What about Bear?

What about Bear?

by Suzanne Bloom
     
 

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Who will fix the friendship? It's playtime and Bear and Goose are having fun. Then Little Fox joins in and somebody gets left out. Sound familiar? The dilemma of choosing one friend over another is one of childhood's classic problems. Someone's feelings are bound to get hurt. But as this gentle story shows, the solution lies in including friends, not excluding

Overview


Who will fix the friendship? It's playtime and Bear and Goose are having fun. Then Little Fox joins in and somebody gets left out. Sound familiar? The dilemma of choosing one friend over another is one of childhood's classic problems. Someone's feelings are bound to get hurt. But as this gentle story shows, the solution lies in including friends, not excluding them. As in her previous Bear and Goose stories, Suzanne Bloom's latest book deals with a familiar aspect of friendship: being left out.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Artfully uses body language rather than text (which runs to fewer than 100 words) to crank up the emotional intensity. . . . Another splendid outing, indeed." --Kirkus Reviews

"Little listeners will identify with Bear's reaction to Fox's arrival and unfair exclusion and to cheer on Goose's defense of his big furry friend." --Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

* "Fans of Goose and Bear from A Splendid Friend, Indeed (2005) and Treasure (2007, both Boyds Mills) will enjoy having them back." --School Library Journal, starred review

Kirkus Reviews
A small red fox joins playmates Goose and Polar Bear, introduced in A Splendid Friend, Indeed (2005)-setting up a "three's a crowd" conflict that even the still-diapered set will quickly recognize. Initial shyness dissipating quickly, Fox repeatedly announces "I want to play a new game." But Fox's hopscotch squares are too small for Bear, checkers is a two-player game and the telescope is a one-at-a-time sort of toy. Off Bear stomps in a huff, leaving Goose to make a choice. As before, Bloom poses shaggy figures against a rich blue color field and artfully uses body language rather than text (which runs to fewer than 100 words) to crank up the emotional intensity. Fox's sharp nose and bushy tail are particularly eloquent at expressing bossiness, lonely remorse after Bear and Goose depart and relief after Fox is invited back into the fold ("Bear is my big, old, sometimes grumpy friend," says Goose. "You can be our new friend") and curls up in Bear's lap to share a book. Another splendid outing, indeed. (Picture book. 3-6)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Bloom's splendid friends Bear and Goose return with a humorous lesson about making new friends without losing the old ones. When Bear and Goose are happily playing, a small fox asks to join them. But then he wants to play different games, activities that he says Bear cannot join. Goose does not want his friend to leave. So, "What about me?" asks the fox. "You can be our new friend," says Goose. And they can all play together. Bloom uses just a few words in large type, leaving the large double pages free for the three appealing characters. Pastels create a textured, rather unkempt polar bear, sensitive despite his size. Goose is the clown, whose facial expressions and body gestures aided by his acrobatic neck keep the games going. The small reddish fox is the superficially innocent, doll-like newcomer to the action. There is a visual elegance to this trio that makes the brief text almost redundant. Do not overlook the endpapers. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Just when Goose and Bear are finally getting the hang of friendship, Little Fox comes along and wants to play too. Unfortunately Little Fox seems determined to leave Bear out, declaring him "too big," "too grumpy," and finally "too far away." Loyal, sensitive Goose boldly stands up for Bear, insisting that if Fox wants to play, the newcomer must learn to play with Bear as well. Bright and cuddly illustrations done in pastels are so rich with texture that readers will want to reach out and touch them. Movement and expression in the characters are beautifully rendered and bring a lot of spirit and humor to the easy-to-read text. Fans of Goose and Bear from A Splendid Friend, Indeed (2005) and Treasure (2007, both Boyds Mills) will enjoy having them back.—Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590789131
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
10/01/2012
Series:
Goose and Bear stories Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
758,470
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
BR (what's this?)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

Meet the Author


Suzanne Bloom is a winner of a Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor for A Splendid Friend, Indeed. She is the author and illustrator of many books for children. She lives with her family in McDonough, New York.

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