What Color Is Your Parachute? 2011: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers

Overview

What Color Is Your Parachute? is the world's most popular job-hunting guide, with 10 million copies sold, in more than 20 languages. Written by career guru Richard N. Bolles-who coined the terms "informational interviewing" and "transferable skills"-this New York Times and Business Week best seller answers such questions as:

"What are the FIVE BEST-and worst-ways to search for a job?" See chapter 3 (starting on page 31).

"What are the most helpful job sites on the INTERNET, out of the thousands that are out ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (11) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $33.50   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$33.50
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(357)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$36.65
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: New
2010 Hardcover New in new dust jacket. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able ... to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

Ships from: SHEFFIELD, United Kingdom

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

What Color Is Your Parachute? is the world's most popular job-hunting guide, with 10 million copies sold, in more than 20 languages. Written by career guru Richard N. Bolles-who coined the terms "informational interviewing" and "transferable skills"-this New York Times and Business Week best seller answers such questions as:

"What are the FIVE BEST-and worst-ways to search for a job?" See chapter 3 (starting on page 31).

"What are the most helpful job sites on the INTERNET, out of the thousands that are out there?" See pages 53-54.

"What INTERVIEW QUESTIONS can I expect to be asked, and how do I answer them?" See chapter 6 (starting on page 93).

"I want to use a RESUME. What should I include?" See chapter 5 (starting on page 71).

"I haven't a clue how to do SALARY NEGOTIATION. Help!" See chapter 7 (starting on page 121).

"There are no jobs out there, so I'm thinking of STARTING MY OWN BUSINESS. Where do I begin?" See chapter 9 (starting on page 147).

"Since I'm out of work, I'd like to use this opportunity to find more PURPOSE and sense of mission in my next job. How do I do that?" See pages 15, 179, and 269.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Ten million copies later, What Color Is Your Parachute is still flying high. In fact, Richard Bolles' annual practical guide for job-hunters and would-be career switchers has never been more timely: Every one from recent high school and college graduates to baby boomers who can no longer afford to retire are looking for the real-world help that this trustworthy manual provides. This year's updated edition contains 368 pages of advice that few counselors have the time to offer. Think of it as an investment. (Hand-selling tip: This breakaway favorite was first released in a self-published edition in 1970.)
From the Publisher
What Color Is Your Parachute is deservedly the world’s most popular job hunting book…. This 2011 edition is as relevant today as when it was first published. Dick Bolles insightfully stays on the cutting edge of job searching and the book is full of new and updated suggestions, along with the classic advice that continues to hold true today.”
--Alison Doyle, About.com Job Search Guide

“If I were job hunting, I would pick up a copy of this book without hesitation.”
--FOXBusiness.com, 8/25/10

“There’s Parachute, and then there’s all the rest. . . . A life-changing book.”
--Career Planning and Adult Development Journal
 
Parachute is still a top seller and it remains the go-to guide for everyone from midlife-crisis boomers looking to change their careers to college students looking to start one.”
--New York Post
 
What Color Is Your Parachute? is about job-hunting and career-changing, but it’s also about figuring out who you are as a person and what you want out of life.”
--Time

“Ideally, everyone should read What Color Is Your Parachute? in the tenth grade and again every year thereafter.”
--Anne Fisher, Fortune
 
“It was one of the first job-hunting books on the market. It is still arguably the best. And it is indisputably the most popular.” 
--Fast Company

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781580082679
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press
  • Publication date: 8/17/2010
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

RICHARD N. BOLLES has led the career development field for more than 35 years. A member of Mensa and the Society for Human Resource Management, he has been the keynote speaker at hundreds of conferences. Bolles holds a bachelor’s degree cum laude in physics from Harvard University, a master’s degree from General Theological (Episcopal) Seminary in New York City, and three honorary doctorates.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

1. There Are Always Jobs Out There
 
The job-market is a mess, right now. People have lost jobs they thought would go on forever. Whole households have been plunged into financial ruin. Hunting for a job is like looking for a needle in a haystack. The future, to many people, looks bleak. Welcome to “Normal.”
 
Yes, this is what always happens after a Recession. It’s just been  worse, this time, because this has been a bad Recession. Really really bad. There’s still a tremendous amount of misery, out there. When you talk to those who are unemployed, as I do constantly, you feel the kind of pain that strikes at the very heart of why people want to live. Or not live. So many souls are living quiet lives of desperation. Their job is gone. Their home is gone. Their dreams are gone. Their savings are gone. Their plans for retirement are gone. Their hope is gone. And they feel heartbroken, abandoned, forgotten. To see what disastrous events in the economy, like a Recession, or disastrous events in nature, like the Gulf oil spill, have done to so many people’s lives, is to weep. You hear discouragement and despair, on every side:
 
“There are no jobs out there, I know, I looked. I went on the Internet every single day. After two months, I gave up.”
 
