We Got the Neutron Bomb: The Untold Story of L.A. Punk

We Got the Neutron Bomb: The Untold Story of L.A. Punk

by Marc Spitz, Brendan Mullen
     
 

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Taking us back to late ’70s and early ’80s Hollywood—pre-crack, pre-AIDS, pre-Reagan—We Got the Neutron Bomb re-creates word for word the rage, intensity, and anarchic glory of the Los Angeles punk scene, straight from the mouths of the scenesters, zinesters, groupies, filmmakers, and musicians who were there.

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Overview

Taking us back to late ’70s and early ’80s Hollywood—pre-crack, pre-AIDS, pre-Reagan—We Got the Neutron Bomb re-creates word for word the rage, intensity, and anarchic glory of the Los Angeles punk scene, straight from the mouths of the scenesters, zinesters, groupies, filmmakers, and musicians who were there.

“California was wide-open sex—no condoms, no birth control, no morality, no guilt.” —Kim Fowley

“The Runaways were rebels, all of us were. And a lot of people looked up to us. It helped a lot of kids who had very mediocre, uneventful, unhappy lives. It gave them something to hold on to.” —Cherie Currie

“The objective was to create something for our own personal satisfaction, because everything in our youthful and limited opinion sucked, and we knew better.” —John Doe

“The Masque was like Heaven and Hell all rolled into one. It was a bomb shelter, a basement. It was so amazing, such a dive ... but it was our dive.” —Hellin Killer

“At least fifty punks were living at the Canterbury. You’d walk into the courtyard and there’d be a dozen different punk songs all playing at the same time. It was an incredible environment.” —Belinda Carlisle

Assembled from exhaustive interviews, We Got the Neutron Bomb tells the authentically gritty stories of bands like the Runaways, the Germs, X, the Screamers, Black Flag, and the Circle Jerks—their rise, their fall, and their undeniable influence on the rock ’n’ roll of today.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
For years, West Coast punks have been ardently arguing for some much-deserved respect. Though the L.A. punk scene had a late start, it has turned out more relevant bands in the last two decades than the communities in New York and London combined. There's only been one roadblock in L.A.'s way until now, there hasn't been a book. Spitz, senior contributing writer at SPIN magazine, and Mullen, founder of the seminal Masque club that fostered many of the bands covered here, have fashioned a long-overdue oral history along the lines of Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain's Please Kill Me, Gotham punk's definitive history. Starting in 1971 with Jim Morrison and the glitter rock invasion and ending in 1981 with the Go-Go's commercial success, this book presents raw quotations from vital scenesters, promoters, and musicians. Readers will get glimpses into the formation and demise of acts like the Runaways, X, and the Circle Jerks. Much more thorough than Forming: The Early Days of L.A. Punk (LJ 11/1/99), this book not only titillates with insights and anecdotes that are alternately hilarious and grisly but also fills a gap in popular music history. Highly recommended for all libraries, especially those in the Golden State. Robert Morast, "Argus Daily Leader," Sioux Falls, SD Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307566249
Publisher:
Crown/Archetype
Publication date:
05/05/2010
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
721,564
File size:
7 MB

What People are saying about this

John Doe
The objective was to create something for our own personal satisfaction, because everything in our youthful and limited opinion sucked, and we knew better.
Cherie Currie
The Runaways were rebels, all of us were. And a lot of people looked up to us. It helped a lot of kids who had very mediocre, uneventful, unhappy lives. It gave them something to hold on to.
Belinda Carlisle
At least fifty punks were living at the Canterbury. You'd walk into the courtyard and there'd be a dozen different punk songs all playing at the same time. It was an incredible environment.
Legs McNeil
When Gillian McCain and I wrote Please Kill Me, a number of people asked us, 'What about the L.A. punk scene?' We said 'That's another book.' And now Marc Spitz and Brendan Mullen have finally written it. It's about time.
Hellin Killer
The Masque was like Heaven and Hell all rolled into one. It was a bomb shelter, a basement. It was so amazing, such a dive...but it was our dive.

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