We Should Be So Lucky

We Should Be So Lucky

by Kathy Levine
     
 

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The award-winning host of QVC Inc., America's premier televised shopping show, was always the overweight kid in class who could tell a good joke. Now, after more than a decade of TV fame, fifty million fans, and the New York Times bestseller It's Better to Laugh..., Kathy Levine is the one who's laughing.

Her message on how to cope after forty?

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Overview

The award-winning host of QVC Inc., America's premier televised shopping show, was always the overweight kid in class who could tell a good joke. Now, after more than a decade of TV fame, fifty million fans, and the New York Times bestseller It's Better to Laugh..., Kathy Levine is the one who's laughing.

Her message on how to cope after forty? "Try it, buy it, diet, but do it. Life is too short, so eat dessert first. Enjoy it — and don't regret anything."

Now Kathy brings us up to date on her personal life by telling all, and she means all, in a book that's as irresistible as an intimate diary accidentally left open to a juicy part.

Discover the naked truth about:

  • Love after forty...the date from hell, the romantic fling with a much younger man, the truly terrifying mistake — and more!
  • Those weighty ups and downs...including the hot skinny on the breakthrough diet program that changed Kathy's life.
  • Nips and tucks...did she have cosmetic surgery? Kathy supplies the bare facts.
  • Personal tragedy...the heartbreaking loss of the man who was her best friend.
  • QVC...behind the scenes. then and now. Kathy gives us the scoop on the secrets of QVC's success, Joan Rivers, viewer mail, and some brand-new developments.

WE SHOULD BE SO LUCKY

And we are — lucky that Kathy's here to make us laugh and fuel our dreams, just as we'd expect from our best girlfriend, a lady we all love.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Good Housekeeping Reading We Should Be So Lucky is like having a gabfest with an old friend.

Chicago Sun-Times Kathy Levine is sharp, likable, and a hoot.

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this amusing commentary on middle-age single life in the 1990s, Levine (It's Better to Laugh, coauthored with Scovell), a 40-something host on the QVC home shopping channel, delivers her thoughts on a variety of topics, including dieting, plastic surgery and the dating game. Readers will particularly enjoy her hilarious account of a singles restaurant night attended by 20 "great" women and six extremely boring men. Despite several setbacks (such as a chemical face peel that became infected and a duplicitous lover who made off with her $1800 loan), Levine maintains her optimism and ability to laugh at herself. She also describes her success with a physician-prescribed weight-loss pill and offers sensible advice on nutrition. She drops her relentlessly upbeat tone only in an affecting chapter on the death of her ex-husband, Jay Levine, from whom she had been divorced for 10 years. (Sept.)
Library Journal
The host of a popular cable TV shopping channel and author of the best-selling It's Better To Laugh... (Pocket, 1995) reflects on middle age.
Kirkus Reviews
A lively, outspoken commentary on life as a middle-aged, divorced mini-celebrity who fights fat, the dearth of acceptable men, and mortality. Levine is a successful product-pusher on QVC (the network that pioneered -your-couch), her viewers attracted by a straightforward approach to shopping and a "Jewish-mamma-of-the-'90s" presentation. The tone here is basically letters-to-my-new-best-friend, revealing all about her latest love affairs (successful and unsuccessful, serendipitous and planned, younger and older); her face-lift (yes, she had one, but it was small and unimportant, only an adjunct to a face peel, and QVC didn't order her to do it), her weight loss (with the help of the once-miraculous, now-controversial diet pill, "fen- phen"). Now, the reader should understand that Levine doesn't really approve of anti-aging surgery or obsession with weight. But something (a wish for another decade in television?) made her do it. Levine's talent as storyteller and coauthor Scovell's skill as a writer give enough punch to the material to make the manifold "oy vays" and other ethnic exclamation points unnecessary. The death of Levine's ex-husband, who had remained a loving friend, gives a sober note to the otherwise energetic tale. But the last chapter, unfortunately, is a plug for QVC. The reader has to be a really big fan to have a clue about the people she lauds or to care about the dress that she wore ten years ago when she helped launch the station. It is to laugh, yes; but, oy vay, it is also to despair of women who give priority to members of the opposite sex as simply romantic objects, to perfect bodies, and to mindless, endless shopping.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781451661903
Publisher:
Gallery Books
Publication date:
07/09/2011
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.70(d)

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