Wealth and Poverty: A New Edition for the Twenty-First Century

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Overview

Capitalism Endures

When George Gilder first published Wealth & Poverty in 1981, the book was an instant classic, becoming the economics bible of the unfolding Reagan revolution. “Not since the Gilded Age of the late 1800’s has anyone advanced so enthusiastic an endorsement of capitalism and capitalists,” observed the New York Times.

Now, amid the Obama administration’s redistributionist zeal, industrial planning schemes, vandalistic energy ...

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Wealth and Poverty: A New Edition for the Twenty-First Century

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Overview

Capitalism Endures

When George Gilder first published Wealth & Poverty in 1981, the book was an instant classic, becoming the economics bible of the unfolding Reagan revolution. “Not since the Gilded Age of the late 1800’s has anyone advanced so enthusiastic an endorsement of capitalism and capitalists,” observed the New York Times.

Now, amid the Obama administration’s redistributionist zeal, industrial planning schemes, vandalistic energy policies, demonization of wealth-creating entrepreneurs, and Keynesian spending programs, Gilder returns to the fray with an updated edition of his famous tome.

Thirty years after his paean to free enterprise shocked the Washington establishment, have the collapse of Enron, the economic meltdown of 2008, the advent of the Occupy Wall Street movement, and other events caused Gilder to reassess his devotion to capitalism? In a way, they have. As Gilder states in this edition, “It is clear that we, the original supply siders, bear some responsibility for the failure to persuade. All these years later, it has become clear that we were not radical enough.”

Dissatisfied with half-hearted defenses of capitalism as the least bad system available, Wealth & Poverty passionately extols the morality, compassion, and efficacy of free enterprise. Buoyed by the collapse of communism but disturbed by the return of socialism under new guises, Gilder argues in a new prologue and epilogue that the solution to America’s current economic troubles cannot be found in warmed-over socialism, but in the generosity and economic vitality that can only be unleashed by the free market.

As President Obama’s policies lend Gilder’s arguments a shocking new relevancy, Gilder reminds us why the New Yorker called him a “scourge of feminists, unrepentant supply-sider, and now…a technology prophet.” Featuring a new foreword by Steve Forbes, this edition of Wealth & Poverty informs us that free enterprise is the core of freedom—and that nations which forget or ignore that historical lesson will not and cannot prosper.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781470827663
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/21/2012
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Pages: 12
  • Sales rank: 835,106
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 5.80 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

George Gilder is a New York Times best-selling author, journalist, and preeminent economic thinker who is credited with helping develop the supply-side economic theory. He has served as Chairman of the Lehrman Institute's Economic Roundtable, was Program Director for the Manhattan Institute, and is also the co-founder of the Discovery Institute. Gilder is the author of many popular books including Wealth & Poverty and has written for the Wall Street Journal, National Review, Forbes, and more. Gilder lives with his wife in New York.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 4, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    If you are looking for a solid examination of the causes of pove

    If you are looking for a solid examination of the causes of poverty,the creation of wealth and the connection between the two then this book is not for you. However, if instead you want a book filled with soaring rhetoric, occasional information and a view of capitalism of such hopeless hyper-optimism that it would even make Pollyanna puke then this book is for you.

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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