home and in the community

Overview

We Are the Weather Makers tells the undeniable story of climate change with

explanations of the science behind global warming

worldwide reactions from industry and government

an assessment of the value of using renewable resources

a look to the future health of our planet

25 practical tips for living a greener lifestyle at home and in the community

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Denise Daley
A great deal of research went into detailing the history of climate change. Aptly titled, it provides in-depth information on global warming and how human activities are contributing to changes in the carbon cycle which is causing changes in the climate. The first part of the book is about earth and its carbon connections. This section has seven chapters that discuss the carbon cycle, greenhouse effect, fossil fuels, and other factors contributing to global warming. The eight chapters in the second section discuss endangered habitats and provide specific examples of how changes in the climate are adversely affecting the Antarctic and Arctic, the Great Barrier Reef, and others. Changing climates are causing ecosystem changes and this is leading to floods, droughts, and other extreme weather events, as well as animal extinctions. The final section is titled "What's to come?" and it ponders whether this dangerous climate pattern can be halted. The cost of political inaction is discussed and energy alternatives are explored. Each individual chapter ends with a "call to action" that offers readers practical ideas for making a difference both individually and globally. This informative and enlightening book urges readers to act on global warming by being good citizens and smart consumers. Reviewer: Denise Daley
VOYA - Caitlin Augusta
Sibert Award-winner Walker adapts this adult-market title for a teenage audience here, and the result is a thorough look at climate change for the discerning teen reader. Part one introduces the earth and its relationship with carbon, followed by a look at the effect of global warming on organisms and weather and an examination of the future of life on a warming earth. The book takes a strongly admonishing tone created with a mixture of statistics, logical reasoning, and emotional arguments. Interspersed throughout the book are twenty-five suggestions for readers to reduce their carbon footprints. Walker presents Flannery's compelling research in fluid, readable prose. Although the combination of strong writing and formidable research makes the book an excellent choice for most institutions, there are a few points to consider. This book proclaims itself an adaptation, but it is still a technical text that requires a solid understanding of physics, chemistry, and earth science to fully comprehend. Nor is it a browsing book; it works best when read through. Use, therefore, is a question to be considered in purchasing this rich yet complex book. It is an excellent resource for high school or college research projects on global warming or for students with an active interest. For others, something less dense such as Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth (Rodale/Viking, 2007/ VOYA June 2007) might fit the bill equally well. Reviewer: Caitlin Augusta
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—This adaptation of Flannery's 2005 adult publication shows the results of meticulous research and superb grounding in scientific facts. It lays out, in great detail, the ways in which humans have changed our weather and the possible outcomes for us and our planet if we continue as we are going. Clearly labeled illustrations accompany difficult concepts and greatly aid in understanding the sometimes-complicated climate models. Each chapter ends with a "Call to Action" describing how humans can make relatively simple changes in our lifestyle to reduce our impact on the planet. Yet, despite the many great aspects of this book, one issue clearly reduces its usefulness. The research and issues surrounding global warming are changing at an incredible pace and the adaptation presented here, while doing some updates, is not sufficiently current. For example, Chapter 22 covers the Kyoto Protocol, which, though mightily relevant in 2005, is being eclipsed by the upcoming Copenhagen (December 2009) conference, where the United States is poised to play a much more involved role. The Copenhagen Climate Conference is not mentioned. Some of the research on animals (harp seals, for example) that are endangered does not update past 2005. Additionally, the sections entitled "Call to Action" are often aimed at adults rather than teens. Not many teens will be weatherproofing their homes, checking water heaters, or buying new appliances—just yet anyway—and this disconnect is jarring.—Denise Schmidt, San Francisco Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
Arguing that climate change and global warming affect us all and that we can be part of the solution, this comprehensive look at the issue includes a clear explanation of the mechanism of the carbon cycle, the role of greenhouse gases on Earth, historical instances of climate change and their causes, descriptions of effects on a variety of habitats, future scenarios and suggestions-both personal and global-about what might be done. An adaptation for teen readers of Flannery's highly regarded and influential adult title (The Weather Makers, 2006), Walker's readable and convincing rewrite follows the original organization but tightens up the text, shortening chapters and addressing the intended readers with action suggestions between each chapter. It includes new research and four examples of institutions and groups whose actions have made a difference in greenhouse-gas emissions. Endnotes and an extensive bibliography support the argument. A copy belongs in every middle- and high-school library. (index) (Nonfiction. 14 & up)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763636562
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
10/13/2009
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
352,577
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.10(d)
Lexile:
1280L (what's this?)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Tim Flannery is an internationally acclaimed scientist, explorer, conservationist, and author. A contributor to the NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW and THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT, he is also a familiar voice on ABC Radio, NPR, and the BBC. He lives in Adelaide, Australia.

Sally M. Walker is the author of more than fifty nonfiction books, including SECRETS OF A CIVIL WAR SUBMARINE, winner of both the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award and the Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children, and WRITTEN IN BONE: BURIED LIVES OF JAMESTOWN AND COLONIAL MARYLAND. She lives in Dekalb, Illinois.

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We Are the Weather Makers: The History of Climate Change 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
WE ARE THE WEATHER MAKERS is a great book for pre-teens and teens to learn about our climate and how it is changing. Starting out with how the carbon cycle works and how to learn to offset your carbon footprint, to sustainable energy sources such as the sun and wind power - this book covers it all. If you want to teach your children to be responsible and help fix our ailing planet, then this book is for you. Filled with a lot of information and examples of ways that other kids have helped make a change, it is a great tool for either the classroom or at home.