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Web Development with Java Server Pages

Overview

Covers all aspects of development for the new versions of the JSP and Servlet specifications (1.2 and 2.3, respectively), including servlet filters and enhancements to the API for JSP Tag Libraries and the interaction between JSP and other J2EE technologies.

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Overview

Covers all aspects of development for the new versions of the JSP and Servlet specifications (1.2 and 2.3, respectively), including servlet filters and enhancements to the API for JSP Tag Libraries and the interaction between JSP and other J2EE technologies.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781930110120
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/30/2001
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 800
  • Product dimensions: 7.26 (w) x 9.32 (h) x 1.56 (d)

Meet the Author

Fields-Engineer for the E-business Enablement group of IBM's Tivoli Systems, where he creates Web-based applications with Java and JSP

Kolb is a reformed rocket scientist with graduate and undergraduate degrees from MIT.

Shawn Bayern is a research programmer at Yale University, the reference-implementation lead for the JSTL, and the coauthor of Web Development with Java Server Pages. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

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Table of Contents

1 Introduction 1
1.1 What is JSP? 2
1.2 Dynamic content on the web 2
1.3 The role of JSP 13
2 HTTP and servlets 17
2.1 The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) 18
2.2 Java servlets 23
3 First steps 30
3.1 Simple text 31
3.2 Dynamic content 32
3.3 Processing requests and managing sessions 38
3.4 Separating logic from presentation 41
3.5 Review of examples 45
4 How JSP works 46
4.1 The structure of JSP pages 47
4.2 Behind the scenes 52
4.3 What the environment provides 56
5 Programming JSP scripts 65
5.1 Scripting languages 66
5.2 JSP tages 68
5.3 JSP directives 68
5.4 Scripting elements 83
5.5 Flow of control 93
5.6 Comments 97
6 Actions and implicit objects 101
6.1 Implicit objects 102
6.2 Actions 121
7 Using JSP components 129
7.1 The JSP component model 130
7.2 JavaBean fundamentals 135
7.3 JSP bean tags 140
8 Developing JSP components 165
8.1 What makes a bean a bean? 166
8.2 Some examples 182
8.3 Bean interfaces 189
8.4 Mixing scriptlets and bean tags 192
9 Working with databases 198
9.1 JSP and JDBC 199
9.2 Database driven JSPs 202
9.3 Example: JSP conference booking tool 217
10 Architecting JSP applications 229
10.1 Web applications 230
10.2 Page-centric design 233
10.3 Servlet-centric design 242
10.4 Enterprise JavaBeans 263
10.5 Choosing an appropriate architecture 266
11 An example JSP project 272
11.1 An FAQ system 273
11.2 The storage module 278
11.3 The administration module 286
11.4 The web access module 311
12 Introducing filters and listeners 318
12.1 Life-cycle event listeners 319
12.2 Filters 326
12.3 Using filters and listeners 333
13 Applying filters and listeners 334
13.1 Application description 335
13.2 User authentication 337
13.3 Web authentication 341
13.4 Access control filters 360
13.5 Logging listener 368
13.6 Content filter 372
14 Deploying JSP applications 384
14.1 This means WAR 385
14.2 The art of WAR 390
14.3 Maintaining a WAR footing 415
15 Performing common JSP tasks 418
15.1 Handling cookies 419
15.2 Creating error pages 425
15.3 Mixing JSP and JavaScript 437
15.4 Building interactive interfaces 441
15.5 Validating form data 451
15.6 Building a shopping cart 458
15.7 Miscellaneous tasks 467
16 Generating non-HTML content 470
16.1 Working with non-HTML content 471
16.2 Text content formats 475
16.3 XML documents 477
16.4 External content 482
16.5 Advanced content formats 487
17 JSP by example 493
17.1 A rotating banner ad 494
17.2 A random quote generator 497
17.3 The Tell a Friend! sticker 499
17.4 A JSP Whois client 505
17.5 An index generator 517
17.6 A button to view JSP source 525
18 Creating custom tags 529
18.1 Role of custom tags 530
18.2 How tag libraries work 531
18.3 Tag library descriptors 535
18.4 API overview 544
18.5 Example tag library 559
18.6 Content substitution 560
18.7 Tag attributes 563
18.8 Content translation 567
18.9 Exception handling 575
18.10 To be continued 580
19 Implementing advanced custom tags 582
19.1 Tag scripting variables 583
19.2 Flow of control 587
19.3 Interacting tags 613
19.4 The final ingredient 619
20 Validating custom tag libraries 621
20.1 Two representations of JSP 622
20.2 JSP pages as XML documents 624
20.3 Tag library validation 631
20.4 Example validators 634
20.5 Packaging the tag library 660
20.6 For further information 666
A Changes in the JSP 1.2 API 669
A.1 Introduction 669
A.2 Changes to the API 670
A.3 Web application changes 672
A.4 Custom tag improvements 673
A.5 JavaBean changes 674
A.6 New servlet features 674
B Running the reference implementation 676
B.1 Prerequisites 677
B.2 Downloading and installing Tomcat 677
B.3 Web applications and Tomcat 681
C Incorporating Java applets 683
C.1 Browser support for Java 683
C.2 The plug-in action 685
C.3 Example: applet configuration 690
D JSP resources 697
D.1 Java implementations 697
D.2 JSP-related web sites 697
D.3 JSP FAQs and tutorials 698
D.4 JSP containers 698
D.5 Java application servers with JSP support 699
D.6 JSP development tools 700
D.7 Tools for performance testing 700
D.8 Mailing lists and newsgroups 700
E JSP syntax reference 702
E.1 Content comments 702
E.2 JSP comments 703
E.3 [left angle bracket]jsp:declaration[right angle bracket] 704
E.4 [left angle bracket]jsp:directive.include[right angle bracket] 705
E.5 [left angle bracket]jsp:directive.page[right angle bracket] 706
E.6 [left angle bracket]jsp:directive.taglib[right angle bracket] 707
E.7 [left angle bracket]jsp:expression[right angle bracket] 708
E.8 [left angle bracket]jsp:forward[right angle bracket] 709
E.9 [left angle bracket]jsp:getProperty[right angle bracket] 710
E.10 [left angle bracket]jsp:include[right angle bracket] 711
E.11 [left angle bracket]jsp:plugin[right angle bracket] 712
E.12 [left angle bracket]jsp:scriptlet[right angle bracket] 713
E.13 [left angle bracket]jsp:setProperty[right angle bracket] 714
E.14 [left angle bracket]jsp:useBean[right angle bracket] 715
F JSP API reference 718
F.1 JSP implicit objects 719
F.2 Package javax.servlet 719
F.3 Package javax.servlet.http 727
F.4 Package javax.servlet.jsp 735
F.5 Package javax.servlet.jsp.tagext 740
Index 747
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