“I’m hearing all the experts say we are entering into a jobless recovery. They say some people are just going to have to get used to being permanently unemployed. I think they’re right. I can see a grim future ahead for me. It is the death of all my dreams; all I’ll have after this is a series of regrets.”
 
“I heard there are six people out of work for every vacancy that appears; those odds mean my situation is hopeless.”
 
“With the labor market so tough for the foreseeable future, even if I find a job, I imagine it will have to be one that I settle for; there is no hope of my ever finding work that I could feel passionate about, or find anything remotely approaching a ‘dream job.’”
 
“I always thought you were supposed to start your job-hunt by learning all you can about the job-market: what the hot jobs are, what vacancies are posted by employers on the Internet, and so on. I was taught that you have to take the job-market as the given, and then try to depict yourself as one who matches that given. But with this awful recession we are just coming out of, this doesn’t seem to work at all. Employers simply aren’t posting any vacancies. Hot jobs are nonexistent. I’m thoroughly bummed out.”
 
These, and similar sentiments, circulate in the media in the air, and in the blogosphere, 24/7.
 
All we want, now, is relief. We want the government to do something. And create jobs. Don’t just sit there; do something! And we will sweep out of power any government that does not make Jobs their number one priority, and come to our rescue.
 
How Jobs Get Created
The unfortunate news is that Recessions--not this bad, but bad enough--come around regularly in history, and recovery from them always works the same way: it is not the government, or employers who pull us out of our tailspin. No, it is the consumer who re-creates the job-market (and therefore “jobs”) after a Recession ends; but right now--after getting all banged up from what we have just been through--we consumers are basically operating in Cautious mode. That’s normal. If we have any money we consumers are first using it for other things than consuming, as is our custom whenever we come out of a Recession.
 
We are using our income first of all to pay off any debt we have; and then, to cut down our addiction to credit cards; and then if any money is left over we are using it to build up a safety net for ourselves, setting aside more into our savings. And only then, do we--will we--get back to spending at the levels we did before the Recession. (And thus create jobs and restore the job-market to the size it used to be, or more.) It’s going to take a while. Maybe a long while. Meanwhile, the job-market remains weakened, and good news comes only in fits and starts.
 
Of course, to know that all of this is “normal” after any Recession, is small comfort indeed to those of us who have been set adrift on the Sea of Despair. We’ve been trying all the things that used to work, except they don’t anymore. We used to troll the Internet to find interesting vacancies; now, no interesting vacancies are there (to our eyes, anyway). We used to look for employers who were hiring people with our job-title; now, our job-title seems to have vanished. We used to send out our resume by the bushels, and get interested responses; now, there is just the sound of silence. And we used to brush up on our interviewing skills, so as to win the day with a prospective employer; now, no employer even wants to see us.
 
In all of this, I exaggerate, of course. It isn’t that bad for everybody. But for many of us it is as bleak as I have just described it. For example, some six and a half million of us here in the U.S. have been out of work for twenty-seven weeks or more, as I write. That’s almost half of all the official unemployed, the worst figures since records began to be kept, back in 1948.
 
The Good News
On the other hand, millions of job-hunters have found jobs this year, in spite of everything, as we are going to see. And I want to help you join them. I am writing this to give you hope about your future, and to help you chart a winning path for yourself, out of this mess.
 
So, let’s begin with a description of what the job-market is really doing, at the moment, not what the media say it is. Let’s begin with the truth that there are always jobs out there. Maybe not exactly the ones you are looking for,  maybe not exactly where you would hope they would be, maybe not as easy to find as they were in good times--but they are out there. You have to be convinced of that, before it makes any sense to start looking. So, how do we know this?
 
Well, to begin with, simple logic will tell you there just have to be job vacancies out there. After all, at least 138 million people in the U.S. do have jobs; and they need (and can pay for) services, products, food, clothing, shelter, and transportation. Not to mention, travel (so long as a volcano doesn’t get in the way), recreation, vacations, hobbies, games, and amusements. Someone’s got to provide these for them. That creates jobs.
 
In addition, some of those 138 million workers die, retire, move, fall sick, get restless, get fed up and change careers; so there just have to be vacancies opening up, constantly.
 
Simple logic tells us that.
 
But to put a floor under that logic, there are continuing studies of the job-market’s actual behavior. And according to the experts, during the decade 1994-2004, in good times or bad, fifteen million jobs disappeared each year in the U.S., but seventeen million new jobs got created, each year.1
 
But doesn’t all this change during, and after, a Recession? I mean, look at the monthly Unemployment Figure. It’s been dreadful. It adds up to 8.4 million jobs that have disappeared since the Recession began.
 
