Web Search Garage

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Best-selling author and research expert Tara Calishain offers her insider tips and tricks for web searching in this title from Prentice Hall PTR's Garage Series. The book begins with an in-depth look at search engines and other online tools such as browsers. It describes several principles of web searching to help you leverage the scope of the Internet to discover information. The book also covers specific topic areas of Internet searching, both domestically and internationally. Finally, Web Search Garage ...

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Overview

Best-selling author and research expert Tara Calishain offers her insider tips and tricks for web searching in this title from Prentice Hall PTR's Garage Series. The book begins with an in-depth look at search engines and other online tools such as browsers. It describes several principles of web searching to help you leverage the scope of the Internet to discover information. The book also covers specific topic areas of Internet searching, both domestically and internationally. Finally, Web Search Garage includes a special technical support section to teach you how to find the support solutions you need on the Internet.

Specific topics covered include

  • Search engines
  • Browsers
  • The principles of web searching
  • Searching for news, jobs, and local information
  • Finding images and audio on the web
  • Searching for people
  • Genealogy research
  • Consumer help
  • Drugs and medical information
  • Kid-safe searching

Whether you're a newbie or an Internet search guru, Web Search Garage is a valuable resource for using the Internet wisely to find the information you're looking for. Calishain's thorough explanations and examples, combined with her entertaining wit will help you fine-tune your skills and search the Internet to find convenient solutions.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Find anything. Well, darned near.

Tara Calishain’s Web Search Garage is one of the smartest and most useful web research guides we’ve ever seen. No surprise, perhaps: Calishain’s ResarchBuzz.com is one of the Web’s handiest research resources (even Time magazine’s noticed it).

Calishain starts off with the “elements” of searching: the techniques, gadgets, and tweaks that’ll help you find what you’re looking for faster, with less of the junk you don’t need. Next, the “principles” of searching: approaches that’ll help you figure out where and how to look. (For example, the Principle of the Reinvented Wheel: whatever you’re interested in, chances are there’s a community of people already interested in it. Find the community, and you’ll find the answers.) Calishain’s “Principle of Salt Grains” chapter even helps you decide whether you can trust what you’ve found, based on a few simple questions you can ask about any page or site (or email chain letter!).

Here, too, are the sources, including plenty you might not have known about (like, for example, the Web’s best obituary databases, or where to find great photos of famous 19th-century Americans). And, finally, here are examples: prefabricated searches that are likely to find exactly what you’re looking for.

So what are you looking for? ZIP codes? Audio clips? Your ex-girlfriend? Your state’s Do Not Call registry? Human experts? Song lyrics? Labor statistics? Look here first, and you’re 90 percent there. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2003 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

Slashdot.org
The perfect book for the average web user who wants to improve his research skills. I'd put this one in the Christmas stocking for all those people who are getting a new computer or a new broadband connection. That's not to say that the more technical savvy will find nothing in this book, so if you give a copy to someone, either read it first or borrow it back -- you may find it worth enough to get your own copy.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131471481
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 8/9/2004
  • Series: Garage Series
  • Pages: 236
  • Product dimensions: 6.98 (w) x 9.28 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

About The Author

Tara Calishain is the editor of ResearchBuzz, a weekly newsletter on Internet searching. She's also a regular columnist for SEARCHER and has written for a variety of other publications. Her author/co-author credits include Google Hacks and Official Netscape Guide to Internet Research.

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Read an Excerpt

Preface

In the last ten years or so I've been fascinated with the Web. And since the Web started getting large enough to require organization, I've been fascinated with how that organization has evolved. From very basic text pages and Big Red Buttons That Don't Do Anything, we've moved to extensive databases, search engines, and online information collections of all sorts. Since I wrote the Official Netscape Guide to Internet Research in 1996, the landscape has changed dramatically.

In 1996 it was possible to maintain a "big picture" idea of resources available online: even if you couldn't track down every last one you had a sense of what was available, where the gaps were, and so on. Now that's impossible. The Internet is growing too quickly. But hey, these are the kinds of problems you want to have, right? A rapidly growing collection of information, with a rapidly growing set of tools for dealing with it.

