Welcome to Jamrock

Welcome to Jamrock

4.8 10
by Damian "Junior Gong" Marley
     
 

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Armed with an air horn, an Ini Kamoze sample, and a gritty tale of life in Jamaica, Damian Marley made a huge splash with his massive single "Welcome to Jamrock," a reggae-meets-hip-hop track that dominated urban radio and street-level mixtapes during the summer of 2005. Dancehall kings Elephant Man and …  See more details below

Overview

Armed with an air horn, an Ini Kamoze sample, and a gritty tale of life in Jamaica, Damian Marley made a huge splash with his massive single "Welcome to Jamrock," a reggae-meets-hip-hop track that dominated urban radio and street-level mixtapes during the summer of 2005. Dancehall kings Elephant Man and Beenie Man had made some worthy crossover progress in 2004, but Damian's hit was the biggest Jamaican splash on mainstream American radio since the days of Shabba Ranks, maybe the days of father Bob himself. Delivering on the promise of the single, Welcome to Jamrock the album is the full-length revolution that's filled with purposeful material, guest appearance from reality television star Bobby Brown included. There's more than enough slick studio trickery to alienate earthy roots fans and this is reggae in one of its loosest definitions, but anyone who's kept his eye on Damian and his brother Stephen -- who is all over the album as a producer, songwriter, and singer -- can tell you this is where the talented, genre-blending duo was headed. Reggae with guest rappers can end up sounding horribly contrived, but the sonic stew the brothers create allows for rap, samples, and all things synthetic and acoustic, along with everything else you'd expect on a Massive Attack album if the dour bunch were fueled by Red Stripe and ghetto Kingston spirit. The slinky "Beautiful" with Brown is the only time the polish threatens to take over, but its new jack-meets-smooth jazz sweetness sounds legit coming from the R&B-loving Damian. "Move!," which borrows a bit of Dad's "Exodus," is a less hooky but no less urgent successor to "Jamrock," as are the trip-hopping "For the Babies" and the opening "Confrontation," which features dialogue from revolutionary heroes Marcus Garvey and Bunny Wailer. Less earth-shaking but just as rich are the swashbuckling "The Master Has Come Back" -- a more spiritual "Return of the Mack" -- and "All Night," a playful number that is very fun, very Fatboy Slim. "We're Gonna Make It" proves Damian can still kick it in a full band and roots style while the heavy reverb with lively jestering on the closing "Khaki Suit" gives the album its most dancehall moment, bringing things comfortably home after 13 tracks of uninhibited exploration. Besides the fantastic single, this album has "legs," with a bulging lyric sheet filled with vivid and crafty lines that offer plenty to focus on once all the sonic brilliance has sunk in. A career-defining moment that lives up to a huge hit, Welcome to Jamrock is a tremendous achievement.

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Product Details

Release Date:
09/13/2005
Label:
Umvd Labels
UPC:
0602498851258
catalogNumber:
000541602
Rank:
9981

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Damian "Junior Gong" Marley   Primary Artist,Keyboards,Indexed Contributor
King Swamp   Vocals
Noel Davey   Piano,Hammond Organ
Paul Fakhourie   Bass,Keyboards,Clavinet
Dean Fraser   Saxophone
Stephen Marley   Synthesizer,Bass,Guitar,Percussion,Keyboards
Owen Reid   Bass
Craig "Niteman" Taylor   Drums
Uziah "Sticky" Thompson   Percussion
Gary Corbett   Keyboards
Dan Warner   Guitar
Julian Marley   Hammond Organ
Alfredo Oliva   Concert Master
Jazzwad   Bass,Drums,Keyboards
Rovleta Fraser   Background Vocals
Roselyn Williams   Background Vocals
Shiah Coore   Bass,Keyboards
Franklin Thompson   Background Vocals
James "Bonzai" Caruso   Keyboards
Sean Diedrick   Keyboards
Stephen "Asher" Noel   Bass,Guitar
Kenneth Roxborough   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Bob Marley   Composer
Stephen Marley   Composer,Producer,Executive Producer
Craig "Niteman" Taylor   Drum Fills
Damian "Junior Gong" Marley   Composer,Producer,Executive Producer,drum programming
Ras Kass   Concept Graphics
Chris Athens   Mastering
Black Thought   Composer
Jazzwad   drum programming
Keith Tamashiro   Art Direction
Larry Warrilow   String Arrangements
Roland McDermott   Engineer
Gregory J. Morris   Engineer
Marc Stephen Lee   Engineer
R. "Eek-A-Mouse" Hylton   Composer
R. Price   Composer
Deron D. James   Cover Design
R. Russell   Composer
James "Bonzai" Caruso   Engineer

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Customer Reviews

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Welcome to Jamrock 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At first i seemed let down by the way popular music was shapin up, but this album is proof that music has a future, with many sounds drawing upon reggae and hip hop, it is a must, especially the remix of his father's classic EXODUS, please pick it up, for 9 bux, u cant be let down!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Every song is on point and it's not the typical reggae music. It combines different types of music to make hot rhythms. It's extremely creative.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i Think this iz hiz best album...all the cutz really clean, blended with hip hop real nice. track 2 iz tight real rootzy...Pimpers paradise iz my prolly my favorite, great album
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album, proves that old school roots reggae and the new roots reggae is not as diffreent as it semms. This album, is not just roots reggae, it has a deep mix with, hip hop. Great CD
Guest More than 1 year ago
truly the best reggae album in a long long while.Full of social commentary,tribal drums,and intense introspection into the state of society.Its hard to imagine that anyone cant feel this!The youngest marley has truly raised the bar for music period!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This IS the best album released in the last year.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this CD December 05 but just listed to the entire album this week-end and WOW!!!! absolutely wonderful mix of songs and beats, keeps you thinking and dancing and blown away by the talent. Good job!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had this album for some time now and “Welcome to Jamrock” is a tremendous achievement for Damian. Stephen has done an outstanding job helping his brother putting this album together. It’s full of social commentary, tribal drums, and intense introspection into the state of society. It’s hard to imagine that anyone can’t feel the voyage to this album and putting this on last night still obtains me. You wont found no typical reggae here, Damian has truly raised the bar here. It’s an exceedingly well produced effort it is reflective, exciting and uplifting from so many perspectives. For me the standout cut is "We're gonna make it" which in many ways is the flip side of "Welcome to Jamrock." where WTJ paints a grim and realistic picture of life in Kingston s inner cities, the Jimmy Riley inspired track, presents a way out. A belief that despite it all there is still a light at the end of the tunnel. If WTJ speaks of lost youth led to criminal behavior by political negligence and abuse, "We're gonna make it" shows that Junior Gong believes these youth can be saved with the key line being “It’s not to Late.” The other tracks on the album display a coherence not found on his masterpiece, “Halfway Tree" even if his lyrics are sometimes not as deeply personal as on “Still Searchin," “Stand a Chance"… etc. Nas lends his masterfully aggressive flows on the politically charged and incredible "Road to Zion." Both "Confrontation" and "Pimpa's Paradise," illustrate why Junior Gong cannot be placed in a box. “Beautiful”- with Bobby Brown is incredible and fittingly name. “In 2 Deep” is just as contagious as well as “For the babies”. Damian brings it old school with "Khaki Suit" this track has a little bit more dancehall due to the presence of Elephant Man along with Bounty Killer and Eek-A-Mouse whom all closes this album exceptional well. This album proves that old and new school roots reggae is not as different as it seems. If you have love for Bob Marley there’s a strong chance you’ll enjoy his son’s as well, it’s absolutely fantastic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album is excellent, every song is dynamic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago