What Functional Managers Need to Know About Project Management [NOOK Book]

Overview

As project management has evolved and matured and projects have become more sophisticated, it has become extremely difficult for project managers to maintain their technical expertise. More and more, technical expertise resides in the functional areas of an organization. As a result, many executives and project sponsors believe that accountability for a project is shared among the project manager and all the participating line or functional managers.

Because they often now share...

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What Functional Managers Need to Know About Project Management

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Overview

As project management has evolved and matured and projects have become more sophisticated, it has become extremely difficult for project managers to maintain their technical expertise. More and more, technical expertise resides in the functional areas of an organization. As a result, many executives and project sponsors believe that accountability for a project is shared among the project manager and all the participating line or functional managers.

Because they often now share accountability for a project's success or failure, functional managers must develop a good understanding of project management. Project managers are expected to focus on and manage project deliverables. On the other hand, management of the assigned resources has become a line function and the domain of the functional manager.

What Functional Managers Need to Know About Project Management provides just what the title says. It offers functional managers a guide to project management, focusing on what they need to know and what they need to do. It provides step-by-step guidance to help functional managers work effectively within a project management team, advocate on behalf of a project, and ensure the project's success.

This book begins with basic principles, helping functional managers deal with such key issues as:

  • Why and when to use project management

  • Challenges of working with project managers and multiple-boss reporting structures

  • Anticipating and overcoming obstacles in implementation

  • Managing resistance to change

Next, the book explores the interconnected roles of the key players in a project management team, including the project manager, project sponsor, and functional manager. You'll learn about the specific responsibilities of the functional manager, including:

  • Defining how project tasks are executed

  • Assigning individuals to perform the work

  • Establishing the technical criteria for individual tasks

  • Providing needed resources to perform project activities

  • Meeting objectives within the constraints of a project

Furthermore, the authors demonstrate how the functional manager can best work with the other team members, understand each other's priorities and problems, and resolve issues jointly.

Throughout the book, helpful illustrations clarify complex concepts and processes.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118276655
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 11/29/2011
  • Series: IIL/Wiley Series in Project Management, #3
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,221,779
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Harold D. Kerzner, Ph.D., is Senior Executive Director at the International Institute for Learning, Inc., a global learning solutions company that conducts training for leading corporations throughout the world. He is a globally recognized expert on project, program, and portfolio management, total quality management, and strategic planning. Dr. Kerzner is the author of bestselling books and texts, including the acclaimed Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling, Tenth Edition.

FRANK P. SALADIS, PMP, is a Senior Consultant and Trainer for the International Institute for Learning, Inc. and editor of the allPM.com newsletter, a global project management publication. Mr. Saladis was awarded the 2006 Linn Stuckenbruck Person of the Year Award by the Project Management Institute. The award recognizes people who have made significant contributions to the Institute as leaders in project management. Mr. Saladis is the originator of International Project Management Day, held each year to celebrate and recognize project managers from around the world.

International Institute For Learning, Inc. (IIL), is a global leader in professional training and comprehensive consulting services in the areas of project, program, and portfolio management, PRINCE2, business analysis, Microsoft Office Project and Project Server, and Lean Six Sigma. IIL is an IIBA-endorsed education provider, a PMI charter global registered education provider, and member of PMI's Silver Alliance Circle and Corporate Council.

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Table of Contents

Preface vii

Acknowledgments xi

International Institute for Learning, Inc. (IIL) xii

Chapter 1: PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES 1

Project Management Humor 2

Project Management 4

Project Necessities 6

Results of Good Planning 8

Project Characteristics 10

The Triple Constraint 12

Resources 14

Types of Project Resources 16

Project Organization 18

Multiple Boss Reporting 20

Project-Driven versus Non-Project-Driven Firms 22

Complexities in Non-Project-Driven Firms 24

Levels of Reporting 26

Low-Level Reporting 28

Why Use Project Management? 30

When to Use Project Management 32

Relationship 34

The Need for Restructuring 36

Improvement Opportunities 38

Resistance to Change 40

Chapter 2: THE BENEFITS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT 43

Benefits of Project Management 44

Chapter 3: SOME IMPLEMENTATION COMPLEXITIES 69

The Challenges Facing Project Managers 70

Working with the Technical Prima Donna 72

Early Reasons for Failure 74

Chapter 4: ROLE OF THE MAJOR PLAYERS IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT: THE PROJECT MANAGER 77

The Three-Legged Stool 78

The Project Manager’s Stool 80

Negotiating for Resources 82

The Project Kickoff Meeting 84

Organizing the Project Team 86

Responsibility Assignment Matrix 88

Establishing the Project’s Policies and Procedures 90

Laying Out the Project Workflow and Plan 92

Establishing Performance Targets 94

Obtaining Funding 96

Executing the Plan 98

Acting as the Conductor 100

Putting Out Fires 102

Counseling and Facilitation 104

Encouraging the Team to Focus on Deadlines 106

Monitoring Progress by “Pounding the Pavement” 108

Evaluating Performance 110

Developing Contingency Plans 112

Briefing the Project Sponsor 114

Reviewing Status with the Team 116

Briefing the Customer 118

Closing Out the Project 120

Project Management Skills 122

Chapter 5: ROLE OF THE MAJOR PLAYERS IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT: THE PROJECT SPONSOR 127

The Need for a Sponsor 128

The Project Sponsor Interface 130

Chapter 6: ROLE OF THE MAJOR PLAYERS IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT: THE FUNCTIONAL MANAGER 133

Classical Management 134

The Functional Manager’s Role 136

Staffing Questions 138

Worker Understanding and Skills 140

Special Requirements 142

Recruitment Policy 144

Degree of Permissiveness 146

The Project Manager’s Recruitment Concerns 148

Management Plan Data 150

Staffing Pattern versus Time 152

Special Issues with Assignments 154

Conflicting Policies and Procedures 156

Asking for a Reference 158

A Summary of Other Special Issues 160

The Functional Manager’s Problems 162

The Functional Manager as a Forecaster 182

The Type of Matrix Structure 184

The Functional Manager’s View 186

Working with the Project Managers 188

Expectations of the Assigned Resources 190

Handling Organization Priorities 192

Handling Project-Related Priorities 194

Balancing Workloads 196

Multiproject Planning 198

Changing Resources during the Project 200

The Impact of Scope Changes 202

Risk Management 204

Project Documentation 206

Conflicts 208

Conflict Resolution 210

Talking to Project Managers 212

Project Performance Reports 214

Estimating and Scheduling 216

An Effective Working Relationship 218

Successful Culture 220

Promises Made 222

Non-Financial Awards/Recognition 224

Wall-Mounted Plaques for All to See (Cafeteria Wall) 226

Public Recognition 228

Other Non-Monetary Awards 230

Public Pat on the Back 232

Securing Proprietary Knowledge 234

Wearing Multiple Hats 236

Conclusion 238

Index 241

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