Weedless Gardening

Weedless Gardening

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by Lee Reich, Michael A. Hill
     
 

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Conventional wisdom says to garden from the bottom up, turning over the soil every spring until your back aches. Ironically, this does such a good job aerating that gardeners spend the rest of the season pulling weeds and replacing the suddenly energized (and easily used up) nutrients. Mother nature, on the other hand, gardens from the top down-layering undisturbed

Overview

Conventional wisdom says to garden from the bottom up, turning over the soil every spring until your back aches. Ironically, this does such a good job aerating that gardeners spend the rest of the season pulling weeds and replacing the suddenly energized (and easily used up) nutrients. Mother nature, on the other hand, gardens from the top down-layering undisturbed soil with leaves and other organic materials. In following this example and synthesizing the work of other perceptive gardeners, Lee Reich presents a compelling new system called weedless gardening.

The Weedless Garden is good for plants and it's good for people. It protects the soil, contributes to plant health, reduces water needs, cuts down on a gardener's labor, encourages earthworms and, of course, mitigates weed problems by keeping the seeds dormant. Four basic tenets form the system's backbone-minimize soil disruption; protect soil surface; avoid soil compaction; use drip irrigation-and the way to get there is simple. For a new bed or established garden, layering is key, and the perfect material to use is also among the most common-newspaper. Add organic mulch and compost on top, and plants are growing in rich, self-generating humus. From vegetable gardening to flower gardens to planting trees, shrubs, and vines, The Weedless Garden works everywhere-allowing the gardener to work quite a bit less.

Editorial Reviews

Garden Design
...the book has plenty of good information about drip irrigations, compost making, vegetable spacing and varieties, tree planting, and more.
Chicago Tribune
Lee Reich says all that digging was a waste of time. Weeks of torturous toil lie behind you.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Weeds are every gardener's nemesis, so any book promising to eliminate them is certain to excite interest. Fortunately, Reich's approach is a credible one. A former agricultural researcher for Cornell University and the USDA, Reich (Uncommon Fruits Worthy of Attention: A Gardener's Guide) challenges conventional gardening or gardening from the bottom up, in which the soil is turned over every spring or fall. This method exposes to light and air all the weed seeds lying dormant in the soil and encourages weed growth. Reich maintains that instead, since soil health determines plant health, gardeners should essentially create new soil by gardening as nature does from the top down. This means placing layers of newspaper over the soil to smother weed growth, covering the area year after year with mulch (which can include compost, leaves, bark chips or peat moss), then planting in that rich medium. He outlines his method in detail, offering modifications for different soil types and adding irrigation, planting, harvesting and tidying tips. Numerous charts and illustrations accompany Reich's chatty, highly literate text. He also discusses cover crops, vegetables, various types of flower garden designs, groundcovers, trees (including fruit trees), shrubs and vines, all of which can flourish under the weedless gardening technique. Reich's is a revolutionary approach to gardening, engagingly and lucidly explained. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
In Weedless Gardening, horticultural expert Lee Reich clearly and concisely offers a system of gardening patterned after Mother Nature, and is good for both plants and people. Rather that the traditional approach to annually digging up and working over the soil, Weedless Gardening provides an easy-to-follow, low-impact, effective, and environment friendly approach to planting and maintaining a flower garden, a vegetable garden, trees, and shrubs. Gardeners seeking to protect the soil, eliminate heavy work, and reduce water needs should first begin planning their gardening activities with a thorough reading of Lee Reich's Weedless Gardening!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761116967
Publisher:
Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/2000
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
165,349
Product dimensions:
5.95(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.52(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Lee Reich is an author, lecturer, and consultant whose books include The Pruning Book and Weedless Gardening. Reich grows a broad assortment of fruit plants in his own garden, which has been featured in the New York Times, Organic Gardening, and Martha Stewart Living.

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Weedless Gardening 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
A_Sloan More than 1 year ago
Rescue Your Garden from Weeds! Having read and loved Ruth Stout's take on weed-free gardening in Gardening Without Work, I was interested to see what else I could on the topic from Lee Reich's "Weedless Gardening." Like any other gardener, I hate weeds and they're a constant thorn in my side. I've constantly wished for a way to banish them from my garden and all to no avail. This year, I think I've got it figure out... The book is relatively short buy incredibly useful. There are not wasted words or chapters, instead everything is clear and concise. The layout is easy to use and understand - meaning that if I ever have a question I am able to flip through and find the answer in no time at all. There are different sections for everything from mulch instruction to garden layouts, planting trees to flower gardens, and much more. Of all the book I've read on the subject of eliminating weeds, this is definitely a favorite. It does what it says on the tin! The methods outlined are simple and some go against common practice but they work. He even recommends abstaining from the spring tilling of your garden because it disrupts the fragile networks of bacteria in the soil. As Reich says, "Weedless gardening springs from very old methods, so old that they might be considered new."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book. It was right to the point, easy to understand and made sense.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Lots of good ideas for the home gardener. Will save many hours bending over. If your interested in a Fun and profitable way to make money from your hobby see the best seller 'Secrets to a Successful Greenhouse and Business'