What Color Is Your Parachute? 2001: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers

What Color Is Your Parachute? 2001: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers

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by Richard N. Bolles
     
 

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What Color is Your Parachute? has been Ten Speed's best-selling book for nearly three decades, and it continues to be the job-hunter's bible—even in times of a strong, robust economy, when conventional wisdom says "Job-hunting books don't sell." Parachute is a fixture on best-seller lists, from amazon.com to Business Week; has well over six million

Overview

What Color is Your Parachute? has been Ten Speed's best-selling book for nearly three decades, and it continues to be the job-hunter's bible—even in times of a strong, robust economy, when conventional wisdom says "Job-hunting books don't sell." Parachute is a fixture on best-seller lists, from amazon.com to Business Week; has well over six million copies in print; and exists in ten languages around the world.

For those who have not read an updated version in recent years, here is a reminder of why, in the words of Fortune magazine, "Parachute remains the gold standard of career guides": Parachute is always current and up to date, with tips about job-hunting on the Internet being the latest evidence of this.

It works in conjunction with a Web site, www.JobHuntersBible.com, and a companion book by the same author, Job-Hunting on the Internet. It discusses what has changed about the job market, and the new attitudes that are required in order to survive therein. It aids career-changers, as well as job-hunters, and has a detailed step-by-step plan for identifying a new career, as well as more detailed strategies for locating just the job you want in the geographical area of your choice. It has a detailed description of interview questions, and what kinds of answers the employer is looking for, plus salary negotiation strategies.

About the Author:
Richard Nelson Bolles is the author of the best-selling job-hunting book in the world, What Color is Your Parachute?, in addition to numerous other job-hunting books. He lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781580082426
Publisher:
Ten Speed Press
Publication date:
10/01/2000
Series:
What Color Is Your Parachute Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.95(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 2: Rejection Shock

We begin with a simple fact: our whole job-hunting system is Neanderthal. That's why, in the U.S., there are currently over six million people out of work, even in the best of economic times.

Year after year this so-called system fails one job-hunter after another, condemns man after man, woman after woman, to go down the same path, face the same problems, make the same mistakes, endure the same frustrations, go through the same loneliness, and end up feeling as though there is something wrong with them. It knows only one goal: to go after known vacancies. And it offers only three ways to do this: sending out or posting one's resume, answering newspaper ads or job postings, and going to employment agencies. Strategies which have spectacularly low success rates.

Consequently, year after year this system forces millions of us to remain unemployed after months and months of jobhunting, or — if we find a job — to end up underemployed, in the wrong field, at the wrong job, doing the wrong tasks, well below the peak of our abilities.

It doesn't matter what you do: you can send your resume out by the bushels, hang it from every tree on the Internet, read every ad, go to every agency, contact every search firm — only to discover after a lengthy period of time that none of this works for you, and you are still unemployed.

Rejection Shock

When — and if — this happens to you, you will find yourself feeling as though you're experiencing some kind of "Rejection Shock." It's a kind of personal psychological Shock, characterized by a slow or rapid erosion of your self-image, and the conviction thatthere is something wrong with you, leading to lower expectations, depression, desperation, and despair. This can assume, consequently, all the proportions of a major crisis in your life, your personal relations and your family, leading to withdrawal (often), estrangement (frequently), where divorce is often a consequence and even suicide is not unthinkable. My first introduction to this was when the front page of our local newspaper described a job-hunter who put a plastic bag over his head, leaving a suicide note that said "Even a genius can't find a job." (He was a member of Mensa.) It's bad enough not to be able to find a job. But add to that, this feeling of Rejection, and . . . Yuck! Most of us hate rejection. We dedicate a large part of our lives to avoiding it — when dating, when proposing new ideas, and so forth. We'll even reject others first, if we think they're about to reject us. We'll do anything to avoid rejection, and I mean anything. As we grow older, we become pretty good at throwing Rejection out of our lives. But then, along comes the job-hunt. Eight times in our lifetime (usually) we have to go through this painful process. And, except at its very end, it is nothing but a process of rejection. My friend Tom Jackson (in his Guerrilla Tactics in the Job Market) has aptly captured this, in this depressingly accurate description of a typical job-hunt, as you go to employer after employer, asking, "Will you hire me...

Meet the Author

Richard Nelson Bolles is acknowledged as "America's top career expert" by Modern Maturity magazine, "the one responsible for the renaissance of the career counseling profession in the United States over the past decade" by Money magazine, and "the most widely read and influential leader in the whole career planning field" by the U.S. Law Placement Association.

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on March 19, 1927, Richard grew up in Teaneck, New Jersey. He served in the U.S. Navy and worked as a messenger on Wall Street before attending the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University (BS in physics). Bolles also holds a master's degree in New Testament studies from the General Theological Seminary in New York City and has received two honorary doctorates.

In December, 1970, he self-published What Color is Your Parachute? using a local copy shop in downtown San Francisco. The book had its first commercial edition published in November, 1972, by Ten Speed Press. Revised and updated annually since 1975 (rewritten completely in 1992 and 1997), Parachute has been on the New York Times Bestseller list (paperback) over 300 weeks.

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What Color Is Your Parachute? 2001 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Once I made up my mind where my strengths were, I used this book like a roadmap to get that job...even in a 'bad economy.' I did get some counseling first, to help me zero in on the job I wanted to go after. It was really helpful and made the search pay off.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Whether you were laid off or are looking for your first job you will find this book helpful. It got me thinking about my job and career in a new way and ultimately I decided to change professions. For once, I look forward to going to the office.