Wealth and Welfare: An Economic and Social History of Britain 1851-1951

Overview

This collection of essays explores the questions of what counted as knowledge in Victorian Britain, who defined knowledge and the knowledgeable, by what means and by what criteria.

During the Victorian period, the structure of knowledge took on a new and recognizably modern form, and the disciplines that we now take for granted took shape. The ways in which knowledge was tested also took on a new form, with oral examinations and personal contacts giving way to formal written ...

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Overview

This collection of essays explores the questions of what counted as knowledge in Victorian Britain, who defined knowledge and the knowledgeable, by what means and by what criteria.

During the Victorian period, the structure of knowledge took on a new and recognizably modern form, and the disciplines that we now take for granted took shape. The ways in which knowledge was tested also took on a new form, with oral examinations and personal contacts giving way to formal written tests. New institutions of knowledge were created: museums were important at the start of the period (knowledge often meant classifying and collecting); by the end, universities had taken on a new promince. Knowledge expanded and Victorians needed to make sense of the sheer scale of information, to popularize it, and at the same time to exclude ignorance and error - a role carried out by encyclopedias and popular publications.

The concept of knowledge is complex and much debated, with a multiplicity of meanings and troubling relationships. By studying the Victorian organization of knowledge in its institutional settings, these essays contribute to our consideration of these wider issues.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Martin Daunton is Master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and President of the Royal Historical Society. He was formerly Professor of Economic History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Churchill College. He has written extensively on British history since 1700, especially on urban history and economic and social policy, and is the author of Progress and Poverty, which covers the period from 1700 to 1851 and is also published by Oxford University Press.

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Table of Contents


List of Figures     xi
List of Tables     xii
Acknowledgements     xvi
The Nation's Wealth and the People's Welfare     1
The Anatomy of the British Economy     29
Agriculture and the Land     31
Industry and the Urban Economy     76
The Service Economy     131
The Growth of the British Economy     166
Globalization and Deglobalization     199
Free Trade and Protectionism     201
Capital Exports     244
The Rise and Demise of the Gold Standard     274
Rebuilding the International Economic Order?     298
Poverty, Prosperity, and Population     321
Births and Marriages     323
Death and Disease     349
Rich and Poor     376
Cultures of Consumption     419
Public Policy and the State     457
Taxing and Spending     459
Education     488
From the Poor Law to the Welfare State     521
Managing the Economy     574
The Festival of Britain and British Identity     608
Index     621
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