Wee Willie Winkie And Other Stories

Wee Willie Winkie And Other Stories

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by Rudyard Kipling
     
 

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Wee Willie Winkie and Other Stories begins with the tale of Percival William Williams and how one fateful journey forces him to enter his manhood and leave his childish ways behind him. This, and the delightful tales that follow, are some of Kipling’s best-loved works and paint an enduring picture of British life in the Indian Subcontinent.

Overview

Wee Willie Winkie and Other Stories begins with the tale of Percival William Williams and how one fateful journey forces him to enter his manhood and leave his childish ways behind him. This, and the delightful tales that follow, are some of Kipling’s best-loved works and paint an enduring picture of British life in the Indian Subcontinent.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780755117376
Publisher:
House of Stratus, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/11/2011
Edition description:
New edition
Pages:
100
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.07(h) x 0.24(d)

Meet the Author

Rudyard Joseph Kipling was born in the then named Bombay, India on 30th December 1865. Aged six, he was sent to England to be educated, firstly in Southsea, where he was cared for in a foster home, and later at Westward Ho, a United Services College in Devon. A life of misery at the former was described in his story 'Baa Baa Black Sheep', whilst Westward Ho was used as a basis for his questioning the public school ethic in 'Stalky and Co'. Kipling returned to India in 1882 to work as an assistant editor for the Civil and Military Gazette of Lahore. His reputation as a writer was established with stories of English life in India, published there in 1888/9. ‘The Phantom Rickshaw’, ‘Soldiers Three’ and ‘Under the Deodars’ are amongst these early works. Returning to England in 1889, Kipling settled in London and continued to earn a living as a writer. In 1892 he married Caroline Balestier, an American. They travelled extensively in the following four years, including a spell living in America, and it was in this time most of his enduring work was written, not least ‘The Jungle Book’ and ‘The Second Jungle Book’. Kipling once again returned to England in 1896 and continued his writing career, although tragedy hit the family when his eldest daughter, Josephine, died in 1899. Nonetheless, in 1901 he completed ‘Kim’, often considered to be his best work. The following year, having settled in Sussex, he published ‘Just So Stories’, a book he had planned to write for Josephine. Having refused the position of Poet Laureate, which was offered in 1895, he did accept the Nobel Prize for Literature, becoming the first English author to be so honoured. By 1910, however, Kipling’s appeal was waning. His poems and stories were based on values that were perceived as outdated. There was widespread reaction against Victorian imperialism, highlighted by the incompetent management of the Boer War. When World War I came, Kipling had difficulty in adapting to the mood of the public and after his only son, John, was reported missing in action believed killed in 1915, he became very active on the War Graves Commission. After the war he became an increasingly isolated figure, although some of his best writing was to come, with ‘Debits and Credits’ in 1926 and ‘Limits and Renewals’ in 1932. Kipling died in 1936 in London and was buried in Westminster Abbey. Today, however, he is once again avidly read not just for the quality of his writing and storytelling, but through a renewed interest in the behaviour and values he represented.

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Wee Willie Winkie and Other Stories 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While Kipling's stories are wonderful, this is a scanned to text book that has not been proofread, nor has it had the page headers removed, making it difficult to decipher.
Ausonius More than 1 year ago
Before he was 17 years old, Rudyard Kipling had returned to the land of his birth, India, to begin "seven years hard" of journalism. He was assistant editor first of the Civil and Military Gazette in Lahore then of the nationally more prominent sister-paper the Pioneer in Allahabad. Soon enough he found time during long blistering hot days and nights newspapering in "the plains" to write in prose and poetry and also to publish sketches of life in India. *** Working enormously hard throughout 1888 he brought out one book of 14 short stories in prose called WEE WILLIE WINKIE AND OTHER CHILD STORIES. Having proven to himself that he was meant to be a writer of original works and that people would pay to read him, Rudyard Kipling gave up his journalistic position. He traveled eastward by sea, then across the USA and settled in London in 1889 where he was instantly lionized. *** When first published in India the 14 WEE WILLIE WINKIE AND OTHER CHILD STORIES were advertised as "illustrations of the four main features of Anglo-Indian life, viz., the Military, Domestic, Native and Social." They included six tales of illicit English amours in Simla, India's 7,000 foot high summer capital, four tales of ghosts and the supernatural or far-fetched (including "The Man who would be King") and four stories of five-, six- and 14-year old English boys and their adventures in India and/or England. Of these the saddest is "Baa, Baa, Black Sheep" about the boy Kipling's own mistreatment during five years in a seaside boarding house and at school in England. *** Some of the flavor of the whole book is given in "A Second-Rate Woman." Set in the high hill station of Simla, this is one of Kipling's several tales down the decades of Mrs Lucy Hauksbee, who epitomizes all that is worst about British "straw widows" who summer in the Himalayas while their absent husbands toil and sweat down in the baking plains. *** Mrs Hauksbee shares a cottage with another straw widow Mrs Polly Mallowe, the latter lazy, growing fat on chocolates but less harsh in her judgments of the British in Simla than is Mrs Hauksbee. At tale's beginning, the object of Mrs Hauksbee's contempt is the Dowd ("dowdy"), Mrs Delville "a second-rate woman," an extraordinarily poorly dressed straw widow herself whose deep grey eyes nonetheless attract men like flies to honey, especially a fat, ageing "Dancing Master, Mr Bent. Bent's wife and baby daughter are away with her mother. Mrs Hauksbee is grooming Hawnsley, a young officer, knocking the rough spots off his manners, looking for a good wife for him. Mix all those ingredients, with the arrival of Mrs Bent and baby and you have four women trying to make sense of themselves and all of them laboring in a dither to save baby Dora Dent who is close to dying from diptheria. All of which wittily, paradoxically somehow proves that we women "... know a great deal more of men than our own sex." -OOO-