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The Weirdstone of Brisingamen: A Tale of Alderley

Overview

Neither Susan nor her brother, Colin, ever thought that war would be waged over a simple gemstone in her bracelet. But that's what happens when the children visit Alderley Edge, a spooky place in a remote part of England. There, they meet the wizard Cadellin, who needs the stone to rouse his allies in the never-ending battle between good and evil. But when the stone vanishes, Susan and Colin must find it before the forces of evil...

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Overview

Neither Susan nor her brother, Colin, ever thought that war would be waged over a simple gemstone in her bracelet. But that's what happens when the children visit Alderley Edge, a spooky place in a remote part of England. There, they meet the wizard Cadellin, who needs the stone to rouse his allies in the never-ending battle between good and evil. But when the stone vanishes, Susan and Colin must find it before the forces of evil use it to destroy all the goodness that ever existed in the world.
    
Includes an afterword by the author.
 

Susan and her brother Colin, staying with their mother's old nurse near Alderley Edge, are catapulted into a battle between good and evil for possession of a magical stone of great power that, unbeknownst to them, is contained in Susan's favorite bracelet.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy Silverman
Garner spins a good yarn, with wizards, good and evil, dwarves, dragons, an amulet, and a quest. But this one was originally written in 1968, and the style is somewhat dated. The children are too naive for their ages, the action is a little slow, and the solutions to various problems are predictable. Mid-grade kids might enjoy it. 1960 (orig.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-Alan Garner's novel (CollinsVoyager, pap. 2002), first published in 1960, is a classic multilayered British fantasy with dwarves, elves, wizards, goblins, and a shape-shifter. Listeners may be challenged by the many complex names, places, and creatures that make up the story, which has its basis in Celtic and Norse mythology. The protagonists, Susan and Collin, go to Alderley Edge in Cheshire to stay with their mother's former nurse while their parents are abroad. They immediately set out to explore the countryside and set magical events in motion. In the forest, they stumble upon the great wizard who watches over 140 sleeping knights and their horses who are awaiting the time when it will be necessary for them to save the world from evil. Susan realizes that a stone in her bracelet is the famous Firefrost, whose powerful magic safeguards the knights. When her moonstone is stolen, an adventure-laden quest ensues to recapture the stone from the forces of evil. The story is continued in a sequel, The Moon of Gomrath. Philip Madoc reads with a strong, deep voice, effecting the right mood for the menacing events that unfold. The haunting musical interludes between chapters add to the suspense. A good purchase for libraries with comprehensive fantasy audiobook collections. Fans of Tolkien and C.S. Lewis will enjoy this title.-Jo-Ann Carhart, East Islip Public Library, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
"Marvelously exciting . . . the story is ferocious and deeply felt."—New Statesman

 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789626343968
  • Publisher: Naxos Audiobooks Ltd.
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Series: Junior Classics Series
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged, 6 CDs, 7 hours
  • Product dimensions: 6.02 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Meet the Author

ALAN GARNER is the award-winning author of Elidor, The Owl Service, and The Stone Book Quartet. He lives in Cheshire, England.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2006

    A brilliant book for those who like to read.

    Someone should tell the critic that 'critic' is a noun, not a commandment - in other words, it is not necessary to find fault with every book one reads. I read Weirdstone and Gomrath when I was a child. Now as an adult, I own five of Garner's novels and read them to my children - thoroughly modern kids, yet they also love these books. True, the action is not constantly in the reader's face, and perhaps that throws off those who expect nonstop hack-and-slash. More discerning readers will recognize that tension is being built, so that when the action does burst forth, it is actually relevant to both the story and the reader. I recommend these books to any parent or child who values the gift of imagination.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2002

    Vivid and exciting

    I read the Alan Garner books when I was a kid, and I have been waiting for my kids to be old enough to enjoy them. I am re-ordering them for my kids, and can't wait to start reading them again! The descriptions are vivid, the plot exciting, characters are multi-dimensional. I am afraid I disagree with the critic: I think kids from the '2000's' will love them as much as we older folks did.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2001

    No Dragons; Smart Kids; Not Dated as to Style; Great Read

    This was a delight to read. Enjoyed it thoroughly. My copy was published in 1960; so, I doubt Ms Silverman was right about her date, as well as other matters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2000

    The Weirdstone of Brisingamen

    I think this book is good for young and old readers. It is well structured and has a 'must read more' storyline

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2000

    A Lasting work of Children's Fantasy

    Garner spins a marvelous tale. I have read this book at least 15 times and am now reading it to my 5 year old daughter. The syntax and the rich vocabulary are a bit much for her but she is enjoying it none-the-less. This is a superb story of two 'modern era' children who are pulled into the secret workings of a hidden fantasy world. It is neither slow nor particularly dated, although some of the British specific vocabulary might confuse younger readers. You will NOT be disappointed. In fact, with the exception of Garner's 'Red Shift' (which is 'odd' to say the least), ANY Garner book is a damned good tale, for young (and young at heart) adults. Enjoy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2000

    Amazing Alan

    Don't even listen to the other person!! This is a FANTASTIC book and should be read by EVERYONE!!!!!!! I should know. Alan Garner is an amazing author and you should read any books by him. He is WONDERFUL!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

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