What I Do with Vegetable Glue

What I Do with Vegetable Glue

by Susan Chandler, Elena Odriozola
     
 

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“When my right arm fell off, I knew what to do. I stuck it back on, with vegetable glue.” This is a quirky story about a little girl who refuses to eat her vegetables. Suddenly things start falling off her body! Her right arm, her nose, and even her head roll away and she must use vegetable glue to stick them back on. Whenever she coughs, something is

Overview

“When my right arm fell off, I knew what to do. I stuck it back on, with vegetable glue.” This is a quirky story about a little girl who refuses to eat her vegetables. Suddenly things start falling off her body! Her right arm, her nose, and even her head roll away and she must use vegetable glue to stick them back on. Whenever she coughs, something is bound to go flying from her face—poor kid. Granny comes to save the day, though, with a bag of wonderful produce, and the little girl digs in as she realizes that eating cake for every meal might not be the healthiest of choices. What I Do with Vegetable Glue offers a silly story with a very important lesson for young children to inspire good eating habits—and a belly laugh or two.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Peg Glisson
A little girl's body parts keep falling off—"While others are playing, I can't even cough. If I sneeze or I burp, then something falls off." Oh, my! What's wrong? This little girl does not eat her vegetables, preferring cake instead. Consequently she lacks vegetable glue, "Which keeps all your parts/Still sticking to you." Fortunately, her amazingly fit and active 104-year-old Granny has vegetable glue by the buckets, and is willing to share, since she has always eaten all the veggies served her. The lesson is clearly stated at the end: "She ate all her greens/And I hope you do too, Then...you'll never need any vegetable glue." This very quirky tale is an unusual way to teach the young about eating their vegetables. Some children may find it a fun story, but others could well be frightened by the idea of losing body parts. The rhymes read well aloud, but the whole idea of vegetable glue is misleading and will need explaining. Ordiozola's illustrations, in muted watercolors, playfully illustrate what is happening; but again some children will find images of a rolling head, falling arm, dropped noses, and even a bum on the ground disturbing. Bottom line: know your audience—especially if you are considering reading this to a younger story time audience. It might work better with slightly older children who can appreciate the humor as part of a nutrition unit, or one-to-one at home. The rhyming text is easy to read and could be read by beginning readers. Reviewer: Peg Glisson

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781616086619
Publisher:
Sky Pony Press
Publication date:
05/15/2012
Pages:
24
Sales rank:
1,254,623
Product dimensions:
9.80(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

SUSAN CHANDLER attended the Central
School of Speech and Drama. She has written many children’s books and the limits of her imagination are not known. She works at the
Royal Opera House in Covent Garden and from the outside is a completely normal person, but we know that inside she thinks in rhyme and is always thinking about the next story. She lives in
London, England.

ELENA ODRIOZOLA has illustrated numerous books. Her wonderful sense of color and her innovative style have won her numerous awards and her artwork is loved around the world. She lives and works in San Sebastian, in the Basque region of Spain.

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