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Weed Is a Seed
     

Weed Is a Seed

by Frida Wolff, Janet Pedersen (Illustrator)
 
Readers can see how the same object, event, or activity can be viewed in two different ways, both of them true. The rain that spoils the family's picnic helps crops grow, and autumn leaves that are boring to rake are fun to jump on. "Wolff's verse sings right along, drawing comparisons until readers will be ready to jump in with their own dual observations. . . .

Overview

Readers can see how the same object, event, or activity can be viewed in two different ways, both of them true. The rain that spoils the family's picnic helps crops grow, and autumn leaves that are boring to rake are fun to jump on. "Wolff's verse sings right along, drawing comparisons until readers will be ready to jump in with their own dual observations. . . . Jolly." -- Kirkus Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Optimism runneth over in this picture book about finding all the silver linings that nature has to offer. In rhyming verse, Wolff (The Emperor's Garden) points out the down side of such natural wonders as moths, sand, earthworms and air, and then extolls their virtues: "A breeze brings a sneeze/ to a sensitive nose/ that gets itches from roses and hay. / But a breeze in the trees/ and a cool lemonade/ ease the heat of a bright summer day." Readers may find themselves in the middle of a page-turning guessing game here, since positive and negative points never appear on the same spread. Debut artist Pedersen's loosely composed watercolor and ink artwork possesses a whimsical, lightly comic spirit that prevents the book from becoming overly Pollyanna-ish. An effective food-for-thought exercise inspired by Mother Nature. Ages 4-7. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-As a family works and plays through the year, they discover how many things can be looked at in two different ways. "A breeze brings a sneeze/ to a sensitive nose/ that gets itches from roses and hay./ But a breeze in the trees/ and a cool lemonade/ ease the heat of a bright summer day." This pattern of rhyme is carried throughout the book, with the negative perspective on each right-hand page and the positive side revealed on the overleaf. The watercolor- and-ink cartoon illustrations are lively and great fun. Subjects such as sand, sun, and rain fit more easily into the mold than darkness and hills. But the rhymes are pleasing to the ear, and the concept of looking at things from various points of view could generate a thoughtful discussion.-Carolyn Jenks, First Parish Unitarian Church, Portland, ME
Kirkus Reviews
In a rhyming book, Wolff (The Emperor's Garden, 1994, etc.) looks at everyday things from opposing points of view. A person may think, "A weed is a seed/that just doesn't belong/in the place where it happens to grow." To a hungry mouse, though, the weed is a welcome meal. Rain spoils a picnic but waters a farmer's crops. Leaves are a nuisance to rake but fun to jump in.

Wolff's verse sings right along, drawing comparisons until readers will be ready to jump in with their own dual observations. In her first book, Pedersen offers lighthearted watercolors that play up the humor of the contrasts, cartoonish without ever lapsing into silliness. Jolly.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395722916
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company
Publication date:
03/01/1996
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.63(w) x 8.31(h) x 0.37(d)
Lexile:
NC920L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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