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What a Great Idea! Inventions That Changed the World
     

What a Great Idea! Inventions That Changed the World

by Stephen M. Tomecek, Steve Tomecek, Dan Stuckenschneider (Illustrator)
 

Steve Tomecek discusses 45 inventions that really shook up society. These big ideas inspired many other inventions and illuminate the changes that technology has made throughout time.

From the hand ax and mathematics to IC chips and the laser, each technological touchstone in human history is described and placed in historical context. Each profile includes the

Overview

Steve Tomecek discusses 45 inventions that really shook up society. These big ideas inspired many other inventions and illuminate the changes that technology has made throughout time.

From the hand ax and mathematics to IC chips and the laser, each technological touchstone in human history is described and placed in historical context. Each profile includes the who (if we know it), how the idea developed and how it works, the immediate impact of the idea, and the technological 'children' of the idea. The time span is 3500 BC to today. The author closes with an epilogue that looks into the future, a bibliography, and a list of great Web sites for young inventors.
Realistic, 4-color paintings, in technical drawing style, showcase the idea and its applications by humans.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
From something as simple as the hand ax to the more complex nuclear reactor, inventions that made life easier for man and changed the course of human history are examined in this lively and informative book. Arranged in chronological order from the Ancient world to the present, the problem that needed to be solved (in the case of the spear, how to extract tasty morsels from the ground), and the resulting invention are described, as well as how it works, its impact on society, and other related developments. (for example, the spear led to the hammer, hatchet, ax). Some may challenge the inclusion of the growth of cities, art, and farming as not being true inventions, but the author does connect their growth to the advancement of civilization. As the world became more complex, ingenuity and genius led to incredible breakthroughs in science and medicine. Every attempt has been made to make each entry informative and understandable, not to mention fun. Each invention relies on the previous, and children will easily follow this evolutionary pattern. Highly readable and crisply designed, this is a book that will thoroughly engage budding scientists. In keeping with the book's theme, the illustrations were created in mixed media and Photoshop. 2003, Scholastic,
— Beverly Fahey
VOYA
This book is truly a great idea. The presentation of the tapestry of inventions interwoven with the impact and offshoots of these inventions is unique for a book on inventions. This tribute to human ingenuity beginning with prehistoric time moves from the selected historic invention to more recent legacies from that invention. For example, the first waterwheel with a vertical shaft led to the more familiar wheels requiring gears; Marconi invented the radio to send telegraphic messages without wires; and the modern computer can be traced back to Charles Babbage's device to count numbers in 1822. The selections are organized into five chapters that span the ancient world to the age of the atom and include diverse ideas from abacus and dugout to computer and nuclear reactor. This interdisciplinary approach connects the transition from hunter/gatherer to farming with the evolution of cities and the marketplace, necessitating measurements in construction and commerce. The eye-catching illustrations will entice even non-science oriented students to browse this selection of inventions that have had an impact on the world. Social studies and technology classes as well as science classes will benefit from this book. The conclusion invites students both to acknowledge human ability to change the world around them and to question negative consequences of an invention. If one is looking for details, this book will not suffice, but if a focus on the significance of an invention appeals to a reader, this title is superb. It gets a thumbs-up for both educators and students. Index. Illus. Biblio. Further Reading. VOYA CODES: 5Q 4P M J S (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Broad general YAappeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2003, Scholastic, 112p,
— Marilyn Brien
School Library Journal
Gr 5-9-This handsome survey examines 45 discoveries that have had a technical, political, artistic, or spiritual impact on humankind. Drawing on archaeological evidence and historical record, the author places each invention in the context of its time and notes developments it has spawned. Precise diagrams demystify scientific concepts. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780590681445
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/02/2003
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
8.54(w) x 10.48(h) x 0.53(d)
Lexile:
IG1250L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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