What Freud Didn't Know: A Three-Step Practice for Emotional Well-Being through Neuroscience and Psychology

What Freud Didn't Know: A Three-Step Practice for Emotional Well-Being through Neuroscience and Psychology

by Timothy B. Stokes
     
 

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In a thoughtful and down-to-earth way, Timothy B. Stokes overturns old formulas—and many Freudian concepts—for achieving personal change. During one's lifetime, hidden memories, along with their misleading assumptions, can unconsciously trigger conflicted feelingsùthe basis for most psychological problems, large and small.

What Freud Didn't

Overview


In a thoughtful and down-to-earth way, Timothy B. Stokes overturns old formulas—and many Freudian concepts—for achieving personal change. During one's lifetime, hidden memories, along with their misleading assumptions, can unconsciously trigger conflicted feelingsùthe basis for most psychological problems, large and small.

What Freud Didn't Know, well-supported by research and groundbreaking in theory, combines neuroscience and psychology to explain how the amygdala region of the brain evolved to unconsciously record, store, and activate emotional memory loops and imagery associated with painful events, especially those of childhood. This book is the first to bring together diverse, post-Freudian discoveries to produce a coherent three-step practice for understanding problematic aspects of the human mind which can be mastered easily, in a clinical or self-help setting. Stokes explores recent breakthroughs, many in marked contrast to Freud's views, which will change how we view psychological and emotional problems and their treatments.

Grounded in current theories about brain circuitry, What Freud Didn't Know integrates ideas about mindfulness, habitual thinking, and insight imagery and provides readers with the tools to rescript their personal narratives for psychological well-being. As an alternative approach to treating stress, most types of depression, anxiety, and phobias without prescription drugs, Stokes's three-step practice can be used to build resiliency and inner peace.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Though Freudian therapy has, in general, been superseded by modern psychotherapy methods, practicing clinical psychologist Stokes (former editor-in chief of the Naropa Journal of Contemplative Psychotherapy) shows how Freud, over a century ago, ingeniously anticipated modern neurobiological discoveries. Freud's attribution of psychological problems to the "internal struggles" among the id, ego, and super-ego is roughly analogous to modern understanding of "the functions of three regions of the brain: the neocortical regions, the prefrontal cortex regions, and the limbic system." Recent findings by neurobiologists show that the limbic system (where the amygdala is located) "exerts a powerful role in the emotional life of humans" by regulating automatic responses to perceived danger; the release of hormones provokes a physical response perceived as emotion. Building on the concepts of cognitive therapy, which teaches clients to identify and replace dysfunctional thoughts, Stokes developed a three-step method to help people becomes aware of what he calls the amygdala "scripts" that normally operate unconsciously: step one is recognition of a conditioned response, step two identifies the trigger, and step three involves conscious reconditioning through insight. With three appendices, this makes a useful self-help manual for clients and clinicians.
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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813546407
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Publication date:
11/05/2009
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Timothy B. Stokes, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Boulder, Colorado. Since 1985 he has been clinical director of CPS Inc., which provides psychotherapy to more than 250 clients each year. He was a former editor-in-chief of the Naropa Journal of Contemplative Psychotherapy.

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