What Functional Managers Need to Know About Project Management

Overview

Discover how functional managers can apply the Kerzner Approach to project management

As a functional manager today, you need to become more involved in project management. That doesn't mean you need to become a project manager, but rather you need to know how to perform specific project-related tasks, work with project team members, understand each other's priorities and problems, and resolve issues jointly. Now here's the book that gives you ...

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Overview

Discover how functional managers can apply the Kerzner Approach to project management

As a functional manager today, you need to become more involved in project management. That doesn't mean you need to become a project manager, but rather you need to know how to perform specific project-related tasks, work with project team members, understand each other's priorities and problems, and resolve issues jointly. Now here's the book that gives you everything you need to know about your role in project management clearly and succinctly.

Based on principles set forth in the bestselling Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling, Tenth Edition, this easy-to-follow guide focuses on the pivotal role you play as an executive in project management. It introduces the acclaimed Kerzner Approach, demonstrating how it empowers functional managers with the skills needed to ensure that projects are completed successfully, on time, and on budget.

The International Institute for Learning/Wiley Series in Project Management features the most innovative, tested-and-proven approaches to project management, all explained in clear, straightforward language. The series offers new perspectives on solving tough project management problems as well as practical tools for getting the job done. Each book in the series is drawn from the related IIL course and is written by noted project management experts.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Harold D. Kerzner, Ph.D., is Senior Executive Director at the International Institute for Learning, Inc., a global learning solutions company that conducts training for leading corporations throughout the world. He is a globally recognized expert on project, program, and portfolio management, total quality management, and strategic planning. Dr. Kerzner is the author of bestselling books and texts, including the acclaimed Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling, Tenth Edition.

FRANK P. SALADIS, PMP, is a Senior Consultant and Trainer for the International Institute for Learning, Inc. and editor of the allPM.com newsletter, a global project management publication. Mr. Saladis was awarded the 2006 Linn Stuckenbruck Person of the Year Award by the Project Management Institute. The award recognizes people who have made significant contributions to the Institute as leaders in project management. Mr. Saladis is the originator of International Project Management Day, held each year to celebrate and recognize project managers from around the world.

International Institute For Learning, Inc. (IIL), is a global leader in professional training and comprehensive consulting services in the areas of project, program, and portfolio management, PRINCE2, business analysis, Microsoft Office Project and Project Server, and Lean Six Sigma. IIL is an IIBA-endorsed education provider, a PMI charter global registered education provider, and member of PMI's Silver Alliance Circle and Corporate Council.

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Table of Contents

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

International Institute for Learning, Inc. (IIL).

Chapter 1: PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES.

Project Management Humor.

Project Management.

Project Necessities.

Results of Good Planning.

Project Characteristics.

The Triple Constraint.

Resources.

Types of Project Resources.

Project Organization.

Multiple Boss Reporting.

Project-Driven versus Non-Project-Driven Firms.

Complexities in Non-Project-Driven Firms.

Level of Reporting.

Low-Level Reporting.

Why Use Project Management?

When to Use Project Management.

Relationship.

The Need for Restructuring.

Improvement Opportunities.

Resistance to Change.

Chapter 2: THE BENEFITS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT.

Benefits of Project Management.

Chapter 3: SOME IMPLEMENTATION COMPLEXITIES.

The Challenges Facing Project Managers.

Working with the Technical Prima Donna.

Early Reasons for Failure.

Chapter 4: ROLE OF THE MAJOR PLAYERS IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT: THE PROJECT MANAGER.

The Three-Legged Stool.

The Project Manager’s Role.

Negotiating for Resources.

The Project Kickoff Meeting.

Organizing the Project Team.

Responsibility Assignment Matrix.

Establishing the Project’s Policies and Procedures.

Laying Out the Project Workflow and Plan.

Establishing Performance Targets.

Obtaining Funding.

Executing the Plan.

Acting as the Conductor.

Putting Out Fires.

Counseling and Facilitation.

Encouraging the Team to Focus on Deadlines.

Monitoring Progress by "Pounding the Pavement".

Evaluating Performance.

Developing Contingency Plans.

Briefing the Project Sponsor.

Reviewing Status with the Team.

Briefing the Customer.

Closing Out the Project.

Project Management Skills.

Chapter 5: ROLE OF THE MAJOR PLAYERS IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT: THE PROJECT SPONSOR.

The Need for a Sponsor.

The Project Sponsor Interface.

Chapter 6: ROLE OF THE MAJOR PLAYERS IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT: THE FUNCTIONAL MANAGER.

Classical Management.

The Functional Manager’s Role.

Staffing Questions.

Worker Understanding and Skills.

Special Requirements.

Recruitment Policy.

Degrees of Permissiveness.

The Project Manager’s Recruitment Concerns.

Management Plan Data.

Staffing Patter versus Time.

Special Issues with Assignments.

Conflicting Policies and Procedures.

Asking for a Reference.

A Summary of Other Special Issues.

The Functional Manager’s Problems.

The Functional Manager as a Forecaster.

The Type of Matrix Structure.

The Functional Manager’s View.

Working with the Project Managers.

Expectations of the Assigned Resources.

Handling Organization Priorities.

Handling Project-Related Priorities.

Balancing Workloads.

Multiproject Planning.

Changing Resources during the Project.

The Impact of Scope Changes.

Risk Management.

Project Documentation.

Conflicts.

Conflict Resolution.

Talking to the Project Managers.

Project Performance Reports.

Estimating and Scheduling.

An Effective Working Relationship.

Successful Culture.

Promises Made.

Non-Financial Awards/Recognition.

Wall-Mounted Plaques for All to See (Cafeteria Wall).

Public Recognition.

Other Non-Monetary Rewards.

Public Pat on the Back.

Securing Proprietary Knowledge.

Wearing Multiple Hats.

Conclusion.

INDEX.

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