In 1996 I decided I was crazy about search engines. I loved experimenting with them, learning the syntaxes, trying to figure out how to make them work best. I'm still crazy about them. I'm almost as crazy about trying to teach other people to use the search engines, to help them take advantage of the wealth of information that's appearing online.

Thanks for buying this book. If you, too, get bitten by the search engine bug, join me over at ResearchBuzz.com. There I'll try to keep you up to date with developments in the search engine world.

Thanks for reading.

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Table of Contents

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

I.·INTRODUCTION TO WEB SEARCHING.

1. Search Engines.

Full-Text Engines.

Searchable Subject Indexes.

The Next Step: A Search Engine Flyover.

Google.

Google's Non-Web Search Properties.

Yahoo-http://directory.yahoo.com.

2. Other Search Engines.

Other Engines.

Keeping an Eye Out for New Search Engines.

3. Online Tools and Gadgets:

Browsers & More.

Browsers.

Other Browsers to Consider.

Which Browser Should I Use?

Search Toolbars.

Bookmarklets.

Web-Based Gadgets.

Client-Side Software for Internet Research.

Some General Places to Get Software.

II.·PRINCIPLES OF WEB SEARCHING.

4. The Principle of Unique Language.

Understanding and Finding Unique Language

for Your Searches.

Using Unique Language in Your Searches.

5. The Principle of the

Reinvented Wheel.

Finding Friendly Communities.

Searching Usenet.

Finding Specialty Link Lists and Directories.

Finding Voices.

6. The Principle of Onions.

Searching for Lyrics.

Searching for Technical Help.

Searching for Dog Breed Information.

Searching for Biographical Information for a Term Paper.

7. The Principle of Nicknames.

People.

Places.

Things.

8. The Principle of Every Scrap.

Your First Search and Your Next Searches.

Organizing Your Scraps.

Scraps to More Search?

Putting Scraps on to Simmer.

9. The Principle of Mass Similar.

Using Brand Names to Narrow Your Search.

Finding Brand Names in the First Place.

Using Google Search to Build Lists of Names.

Getting Lists of Names When You Don't Even Have One.

10. The Principle of the World Beyond.

The Commandments for the Questioner.

Experts in Associations.

Expert Lists.

Finding Experts Using Google.

11. The Principle of the

Expanding Web.

News Sites.

Search Engines.

Specialty Pages.

What Do You Do When You've Got 'Em?

12. The Principle of Applied Power.

A Recap: What Are Special Syntaxes?

Special Syntaxes on Full-Text Engines.

Special Syntaxes on Searchable Subject Indexes.

Using Two or More Syntaxes.

13. The Principle of Salt Grains.

Questions to Ask About a Web Page.

Checking Out "Internet Facts".

III.·SEARCHING THE WEB.

14. News Searching.

Web Searching for News Articles.

Using News Search Engines.

Other Places to Search News.

15. Job Searching.

Using Plain Search Engines and Company Sites.

Local Resources (Newspaper Classifieds).

State-Level Job Finders.

National-Level Job Finders.

Job Search Engines.

16. Finding Local Information

on the Web.

Zip Code.

City Sites.

State Sites.

Finding Deep State Resources in Google.

Federal.

International.

Finding Information for Groups of Countries.

IV.·SEARCHING FOR MULTIMEDIA.

17. Finding Images.

Avoiding the Naughty Bits.

Image Search Engines Associated with Major

Search Engines.

Specialized Image Search Engines.

Specialized Image Collections.

Finding Image Collections Via Web Searches.

18. Finding Audio on the Web.

Sound Formats.

Playing Sounds.

Searching for Sound.

V.·SEARCHING FOR PEOPLE.

19. People Searching.

A Few Words on Privacy.

General People Searching.

General Phone Books.

Specialized Phone Books.

Address and Zip Code Helpers.

20. Genealogy Research Online.

Source Material.

Great "Roundup Sites" for Genealogy Information.

21. Ready Reference.

Search Engine Tools for Ready Reference.

Roundup Tools.

Dictionaries.

