Welcome to Silver Street Farm

Welcome to Silver Street Farm

by Nicola Davies, Katharine McEwen
     
 

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Some animal farms are up in the hills, or down winding lanes. But Silver Street Farm is different — it’s in the middle of a city, and it’s run by kids!

Even though Meera, Gemma, and Karl live in the city, they’ve always wanted a farm of their own. And it looks as though their dream may happen sooner than they imagined when Meera

Overview

Some animal farms are up in the hills, or down winding lanes. But Silver Street Farm is different — it’s in the middle of a city, and it’s run by kids!

Even though Meera, Gemma, and Karl live in the city, they’ve always wanted a farm of their own. And it looks as though their dream may happen sooner than they imagined when Meera discovers an abandoned railway station with grounds for grazing. Next, some eggs they thought were foul hatch into ducklings, and a couple of "poodles" bought off the Internet turn out to be lambs. There’s just one problem: how can the kids — and the community — persuade the city council not to turn the old site into a parking garage? The first in a series of fun-filled stories about Silver Street Farm, here is a tale with natural appeal for kids who love animals, aim to be green, and enjoy a do-ityourself spirit of adventure.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Elizabeth Leis-Newman
On the first day of kindergarten, Meera, Gemma and Karl bond over their love of farm animals and dream of having a city farm. All through elementary school, they dream of their farm, until Gemma convinces them to go look at an abandoned railway station. Meanwhile, Karl's aunt gets snookered into adopting poodles...that turn out to actually be sheep. Then a veterinarian donates eggs that hatch into ducklings. The children have their space and animals, and the interest of the local media, but are nearly derailed by the city council's determination to put up a parking garage at the site. Luckily, by having the support of local business, police and other community members, the children stage a protest and win. By the end, the farm is up and running and a woman named Flora has shown up with her sheepdog to manage the farm, easily setting up the next book in the series. Despite the suspension of disbelief required compared to other books targeted at this age bracket, such as the "Ivy and Bean" series, Silver Street Farm succeeds in imparting its most important lesson, which is children knowing where food comes from. Additionally, the children work together and act with determination and hard work to make their dream come true, a worthwhile lesson. While the book is set in England, readers will not have any problems understanding or relating to the story. It is recommended for early elementary readers. Reviewer: Elizabeth Leis-Newman
Kirkus Reviews
Three kids, many years of planning and an audacious go at public activism add up to one community farm. Though Gemma, Meera and Karl can't quite remember when their dream of having a farm of their own began, it seems to have started in kindergarten. When Mrs. Monty led them to the toy corner, they instantly built a farm, complete with plastic cows, chickens and a headless sheep. Playing farm helped build their friendship, kick-started by these city kids' love of animals and fueled by books about farming and farm life. When Meera's Auntie Priya hears about an old, unused railroad station with outbuildings and land, they decide it's perfect for an urban farm. Moving forward at the speed of elementary students with an obsession, these future farmers visit the space, arrange television interviews and bring local adults on board, all the while facing down the property owner, who plans to raze the railroad station to put up a parking lot. Funny situations, especially Karl's aunt's online purchase of twin poodles that turn out to be sheep, and such details as various animal footprints racing across the bottom of most pages keep this good-hearted tale moving forward. A tidy ending ensures the farm's success. Young activists will be inspired and entertained by these three animal-loving friends and their supportive community. (Chapter book. 6-9)
From the Publisher
With kids actively seeking to better their city as a focal point, Davies has begun an amusing romp of a series. Clever children and supportive adults come together in this clever chapter book that will spark the imaginations of the target audience.
—Booklist
School Library Journal
Gr 2–3—As preschoolers, three children decided that they wanted to have a farm in the middle of their city. They get to make that dream a reality on their last day of elementary school. By chance, they end up with sheep and ducks of their very own with no place to keep them—except for an abandoned lot. Now if only they can convince city officials to let them have the lot for their farm instead of building another parking garage, everything should work out fine. Animal lovers will enjoy the sections that involve the sheep and ducks, but the story line in this early chapter book is completely far-fetched, the animals don't have a strong enough presence, and the characters are not well developed. When the bad guy is defeated, it comes about in an anticlimactic way, making the ending feel rushed. The occasional black-and-white drawings are amusing.—Elizabeth Swistock, Orange County Public Library, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763658311
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
02/28/2012
Series:
Silver Street Farm Series
Pages:
80
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile:
890L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
With kids actively seeking to better their city as a focal point, Davies has begun an amusing romp of a series. Clever children and supportive adults come together in this clever chapter book that will spark the imaginations of the target audience.
—Booklist

Meet the Author

Nicola Davies has a degree in zoology and is the author of many nonfiction books for young readers, including Poop and Just the Right Size, both illustrated by Neal Layton, and Gaia Warriors. The Silver Street Farm stories mark her short-fiction series debut. Nicola Davies lives in Wales.

Katharine McEwen has illustrated more than twenty-five books, including Allan Ahlberg’s The Children Who Smelled a Rat and Phyllis Root’s Here Comes Tabby Cat and Hey, Tabby Cat! Katharine McEwen lives in England.

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