Well, I’m glad you mentioned that Figure. It has led to more mischief in people’s understanding of what’s going on, than I can possibly tell you. Part of the problem is its title. Instead of calling it “the unemployment figure” we would be far better off if we called it “The Relative Size of the Employed U.S. Workforce.” Once a month, after the end of each month, the government does something like a “sounding” (think Mississippi riverboat) to measure the size of the employed workforce at the end of that month. They then subtract that figure from the figure at the end of the month before that, and tell you if the employed workforce has shrunk or grown overall that month, and by how much. If the workforce has grown, that means there has been a net number of jobs added that month to the U.S. workforce, and the government will tell you how many. On the other hand, if it’s shrunk, then obviously jobs have vanished that month; and again the government will tell you how many. And that’s the figure these past two or three years that has been causing job-hunters, the media, and the government to wring their hands, or lapse into depression and despair. With good cause, I might add.
 
What Happens During the Month?
But--and this is crucial--it is only a net figure computed once a month, at the end of the month, after all the dust has settled. Ah, and there’s the rub. A lot can happen during the month, in between the “soundings.” And does! To find out exactly what, the government (fortunately for us) maintains a site for exactly that purpose, which is cutely called “JOLT” (for Job Openings & Labor Turnover), and is to be found at the Bureau of Labor Statistics website at www.bls.gov/jlt.
 
Now, you’re probably not going to take the trouble to go there, so let me summarize for you what it has reported for the past twelve months (at this writing), and I’ll precede it, for each month, with the monthly “sounding,” traditionally called “The Monthly Unemployment Figure,” but as I mentioned earlier, should be called “The Relative Size of the Employed U.S. Workforce.” Okay, here goes:
 
February 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 726,000 people, since the end of the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported, during that month 4,360,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 3,006,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
March 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 753,000 people, since the end of the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported, during that month 4,172,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,717,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
April 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 528,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported,  during that month 4,099,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,633,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
May 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 387,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported, during that month 3,980,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,554,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
June 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 515,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported, during that month 3,776,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,558,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
July 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 346,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported,  during that month 4,059,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,392,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
August 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 212,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported,  during that month 4,029,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,387,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
September 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 225,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported, during that month 4,010,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,480,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
October 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 224,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported, during that month 3,966,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,506,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
November 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had grown by 64,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported, during that month 4,176,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,415,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
December 2009
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had shrunk by 109,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported, during that month 4,073,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,497,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
 
There are always vacancies out there, jobs waiting to be filled; our problem lies in how we go about looking for them.
 
January 2010
By the end of that month, the overall size of the employed U.S. Workforce had grown by 14,000 people, since the previous month. During the month, jobs were lost, jobs were found, but the net change at the end of the month was the figure above.
 
But as JOLT reported, during that month 4,080,000 people found jobs.
And at the end of that month, 2,724,000 vacancies remained unfilled.
 
 
Yeah, I know. All of that made your head hurt. And I know you’re bright, and you certainly got the point by the third month, above; but I droned on, because I wanted to convince you that this can’t be explained away as only happening for a month or two. This never changes, month in, month out: even in the worst of economic times there are always vacancies out there, jobs waiting to be filled; our problem lies in where they are, what they are, and how we go about looking for them.
 
During and following a Recession, the methods we use successfully to find a job when times are good--sending out resumes, plying the Internet looking for job postings from employers--don’t work very well at all when times are tough. We need new strategies, new thinking. That’s what this book is about. A lot of people are finding jobs; why shouldn’t you be among them?
 
Enough Jobs for Everyone?
The media have made much, this past year or two, of the fact that someone calculated there are six or so people out of work for every vacancy that opens up. That is a huge societal problem; it raises the spectre of the possibility that as a nation, the U.S. (and other countries) may have an underclass of permanently unemployed people--for all the foreseeable future. What that may mean in terms of social unrest, general discontent, political divisiveness, and just plain unfairness in the way the workplace discriminates, will inevitably play itself out in the years to come. And somehow it simply cannot be ignored.
 
But there will never be enough jobs in this country for those who want them, and there never have been. Even at the height of the  prosperous time prior to this Recession, there were eight million people in the U.S. who couldn’t find jobs. Currently, that figure is around seventeen million. That’s awful; after all, there were “only” thirteen million people out of work during the Great Depression.
 
As I said, this is a huge problem for our whole society, and for any government in power. But as far as its implications for your destiny as an individual job-hunter are concerned, the situation is quite different. The implication that has been falsely drawn from this, has run something like this: Hey, you never had to compete for a job before, but now you’re going to have to.
 
