The Wealth of Nations (Complete with active TOC with detailed links to each book & chapter) [NOOK Book]

Overview

• Table of contents with working links to chapters is included
• The book has been corrected for spelling and grammatical errors
• New and improved version


In that rude state of society, in which there is no division of labour, in which exchanges are seldom made, and in which every man provides every thing for himself, it is not necessary that any stock should be accumulated, or stored up before-hand, in order to carry on the business of the society. Every man endeavours to supply, by his own industry, his ...
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The Wealth of Nations (Complete with active TOC with detailed links to each book & chapter)

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Overview

• Table of contents with working links to chapters is included
• The book has been corrected for spelling and grammatical errors
• New and improved version


In that rude state of society, in which there is no division of labour, in which exchanges are seldom made, and in which every man provides every thing for himself, it is not necessary that any stock should be accumulated, or stored up before-hand, in order to carry on the business of the society. Every man endeavours to supply, by his own industry, his own occasional wants, as they occur. When he is hungry, he goes to the forest to hunt; when his coat is worn out, he clothes himself with the skin of the first large animal he kills: and when his hut begins to go to ruin, he repairs it, as well as he can, with the trees and the turf that are nearest it.

But when the division of labour has once been thoroughly introduced, the produce of a man's own labour can supply but a very small part of his occasional wants. The far greater part of them are supplied by the produce of other men's labour, which he purchases with the produce, or, what is the same thing, with the price of the produce, of his own. But this purchase cannot be made till such time as the produce of his own labour has not only been completed, but sold. A stock of goods of different kinds, therefore, must be stored up somewhere, sufficient to maintain him, and to supply him with the materials and tools of his work, till such time at least as both these events can be brought about. A weaver cannot apply himself entirely to his peculiar business, unless there is before-hand stored up somewhere, either in his own possession, or in that of some other person, a stock sufficient to maintain him, and to supply him with the materials and tools of his work, till he has not only completed, but sold his web. This accumulation must evidently be previous to his applying his industry for so long a time to such a peculiar business.

As the accumulation of stock must, in the nature of things, be previous to the division of labour, so labour can be more and more subdivided in proportion only as stock is previously more and more accumulated. The quantity of materials which the same number of people can work up, increases in a great proportion as labour comes to be more and more subdivided; and as the operations of each workman are gradually reduced to a greater degree of simplicity, a variety of new machines come to be invented for facilitating and abridging those operations. As the division of labour advances, therefore, in order to give constant employment to an equal number of workmen, an equal stock of provisions, and a greater stock of materials and tools than what would have been necessary in a ruder state of things, must be accumulated before-hand. But the number of workmen in every branch of business generally increases with the division of labour in that branch; or rather it is the increase of their number which enables them to class and subdivide themselves in this manner.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012934352
  • Publisher: Unforgotten Classics
  • Publication date: 6/6/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 82 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(31)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(19)

2 Star

(11)

1 Star

(6)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 77 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2011

    Missing several pages at the end!

    This ebook is missing several pages at the end.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2012

    Must read for historians

    A must read for historians who want to understand the distribution of wealth and economics during Americas early colonial years

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 13, 2012

    Read again

    Good to read American style common sense

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  • Posted September 15, 2011

    The book is so detailed it tends toward tedium.

    I have read the book in hard cover. I bought it as an eBook to help me decide if I like the Nook ebook format. It turned out that I didn't. Navigation is slow on my netbook and the tools are awkward. I also explored the Kindle eBook reader, an it was no better. I am convinced if I want to read ebooks, I have to buy a Nook or a Kindle.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 5, 2011

    gjv

    bjfv

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 2, 2011

    what. a page turner

    nice work

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted October 20, 2011

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