We're Dead, Come on in

( 3 )

Overview

In January 1932, ten local lawmen approached two brothers in an isolated Missouri farmhouse. Minutes later, six officers were dead (the highest number of law enforcement officers killed on a single day until September 11, 2001), three were wounded, and the outlaws escaped. After a wild car chase through Oklahoma and across Texas, police finally surrounded Harry and Jennings Young in their Houston hideout. The brutal killings attracted national press (at first Pretty Boy Floyd was rumored to be involved), and ...

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Overview

In January 1932, ten local lawmen approached two brothers in an isolated Missouri farmhouse. Minutes later, six officers were dead (the highest number of law enforcement officers killed on a single day until September 11, 2001), three were wounded, and the outlaws escaped. After a wild car chase through Oklahoma and across Texas, police finally surrounded Harry and Jennings Young in their Houston hideout. The brutal killings attracted national press (at first Pretty Boy Floyd was rumored to be involved), and these events are still debated in southern Missouri today.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781589803268
  • Publisher: Pelican Publishing Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/28/2005
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 1,015,922
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Bruce Davis, a third-generation Methodist minister from Springfield, Missouri, became fascinated with this forgotten case after noticing a memorial to the six fallen police officers in his local police station. He has devoted this account to telling the whole story and honoring the brave lawmen who died in their attempts to exact justice. This is his first book.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 8, 2009

    Good Missouri History on Crime

    Purchased as a gift for a person who loves reading/researching crime in Missouri history. The book was well received and the person liked it very much. It helped associate to a time and place that we only hear about. Gave a lot of details.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2006

    Excellent book on the worst law enforcement disaster pre-9/11

    Bruce Davis, a former Springfield, Missouri, minister, has crafted a fascinating new account about Greene County, Missouri's Young Brothers Massacre (January 2, 1932). Whereas a number of books on this topic already exist, Davis' work is far more extensive and more desireable. I just wish that an index existed for all those vivid memories within this work. The author brings to the pages previously unpublished photographs, newspaper accounts, interviews, and court information. Davis holds the reader's attention throughout the work. January 2, 1932 opened with Sheriff Marcel Hendrix's decision to arrest several criminals on the same day, and the horrific consequences of the second arrest attempt. The author also answers a lot of questions about the lives of Harry and Jennings Young with superb biographical information. The Young family, the two brothers' lifestyles, and their crime histories all receive noteworthy mention. Of greater import, Davis provides an extensive amount of biographical information about the six law enforcement officers whose deaths near Brookline, Missouri, were a shock to the community. Perhaps the most compelling portion of the work, however, is the manhunt for the killers, the final confrontation, and the sensitive discussion of the funerals. Crime history scholars will appreciate this work because it is loaded with footnoted research sources. General interest readers will discover that the text is fast-paced and fascinating, inspiring a desire to read the entire volume in one sitting. 'We're Dead: Come on In' is the best book on this topic and is likely to retain this reputation.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2006

    Well worth it if you are into 30's crime.

    I found this book quite by accident at the local B&N. I am into 30's crime and live in Missouri. This is a case I never heard of. The book goes into great detail about the emotions surrounding southwest Missouri, after the killing of six police officers. it is also a glimpse into that forgotten era of the 1930's. The Young Brothers Harry and Jennings were not famous by any means but they were just as deadly. It also gives the attitude of the brother's mother which his not surprising. 'It wasn't my son's fault.' How many times have I heard that one?

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