This is just plain nuts. As I said, even before this Recession, when times were prosperous, there were still eight million people who couldn’t find jobs. As a country, we have never produced enough jobs for all the people who want to work, except for a brief period during World War II. In all other years we always have an unemployment rate, and even if it stands at only 4.7 percent, that’s 4.7 percent of a labor force that is now 154,000,000 in size. So, in actual numbers that works out to be seven million people who can’t find work in the best of times. (Maybe more, since the government tends to play around with these potentially explosive numbers politically speaking.)
 
In other words, you have always had to compete with other people for a job, and you always will. You need to know how to do this well. It begins by first studying Yourself, before you study the job-market and the job-hunt.
 
Conclusion
For now, I hope this is your major takeaway from this chapter:
 
Even during hard times, people in the U.S. have been finding new jobs by the millions, this month and every month. Moreover, even after that, millions of vacancies remain unfilled. Now maybe these jobs are located in a different place than where you’ve lived for just ages. And maybe the job-titles are different from what you were looking for. But somebody wants the skills you have; maybe in a different location, maybe under a different job-title. But somebody wants you.
 
All of this is an opportunity for you, if you are willing to roll up your sleeves, and spend some decent time doing some hard work figuring out where you want to go from here with your life, and then mastering job-hunting skills that are more than just elementary. You can find not just “an okay job”; you can find a piece of your dreams.
 
Why be surprised at this good news?  I’m here to tell you lots of good news. After all, this is really a Book of Hope--only masquerading as a job-hunting manual.
 
 
January 22, 2010:
 
Just wanted to say Thank You for your book, it was such an encouragement to me when I was laid off last February after nearly 25 years with the same company. I learned some practical things that seemed to help, in fact I went on four interviews in a two-month period and was offered three jobs, one because a former coworker had recommended me to the company, the others I found online. The hardest thing was deciding which one to take, but the answer was pretty clear and so now I’ve been at my new job for 6 months and it is going very well. Thanks again.
--A Former Job-Hunter
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface: In This Internet Age, Why do Job-Hunters Still Want a Printed Book? x

In Gratitude xv

A Grammar Note xix

Part I Finding a Job ...

1 There are Always Jobs Out There 3

2 Where Do I Go from Here with My Life? 15

3 Once you Know Exactly what you are Looking for 31

4 Once you Know Exactly what you are Looking for 57

5 Once you Know Exactly what you are Looking for 71

6 Once you Know Exactly what you are Looking for 93

7 Once you Know Exactly what you are Looking for 121

8 Once you Know Exactly what you are Looking for 137

9 Once you Know Exactly what you are Looking for 147

10 Once you Know Exactly what you are Looking for 167

Part II Finding a Life ...

11 The Flower Exercise 179

Do you Most want to do?

Do you Most want to Do it?

Do you Find your Ideal Job?

Appendices

Appendix A Finding your Mission in Life 269

Appendix B A Guide to Choosing a Career Coach or Counselor 288

Appendix C Sampler List of Coaches 304

About the Author 327

Index 329

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 40 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 20, 2011

    Useful if you live under a rock!

    I found this book to be pathetic at best. Thankfully, I got the thing from the library and didn't spend my dwindling savings on it. The prose is long-winded and I found myself scanning past well over half of the book. Most of it is stuff every recruiter and job hunter "expert" already spews: network for a job, present yourself well at interviews, blah, blah, blah.

    The exercises are worthless. You spend time you could be using looking for a job conducting a self-analysis to see what your ideal job is: you list everything from salary, to favorite skills/passions to where you want to live. It gets so specific that by time you are done, you have some career listed that doesn't exist. No one's going to pay me a six figure salary to read books on the beach.

    What's worse is that it asks you to list some of the marketable skills you already have. That's all great and dandy for the 40-year-old who broke into their field when there was less competition or the jack-of-all-trades. For the 24-year-old that's not even two years out of college, you come up with your crap job skills: changing old people diapers, answering telephones and customer service. If my major was employable, I wouldn't have to read this book. By the time I was done with the exercise in terms of employable skills I had....nursing home aide. Way to set me back, Bolles.

    The worst part, however, is all the blather about how his god put you on Earth to fulfill some sort of destiny and using his life changing methods will help you discover that purpose. Unless you are an uber-Christian, skip the last section of the book. It goes on and on about how our jobs should be our works for god and fulfill our deepest purpose. The problem with such grand thinking is that people lose jobs. Do they then lose their purpose and disappoint god? Not helpful to us critical thinkers and it does nothing to help any of us find a job.

    Honestly, if you really have some driving passion and feel you have a deep purpose, you'll find it just by living your life and doing what you love. If you need to read a book to find your dream job, you're not ready for it yet. Down here in the real world, someone of us need tolerable jobs just to pay the bills.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 40 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)