Encyclopedias.

Almanacs.

More Ready Reference.

VI.·CONSUMER SEARCHING.

22. Consumer Help.

Finding Product Information.

Getting Other People's Opinions.

Consumer Protection.

Recall Information.

Where to Complain.

Watch Your Step.

23. Drugs and Medical Information.

Tara's Quick Medical Warning.

General Medical Searching.

Community and Support Sites.

Drugs and Web Searches.

24. Kid-Safe Searching.

Tara's Rant About Kids and the Internet.

Using Full-Text Searching.

Kid-Safe Subject Indexes: A Better Way to Go.

VII.·TECHNICAL SUPPORT.

25. Drivers, Cheats, Help, and More.

Finding the Community Help.

Finding Help for Routine Things.

VIII.·SEARCHING THE WORLD.

26. International Information.

What Search Engines Offer.

Specialty Sites and Directories for Country Information.

Translation Tools.

Index.

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Preface

Preface

In the last ten years or so I've been fascinated with the Web. And since the Web started getting large enough to require organization, I've been fascinated with how that organization has evolved. From very basic text pages and Big Red Buttons That Don't Do Anything, we've moved to extensive databases, search engines, and online information collections of all sorts. Since I wrote the Official Netscape Guide to Internet Research in 1996, the landscape has changed dramatically.

In 1996 it was possible to maintain a "big picture" idea of resources available online: even if you couldn't track down every last one you had a sense of what was available, where the gaps were, and so on. Now that's impossible. The Internet is growing too quickly. But hey, these are the kinds of problems you want to have, right? A rapidly growing collection of information, with a rapidly growing set of tools for dealing with it.

In 1996 I decided I was crazy about search engines. I loved experimenting with them, learning the syntaxes, trying to figure out how to make them work best. I'm still crazy about them. I'm almost as crazy about trying to teach other people to use the search engines, to help them take advantage of the wealth of information that's appearing online.

Thanks for buying this book. If you, too, get bitten by the search engine bug, join me over at ResearchBuzz.com. There I'll try to keep you up to date with developments in the search engine world.

Thanks for reading.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Preface

In the last ten years or so I've been fascinated with the Web. And since the Web started getting large enough to require organization, I've been fascinated with how that organization has evolved. From very basic text pages and Big Red Buttons That Don't Do Anything, we've moved to extensive databases, search engines, and online information collections of all sorts. Since I wrote the Official Netscape Guide to Internet Research in 1996, the landscape has changed dramatically.

In 1996 it was possible to maintain a "big picture" idea of resources available online: even if you couldn't track down every last one you had a sense of what was available, where the gaps were, and so on. Now that's impossible. The Internet is growing too quickly. But hey, these are the kinds of problems you want to have, right? A rapidly growing collection of information, with a rapidly growing set of tools for dealing with it.

In 1996 I decided I was crazy about search engines. I loved experimenting with them, learning the syntaxes, trying to figure out how to make them work best. I'm still crazy about them. I'm almost as crazy about trying to teach other people to use the search engines, to help them take advantage of the wealth of information that's appearing online.

Thanks for buying this book. If you, too, get bitten by the search engine bug, join me over at ResearchBuzz.com. There I'll try to keep you up to date with developments in the search engine world.

Thanks for reading.

Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2004

    Try something other than Google

    From the co-author of the well-received 'Google Hacks' comes what you might consider a sequel. Instead of just considering Google, she shows you what other data resources for searching exist on the Web. Because there is a problem. The current dominant position of Google in search may lead too many people to unnecessarily confine their searching to it. Even if they know of other search engines, like Yahoo or Altavista. While Google may like this, you may benefit from knowing and using other resources. Plus, many newcomers to the Web who only use Google may not even be aware of language translating via Altavista's Babelfish, for example. Or that Corbis and Getty Images have a vast collection of searchable images. While Google does let you search images across the entire Web, this breadth comes at a price. Limited information about each image. Whereas Corbis and Getty have catalogued collections, permitting more detailed searching. Anyway, the entire book is like this. Think of it as a necessary antidote to Google.

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