What Does Peace Feel Like?

What Does Peace Feel Like?

by Vladimir Radunsky
     
 

Peace.
What does that word really mean? Ask children from around the world, and this is what they say....  See more details below

Overview

Peace.
What does that word really mean? Ask children from around the world, and this is what they say....

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this timely exercise, well worth repeating in any home or school, Radunsky (Manneken Pis) interviews elementary students at the Ambrit International School in Rome. Each inviting spread addresses one of the five senses and gives the interviewees' often poetic thoughts on peace; the author/artist treats the children's answers seriously, without making them seem precious or cute. Under a large heading that asks "What does Peace look like?," the respondents imagine "new babies just born yesterday" and "something beautiful that goes away but will come back." One child suggests "a cat and a dog curled up together in a basket," and Radunsky pictures this scene in a full-spread painting; curiously, the yin-and-yang white dog and black cat do not touch or look at one another, but they do appear relaxed. Under the question "What does Peace sound like?," the children answer, "like a silent day... like everyone's heart beating, making one big sound together," and small print on the far right gives their names (from Michael to Bhavana to Finbar) and ages. The final page translates the word "peace" into almost 200 languages, implying the world population's ideals. Radunsky's sensual paintings, with their swooping gestures, smears and rousing saturated colors, complement his questions on perception (some readers might wish for more diversity in skin hues among the people pictured-or more people, period). Kindness emanates from this volume, which proposes a simple but effective experiment for contemplating peace. All ages. (Nov.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Children at the Ambrit international School in Rome were asked to comment on peace: what it smells, sounds, and tastes like; and how it looks and feels. The first names and ages of the children are listed on the page opposite the quotes. Their responses can encourage readers to add their own responses. Some are pithy, such as peace looks "like new babies just born yesterday . . . " and sounds "like no bad words." Others are more concrete, such as peace tastes "like your favorite food times two" and smells "like pizza with onions and sausage that just came out of the oven." This is a marvelous discussion-starter for home and classroom. Radunsky's illustrations, too, can be used to elicit responses from children. The word "peace" is presented in 189 languages at the back of the book. Part of the proceeds will be donated to CARE. 2004, Anne Schwartz Book/Atheneum Books for Young Readers, Ages 5 to 9.
—Sharon Salluzzo
Kirkus Reviews
Through simple words and pictures, this thought-provoking offering suggests some interesting answers to the titular question. Radunsky opens with children, adults, and one dog saying "peace" in different languages and ends with a listing of 192 of them from around the world. In between, his signature style on double-paged spreads asks how peace smells, looks, sounds, tastes, and feels. The vibrant gouache paintings work well with the text, created by Radunsky and a group of eight- to ten-year-old children from The Ambrit International School in Rome. Peace looks "like a cat and a dog curled up together in a basket," it sounds "like everyone's heart beating, making one big sound together" and it tastes "like your favorite food times two." Perfect for sharing with children of all ages who will want to share their own visions of peace with each other, this is a soothing remedy to headlines of war and terrorism. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689866760
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
10/26/2004
Pages:
24
Sales rank:
245,478
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Vladimir Radunsky has illustrated many wonderful books, including The Maestro Plays by Bill Martin Jr and Woody Guthrie's Howdi Do. He is also the author-illustrator of 10 (ten) and (with Chris Raschka) of Table Manners.
The children whose quotes appear in this book all attend The Ambrit International School in Rome. This is their first book.

Vladimir Radunsky has illustrated many wonderful books, including The Maestro Plays by Bill Martin Jr and Woody Guthrie's Howdi Do. He is also the author-illustrator of 10 (ten) and (with Chris Raschka) of Table Manners.
The children whose quotes appear in this book all attend The Ambrit International School in Rome. This is their first book.

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