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Web Security: A Matter of Trust
     

Web Security: A Matter of Trust

by Simson Garfinkel
 

"Web surfing is a dangerous sport," observes one of the key papers inWeb Security: A Matter of Trust, the Summer 1997 issue of theWorld Wide Web Journal. Indeed it is — we are always at risk while downloading "cool" new applets, protecting secure information services, and even in trusting that a Web page comes from the stated author. The

Overview

"Web surfing is a dangerous sport," observes one of the key papers inWeb Security: A Matter of Trust, the Summer 1997 issue of theWorld Wide Web Journal. Indeed it is — we are always at risk while downloading "cool" new applets, protecting secure information services, and even in trusting that a Web page comes from the stated author. The interviews, specifications, and articles in this issue reframe the debate as a matter of trust rather than cryptography.Of course, strong security technology is still the foundation (good fences make good neighbors!), but a broad recent survey concerning public Web site vulnerability shows that our fences are in poor shape. The remedy is more careful administration, deployment of new cryptographic protocols, and public key distribution infrastructure. To protect real-world applications such as health care, electronic commerce, and protected "lockboxes" for digital content, however, means understanding tough concepts: Who is authorized to look at this data? Why? And on whose authority? This leads us to questions of trust management, a new approach to automated security decision making.This issue covers W3C's Digital Signature Initiative (DSI), which breaks new ground in this area by binding machine-readable labels to public key signatures. Other topics include medical records privacy issues (Lincoln Stein), signature legality (C. Bradford Biddle), trust in Internet information systems (Rohit Khare), the PGP Web of Trust (Simson Garfinkel), REFEREE: a trust management system for Web applications (presented at WWW6 by Yang-Hua Chu), as well as articles on Java security, the "hacker threat," and much more.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565923294
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/08/1997
Series:
World Wide Web Journal Series
Pages:
282
Product dimensions:
7.04(w) x 9.18(h) x 0.72(d)

Meet the Author

Simson Garfinkel is a journalist, entrepreneur, and international authority on computer security. Garfinkel is chief technology officer at Sandstorm Enterprises, a Boston-based firm that develops state-of-the-art computer security tools.

Cricket Liu matriculated at the University of California's Berkeley campus, that great bastion of free speech, unencumbered Unix, and cheap pizza. He joined Hewlett-Packard after graduation and worked for HP for nine years. Cricket began managing the hp.com zone after the Loma Prieta earthquake forcibly transferred the zone's management from HP Labs to HP's Corporate Offices (by cracking a sprinkler main and flooding Labs' computer room). Cricket was hostmaster@hp.com for over three years, and then joined HP's Professional Services Organization to cofound HP's Internet Consulting Program. Cricket left HP in 1997 to form Acme Byte & Wire, a DNS consulting and training company, with his friend (and now co-author) Matt Larson. Network Solutions acquired Acme in June 2000, and later the same day merged with VeriSign. Cricket worked for a year as Director of DNS Product Management for VeriSign Global Registry Services. Cricket joined Men & Mice, an Icelandic company specializing in DNS software and services, in September, 2001. He is currently their Vice President, Research & Development. Cricket, his wife, Paige, and their son, Walt, live in Colorado with two Siberian Huskies, Annie and Dakota. On warm weekend afternoons, you'll probably find them on the flying trapeze or wakeboarding behind Betty Blue.

Lincoln Stein is an assistant investigator at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where he develops databases and user interfaces for the Human Genome Project using the Apache server and its module API. He is the author of several books about programming for the Web, including The Official Guide to CGI.pm, How to Set Up and Maintain a Web Site, and Web Security: A Step-by-Step Reference Guide.

Gilmore's career spans many years in Hollywood and New York as an actor, director, and screenwriter.

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