BN.com Gift Guide

Well-Spoken Thesaurus: The Most Powerful Ways to Say Everyday Words and Phrases

( 6 )

Overview

The Ultimate Guide to Powerful Language
If you've ever fumbled while trying to use a big word* to impress a crowd, you know what it's like to* be poorly spoken. The fear of mispronouncing or misusing complex words is real and leaves many of us consigned to the lower levels* of the English Language.
The secret to eloquence, however, lies in simplicity-the ability to use ordinary words in extraordinary ways.
The...

See more details below
Paperback
$9.33
BN.com price
(Save 28%)$12.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $7.82   
  • New (7) from $7.99   
  • Used (2) from $7.82   
Well-Spoken Thesaurus: The Most Powerful Ways to Say Everyday Words and Phrases

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$12.99 List Price

Overview

The Ultimate Guide to Powerful Language
If you've ever fumbled while trying to use a big word* to impress a crowd, you know what it's like to* be poorly spoken. The fear of mispronouncing or misusing complex words is real and leaves many of us consigned to the lower levels* of the English Language.
The secret to eloquence, however, lies in simplicity-the ability to use ordinary words in extraordinary ways.
The Well-Spoken Thesaurus is your guide to eloquence, replacing the ordinary with the extraordinary. While a common thesaurus provides only synonyms as mere word-for-word equivalents, The Well-Spoken Thesaurus is filled with* dynamic reinventions of standard words and phrases.

*lofty word, pretentious word
*know what it is to
*lower reaches, lower echelons
*awash in, instilled with, dense with, rich in

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"In this unconventional, easy-to-use thesaurus, Heehler, a degree student at the Harvard Extension School, invites the reader to speak like an academic without sounding like one." - Book News

"The Well-Spoken Thesaurus is a delightful book for anyone interested in language and the spoken word." - Midge Raymond, Award-winning author of Forgetting English

"How absolutely fascinating." - The Fayetteville Observer

"Winston Churchill, in the words of one of his contemporaries, 'mobilized the English language and sent it into battle.' Like many of the great orators and writers of our time, the prime minister knew the words he used and how he used them were at least as important as the ideas he needed to get across...In 2006, the same idea occurred to an American truck driver." - The Winnipeg Free Press

"A celebration of the spoken word." - Chicago Tribune

"This is your guide to eloquence - replacing ordinary words with extraordinary ones that take your writing to new heights. " - Gotham Writer's Workshop

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402243059
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 255,089
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Tom Heehler is a degree student at the Harvard University Extension School and creator of Fluent in Five Languages, the free online language course where students learn to speak four languages simultaneously - French, Italian, Spanish, and Romanian. You can find this novel approach to language acquisition at FreeLanguageCourses.Blogspot.com.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

On Becoming Articulate

Why Should You Care?

Words are like little gods. The pronoun "him" instead of "her," if used often enough, can dissuade a girl from science or math. The words you use determine the density of gray matter in your brain. They affect your political leanings, influ­ence how you see reality, determine your level of confidence and thus, define what it means to be you. That's what words do.

As important as your words are in shaping your behavior, they are even more important in the way they shape the behavior of others. Your manner of speaking is, if nothing else, the central factor upon which people form assumptions about you. Whatever is your ultimate goal in life, chances are good you're going to have to communicate your way to it. And if greatness is your goal, well-spoken words are essential. Think about it. From Homer to Hemingway, Lincoln, Churchill, King, Obama-their words are why you know them.

The well-spoken few are viewed by others in a different way. They are thought of as more knowledgeable, more informed, and therefore expected to do more things. This law of great expectations is a powerful motivator. We all have an inherent need to meet expectations, whether they be high or low, and when expectations rise, we're inclined to rise with them. Our improvement then becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy: as others expect us to be better, we become so, and as we become so, they expect it further still.

How to Speak Like an Academic without Sounding Like One

The most accomplished speakers use words in ways that complement their thoughts and ideas, not overshadow them. They are able to adopt a scholarly air of authority, but without all those pretentious scholarly words. Take Barack Obama for instance, a man for whom the well-spoken word is a major source of power. President Obama understands, obeys, and exploits the most important command­ment of communication: that it's not so much the words we use, as it is the way we use them. You hear it all the time: "Barack Obama is so articulate, so eloquent, so intelligent." But has he ever used a word any child couldn't comprehend?

It's not easy becoming articulate. For most of us, the process is a never-ending exercise in trial and error. We fumble our way along with the occasional foreign word here or big word there, all the while praying we're pronouncing and using these words correctly. And when we do dare to use these words, we risk casting ourselves as pretentious, awkwardly formal, academic, or nerdy. Have you ever used a lofty word and felt embarrassed at having done so? We've all been there. We hear others use these words with ease, but when we try them for size, they don't always fit. That's because we confuse formality with what we believe to be articulate speech. We deploy such language in an attempt to present ourselves as professional when, ironically, usually the opposite effect is achieved.

The same can be said for those who attempt to impress with big professorial words. While such language may seem "indubitably" clear and appropriate to them, it strikes the rest of us as more than a bit eccentric. The trick here is to achieve the authoritative and persuasive effects of formality and intellectualism without sounding too, well, formal or intellectual. What you are aiming for is an effect: you want to be regarded as the smartest authority in the room but without the least trace of awkwardness or pretension. And to that end, I present to you this book. Whether it be for writing or speaking, I think you will find it quite helpful.

A Few Words About Me

I began writing what would become this book when I decided, in the spring of 2006, to go back to school and complete my education. It was there in Cambridge that I would come to realize just how inarticulate I really was. And because I could find no easy way to lift my speech and prose quickly, I resolved to invent a way. It began simply enough; whenever I would happen upon an eloquent word or phrase, I would write it down and pair it with what I would have said otherwise. (All those common word entries you see in this thesaurus? That's me talking.) I did this for years, collecting words like butterflies, until it became increasingly apparent that my collection could be of use to others. So you could say that my authority on this subject stems not only from a determination to do something about my own predicament, but to do something about yours. My only hope is that this remarkable collection of words does as much for you in that regard as it has for me.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents
Acknowledgments vii
On Becoming Articulate 1
Rhetorical Form and Design 5
Lesson 1: T. S Eliot 6
Lesson 2: Margaret Atwood 9
Lesson 3: Ernest Hemingway 11
Lesson 4: Cormac McCarthy 14
Lesson 5: John Steinbeck 16
Lesson 6: Norman Mailer 18
Lesson 7: Edith Wharton 20
Lesson 8: E. B. White 22
Lesson 9: J. M. Coetzee 24
Lesson 10: John Steinbeck 26
Lesson 11: Barbara Kingsolver 28
Lesson 12: Joshua Ferris 30
Lesson 13: Ken Kesey 32
Lesson 14: Martin Luther King, Jr 34
Lesson 15: Henry James 36
Lesson 16: Barack Obama 39
Lesson 17: Cintra Wilson 41
The Well-Spoken Vocabulary 43
The Seven Rhetorical Sins 47
How This Book Works 51
Preamble 53
The Well-Spoken Thesaurus 55
200 Well-Spoken Alternatives to Common Words and Phrases 384
About the Author 392

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 6, 2011

    Informative and fun!

    I find this reference book to be enjoyable reading as well; it's easy to assimilate the information because the book is written in a friendly, conversational tone.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2011

    Amusing

    I enjoy stumbling across these fun finds! Very well done.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 26, 2012

    Save yourself the $12 and just use your Macbook's thesaurus.

    Save yourself the $12 and just use your Macbook's thesaurus.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2012

    Super

    WONDERFUL! AMAZING! AWESOME PUSSUM!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)