Weather Mania: Discovering What's Up and What's Coming Down

Weather Mania: Discovering What's Up and What's Coming Down

by Michael A. DiSpezio, Dave Garbot
     
 

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Whether there's a tropical heat wave or a chill in the air, whether there's rain, sleet, or snow, have some meteorological fun while learning about everything from hurricanes to sunny blue skies. How can you fly "above the weather?" What are the lowest and highest temperatures ever recorded on earth—and the solar system? How can you convert Celsius to Fahrenheit?

Overview

Whether there's a tropical heat wave or a chill in the air, whether there's rain, sleet, or snow, have some meteorological fun while learning about everything from hurricanes to sunny blue skies. How can you fly "above the weather?" What are the lowest and highest temperatures ever recorded on earth—and the solar system? How can you convert Celsius to Fahrenheit? What causes lightning and thunder? How do you read a weather map? And, along with these cool facts, try some really great experiments: with plastic cups, sand, water, and a thermometer, check and see whether the land or sea changes temperature faster. Or, get blown away with a homemade anemometer that measures wind speed. Create clouds in a jar. Plus—amazing trivia-like the day it rained frogs in Kansas City!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Engaging text and colorful illustrations make this nonfiction book about the science of weather a winner. Including clear explanations (with appropriate and humorous analogies and examples) with easy-to-follow instructions for experiments, DiSpezio leads readers through lessons on temperature, air pressure, wind, storms and many other weather-related topics. There is even a section called "Bad Hair Day" which explains the effect of humidity on hairstyles. A typical experiment would be the construction of a weather vane or an experiment involving warm water and ice in a jar to observe cloud formation. Very appropriate for classroom use under the guidance of a science teacher, this book would also appeal to budding meteorologists; the accessibility of the text and the experiments (using easily found household items) would make it possible for a motivated child to work independently. Pronunciation guides are given in the text for more difficult terms such as anemometer or condensation. End matter includes an index. 2002, Sterling Publishing Co, Ages 9 to 13.
—Anne Marie Pace
School Library Journal
Gr 5-7-A lively addition to the 551.5s, with two-page units such as "Blowing in the Wind" and "Pressured into Moving" accompanied by colorful, cartoonlike illustrations and diagrams. Also in the mix are loads of experiments using found materials to make everything from a hair hygrometer to a wind sock to a model of the water cycle. (Caution: One experiment requires a fluorescent bulb, which can implode under certain circumstances.) The text is brief, chatty, and informative, and the format is nonthreatening. If you already own Mark Breen and Kathleen Friestad's similarly chatty The Kids' Book of Weather Forecasting (Williamson, 2000) and/or Franklyn Branley's golden oldie It's Raining Cats and Dogs (Houghton, 1987) or Jonathan Kahl's more formal The National Audubon Society First Field Guide: Weather (Scholastic, 1998) or Brian Cosgrove's busy, eye-catching Weather (DK, 2000), you could pass this by. Still, weather is a popular topic, so if your collection needs to be brisked up a tad (and you can get past that caution), this title is attractive and fun.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402708602
Publisher:
Sterling
Publication date:
08/01/2003
Pages:
80
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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