We've Got Issues: Children and Parents in the Age of Medication [NOOK Book]

Overview

A bold, brilliant, and provocative look at childhood medication by New York Times bestselling author Judith Warner



In Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety, the bestselling author and former New York Times columnist Judith Warner explained what's gone wrong with the culture of parenting, and her conclusions sparked a national debate on how women and society ...
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We've Got Issues: Children and Parents in the Age of Medication

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Overview

A bold, brilliant, and provocative look at childhood medication by New York Times bestselling author Judith Warner



In Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety, the bestselling author and former New York Times columnist Judith Warner explained what's gone wrong with the culture of parenting, and her conclusions sparked a national debate on how women and society view motherhood. Her new book, We've Got Issues: Children and Parents in the Age of Medication, will generate the same kind of controversy, as she tackles a subject that's just as contentious and important: Are parents and physicians too quick to prescribe medication to control our children's behavior? Are we using drugs to excuse inept parents who can't raise their children properly?



What Warner discovered from the extensive research and interviewing she did for this book is that passion on both sides of the issue "is ideological and only tangentially about real children," and she cuts through the jargon and hysteria to delve into a topic that for millions of parents involves one of the most important decisions they'll ever make for their child.



Insightful, compelling, and deeply moving, We've Got Issues is for parents, doctors, and teachers-anyone who cares about the welfare of today's children.


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Editorial Reviews

NPR - Alix Spiegel
“Warner ultimately does a good job of explaining just how complicated these issues are. It’s interesting to be in her company as she successfully sorts through a mass of apparently contradictory material about kids and drugs.”
—Alix Spiegel, NPR science correspondent
From the Publisher
“Warner ultimately does a good job of explaining just how complicated these issues are. It’s interesting to be in her company as she successfully sorts through a mass of apparently contradictory material about kids and drugs.”
—Alix Spiegel, NPR science correspondent
NPR
Warner ultimately does a good job of explaining just how complicated these issues are. It’s interesting to be in her company as she successfully sorts through a mass of apparently contradictory material about kids and drugs.
—Alix Spiegel, NPR science correspondent
Library Journal
The very passion driving Warner's (www.judithwarneronline.com) examination of mental health issues among children mars her contribution to the national dialog. Alternately eloquent and overwrought, her fourth nonfiction book—following the New York Times best seller Perfect Madness (2005)—combines multiple objectives that would have been better tackled individually: it is at once a survey of the contemporary U.S. child psychology environment, a child psychology primer, and apologia for Perfect Madness. Warner rails against the societal prejudices against kids stigmatized by mental illness and includes dramatic anecdotes from parents. Yet this is less a practical parenting manual than an overlong, subjective think piece on the relative merits and effectiveness of prescribing medicine for mental illness. Actress/narrator Kirsten Potter's (www.kirstenpotter.com) cool gravity cannot overcome the overexcited writing. Appropriate only where audio serves as a needed alternative to print. [See Prepub Exploded, BookSmack!, 9/1/09.—Ed.]—Douglas C. Lord, Connecticut State Lib., Middletown
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101185353
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 2/23/2010
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 915,119
  • File size: 352 KB

Meet the Author

Judith Warner is the author of the New York Times bestselling Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety and Hillary Clinton: The Inside Story, as well as several other books. She writes the Domestic Disturbances column for the New York Times website and is a former special correspondent for Newsweek in Paris. She lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband and their children.
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Table of Contents

Preface 1

1 UNTITLED on Affluent Parents and Neurotic Kids 7

2 Seeing Is Believing 31

3 An Epidemic of Supposition 49

4 Aren't They All on Medication? 65

5 Who, Exactly, Is Having Issues? 91

6 "B-a-d" Children, Worse Parents (and Even Worse Doctors) 117

7 Stuck in the Cuckoo's Nest 145

8 Ritalin Nation? 171

9 The Stories We Tell 191

10 A "Better Time Than Ever" 209

11 Moving Forward 233

Acknowledgments 251

Notes 253

Bibliography 303

Index 309

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 6, 2010

    We've Got Issues: A Conversation with NYTimes Journalist and Author Judith Warner

    Judith will be speaking on an online radio show at Fem2.0 with Lindsay Reed Maines from RockandRollMama.com over at http://www.talkshoe.com/tc/74229. You can ask questions and listen in on your phone or computer.

    The description:

    Are parents and physicians too quick to prescribe medication to control our children's behavior? Are we using drugs to excuse inept parents who can't raise their children properly? In her new book, We've Got Issues, Judith Warner, NY Times journalist and best-selling author of Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety, cuts through the passion on both sides of an issue that "is ideological and only tangentially about real children," to arrive at some surprising conclusions. Lindsay Reed Maines, freelance journalist and blogger at RollandRollMama.com, moderates this interactive discussion with Warner about modern parenting, medication, and children "with issues."

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  • Posted April 22, 2010

    We've Got Issues

    I won an advanced copy of this book.

    I was rather disappointed when I first started this book. Maybe I misinterpreted the summary but I expected a book about the misuse of medication today. In the first couple chapters the author talks about having that same view of mental illness and starting out to write a book exposing this misuse but then changes her mind and begins work on the book as it is today. The book goes back and forth with information to back up both sides of the argument. Several times she states that she couldn't find any cases of people misusing medication but then talks about interviews with people who have written articles about these cases. She says all of the parents she talked with came to the conclusion to medicate their children slowly and after much doubt. It seems that she either was leaving out some stories or she just wasn't looking hard enough.

    On the other hand, I really enjoyed reading the book. The entire book was filled with tons of stories, statistics, interviews, and evidence supporting both sides of a very controversial argument. I learned a lot from the information she provided and especially enjoyed the last couple of chapters. I liked the last chapter in which she discussed things that need to be done to help the public in better understanding mental illness.

    While I enjoyed the reading and learned a lot from all of the information throughout, I didn't feel the author did a very good job of convincing the reader of her point or she just didn't make her point very clear among the contradicting evidence. I feel I have the same opinion I did when I began reading the book with more information to back up my ideas and a lot more compassion for those people who are suffering from mental illness.

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  • Posted April 9, 2010

    For anyone who was a child in the last 20 years...

    A big surprise - our children are NOT overdrugged by whacko parents - who would have thought? Apparently Judith's original proposal was an expose about all the drugs that our children are being given, but discovered that they aren't.

    As someone married to a speech therapist who deals with children all day - the book rings true. Many parents are so overwhelmed by the maze of dealing with emotional disorders, and terrified of their child being "labelled", that they don't get their kids the treatment they need.

    A great, eye opening book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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