Overview

The 357th issue of Weird Tales magazine is a celebration of short fiction, with a selection of great new stories.

As evidence of the awesome weirdness in store for you here at Weird Tales, just take a closer look at this issue in your hands. Karen Heuler is back with another wild tale; this time about an unsatisfied woman. Be careful what you wish for, especially when your wish comes from a fish. And J. Robert Lennon invites us to cross ...
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Weird Tales #357

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Overview

The 357th issue of Weird Tales magazine is a celebration of short fiction, with a selection of great new stories.

As evidence of the awesome weirdness in store for you here at Weird Tales, just take a closer look at this issue in your hands. Karen Heuler is back with another wild tale; this time about an unsatisfied woman. Be careful what you wish for, especially when your wish comes from a fish. And J. Robert Lennon invites us to cross through “The Portal” from our world into various others. Karin Tidbeck (a Swedish writer in her first US appearance) takes us from some other world back into our own in “Augusta Prima.” You’ll never look at a croquet ball the same way.

Just when we thought we’d seen it all and we’re too jaded by technology to be surprised by anything, we are swept into yet another world inside the intertubes with N.K. Jemisin’s “The Trojan Girl.” And I know you think that mimes are creepy but you have no idea how scary they are until you read Peter M. Ball’s story “The Last Thing Said Before Silence.” Finishing up this issue is a new Scottish writer, Mark Meredith, who takes us on a strange and wondrous walk.

So sit back and enjoy the trip!
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012645784
  • Publisher: Wildside Press
  • Publication date: 2/22/2011
  • Series: Weird Tales , #357
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 80
  • Sales rank: 728,061
  • File size: 128 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 23, 2011

    Good issue!

    I read this issue as part of my survey of sf and fantasy magazines. Overall, I really enjoyed this issue.

    I enjoyed the narrator of Kressel's "Mitigation Strategies," but I'm not sure enough clues were given for the reader to figure things out by the end of the story (unlike the narrator). I very much liked Karen Heuler's take on the magic wish granting fish folktale in "Fishwish": it had a nice twist at the end which is totally consistent with the logic of the tale. (I read another story which is another retelling of this folktale in the past year, I think either on Ideomancer or Strange Horizons: maybe a collection should be done.) I really enjoyed J. Robert Lennon's "Portal": again, I enjoyed the narrator and also the structure of the tale: it leaves you wondering if the dissolution of the family really is an effect of the portal or just modern suburbia. I thought that "August Prima" by Karen Tidbeck and "The Trojan Girl" by N. K. Jemisin were so-so, mostly because they seemed to tack on the ideas of time and dream (respectively) to their stories, and I didn't like the portrayals of their worlds (seemed superficial). I very much enjoyed Peter Ball's "The Last Thing Said Before Silence"- a bizarre piece involving death by mimes. I also enjoyed "A Short Trek Across Fala Moor," but found it flawed: like Ball's it had an Absurdist element to it, and the narrator's voice/style was pseudo-Victorian, but in the end it was a modern setting, so I found that contrast jarring and detracting from the quality of the story.

    The Book Review column was good: I very much like it when publications include reviews of YA items.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 2, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2011

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