Weapons and Warfare: From the Stone Age to the Space Age

Overview

Thousands and thousands of years ago, Stone Age humans learned to make the first simple weapons — wooden clubs, spears, bows and arrows, and slings — to hunt for food. Today, we have bombs that could easily wipe the entire Stone Age population with one blow. Award-winning author Milton Meltzer takes readers on a highly selective journey through the evolution of weapons and warfare. In brief, accessible sketches, Meltzer traces the ingenious development of arms from hunting tools to tactical instruments for ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (16) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $27.60   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$27.60
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(841)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1996-11-30 Hardcover New NEW. NO remainder markings. A brand new book perfect inside and out. In a nice dj as well.

Ships from: Midland, VA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Thousands and thousands of years ago, Stone Age humans learned to make the first simple weapons — wooden clubs, spears, bows and arrows, and slings — to hunt for food. Today, we have bombs that could easily wipe the entire Stone Age population with one blow. Award-winning author Milton Meltzer takes readers on a highly selective journey through the evolution of weapons and warfare. In brief, accessible sketches, Meltzer traces the ingenious development of arms from hunting tools to tactical instruments for strategic offence and defense. The provocative, human-interest history will intrigue readers interested in — or concerned about — humanity's ongoing drive toward new methods of making weapons and war.

Highlights some weapons of war explaining how and why they were developed, various responses people have had to them, and the impact they have had upon society.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 6 UpA concise, tautly written, introductory survey of an ever-popular subject. In straightforward, seemingly effortless prose, Meltzer presents readers with essential facts and figures. The chronological approach is flexible enough to include mini-essays on topics such as "Do Women War?," "The Human Cost," and "The Profits of Death-Dealing." The author concludes with the statement, "We have become so used to this miserable state of affairs that many of us do not see how stupid, how irrational, how blind has been the mass behavior of humanity. How long will we continue to go along with such mad folly?" If the book can be faulted at all, it is for the sketchbooklike, black-and-white pencil drawings; they are well done, but lack the kind of detail that middle schoolers like to see. Therefore, this overview should be used in conjection with books like the Diagram Group's Weapons (St. Martin's Pr., 1991).David A. Lindsey, Lakewood High and Middle School Libraries, WA
Kirkus Reviews
Meltzer (Hold Your Horses!, 1995, etc.) presents a sobering overview of the tools and techniques of battle, from prehistoric times to the present, in an intelligent, direct, and necessarily brief style: The subject is so immense that he doesn't spend too much time on any particular topic.

The evidence is appropriately depressing: As far back as 10,000 b.c., people have been fighting each other. Diligent reportage on the technological development of weaponry is skillfully accompanied by Martinez's consummate charcoal illustrations that depict these weapons, famous battles, and warriors throughout history. The bloody trail that stretches from wooden clubs to thermonuclear bombs is full of horrors. The reasons for the origins of war are basic enough to grasp: Primitive man fought over lack of food or the possession of a mate. As the reasons for armed combat became more sophisticated, so did the weapons. Meltzer's discussion is more than just a rehashing, and readers will enjoy the intriguing connections the author makes, e.g., between modern ballistic missiles and ancient slingshots and stones. His recitation of statistics regarding current handgun sales within the US and his subsequent appeal to the basic humanity of young readers are the book's best lessons of all.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060248758
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/1/1996
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 96
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 1120L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.19 (w) x 9.31 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Meet the Author

Author Bio
Milton Meltzer, a Christopher Award and Jane Addams Children's Book Award winner, is the author of over eighty books in the fields of history, biography, and social reform. His most recent books are The Amazing Potato, a 1993 ALA Notable Children's Book, Gold and Hold Your Horses!. He lives in New York City.

Winner of the 2001 Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

How Did It Start?

Who makes war?

You could answer, who doesn't?

Making war has been one of humankind's chief activities for thousands of years. Combat probably first occurred when groups of men in the Old Stone Age (before 10,000 B.C.) used crude stone weapons to fight with other groups over food, women, or land.

Archeologists digging down into the layers of prehistoric communities in the Middle East have found evidence that New Stone Age people were waging war as far back as 7000 B.C.

As the population grew in the earliest human societies, the local supply of food diminished. People were forced to migrate in search of food. Group competed with group for subsistence. Early warfare probably developed because of the competition for adequate food, and the tools used for hunting -- the club, the spear, the knife -- became the weapons of war.

In the thousands of years that followed before people began to record their history, no doubt other drives -- such as the urge to dominate or the desire for independence-became additional causes of conflict.

Weapons & Warfare. Copyright © by Milton Meltzer. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)