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What I Learned at University
     

What I Learned at University

5.0 1
by Michael Wells Glueck
 
Recently, I came across a carefully preserved and strongboxed collection of my course papers from college and graduate school. As a former Woodrow Wilson Fellow and university instructor of English and Classics, I found them relevant, well written with vigor mentis, and worthy of being shared. They were written during the heyday of New Criticism, when I studied under

Overview

Recently, I came across a carefully preserved and strongboxed collection of my course papers from college and graduate school. As a former Woodrow Wilson Fellow and university instructor of English and Classics, I found them relevant, well written with vigor mentis, and worthy of being shared. They were written during the heyday of New Criticism, when I studied under John Crowe Ransom and listened raptly to the visiting Robert Frost recite some of his poems. Indeed, they helped me win a first-year fellowship and a second-year subvention from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. Two pervasive themes emerge: free will, and the identification of religious faith and inspiration with literary creativity and criticism. To paraphrase T.S. Eliot, the teachings of the masters of the subtle schools are not only controversial and polymath but also anagogic and polysemous.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781430319382
Publisher:
Lulu.com
Publication date:
02/28/2007
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.88(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Bawdy Bard: Doubles Entendres in Shakespeare's Plays
The existence of sexual innuendos in Shakespeare's plays has long been noted and belongs to a widespread tradition of Elizabethan and Renaissance literature. We all understand the implication of "All I seek, is upon my love to die"; we know that Hamlet's injunction to Ophelia to "get thee to a nunnery" refers not to a convent but to a brothel. And every school boy remembers these famous lines from Act 2, Scene 4 of Romeo and Juliet:
ROMEO Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?
MERCUTIO The ship, sir, the slip; can you not conceive?
ROMEO Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great; and in such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.
MERCUTIO That's as much as to say, such a case as yours constrains a man to bow in the hams.
ROMEO Meaning, to court'sy.
MERCUTIO Thou hast most kindly hit it.
ROMEO A most courteous exposition.
MERCUTIO Nay, I am the very pink of courtesy.
ROMEO Pink for flower.
MERCUTIO Right.
ROMEO Why, then is my pump well flowered.
MERCUTIO Well said: follow me this jest now till thou hast worn out thy pump, that when the single sole of it is worn, the jest may remain after the wearing sole singular.
ROMEO O single-soled jest, solely singular for the singleness.
MERCUTIO Come between us, good Benvolio; my wits faint.
ROMEO Switch and spurs, switch and spurs; or I'll cry a match.
MERCUTIO Nay, if thy wits run the wild-goose chase, I have done, for thou hast more of the wild-goose in one of thy wits than, I am sure, I have in my whole five: was I with you there for the goose?
ROMEO Thou wast never with me for any thing when thouwast not there for the goose.
MERCUTIO I will bite thee by the ear for that jest.
ROMEO Nay, good goose, bite not.
MERCUTIO Thy wit is a very bitter sweeting; it is a most sharp sauce.
ROMEO And is it not well served in to a sweet goose?
MERCUTIO O here's a wit of cheveril, that stretches from an inch narrow to an ell broad!
ROMEO I stretch it out for that word broad; which added to the goose, proves thee far and wide a broad goose.
MERCUTIO Why, is not this better now than groaning for love? now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo; now art thou what thou art, by art as well as by nature: for this drivelling love is like a great natural, that runs lolling up and down to hide his bauble in a hole.
BENVOLIO Stop there, stop there.
MERCUTIO Thou desirest me to stop in my tale against the hair.
BENVOLIO Thou wouldst else have made thy tale large.
[Enter Nurse and PETER]
MERCUTIO O, thou art deceived; I would have made it short: for I was come to the whole depth of my tale; and meant, indeed, to occupy the argument no longer.
ROMEO Here's goodly gear!
MERCUTIO A sail, a sail!
BENVOLIO Two, two; a shirt and a smock.
Nurse Peter!
PETER Anon!
Nurse My fan, Peter.
MERCUTIO Good Peter, to hide her face; for her fan's the fairer face.
Nurse God ye good morrow, gentlemen.
MERCUTIO God ye good den, fair gentlewoman.
Nurse Is it good den?
MERCUTIO 'Tis no less, I tell you, for the bawdy hand of the dial is now upon the prick of noon.
Nurse Out upon you! what a man are you!
ROMEO One, gentlewoman, that God hath made for himself to mar.
Nurse By my troth, it is well said; for himself to mar, quoth a'?
And here are two famous sequences from Hamlet:
HAMLET
Lady, shall I lie in your lap?
Lying down at OPHELIA's feet
OPHELIA
No, my lord.
HAMLET
I mean, my head upon your lap?
OPHELIA
Ay, my lord.
HAMLET
Do you think I meant country matters?
OPHELIA
I think nothing, my lord.
HAMLET
That's a fair thought to lie between maids' legs.
OPHELIA
What is, my lord?
HAMLET
Nothing.
OPHELIA
You are keen, my lord, you are keen.
HAMLET
Ay, 'twould cost thee a-groaning to take off my edge.
The innuendos are clear. But what is often missed is the significance of the phrase, "country manners." Rather than explain it, I prefer to suggest a method of reading the phrase: Place heavy stress on the first syllable, pause for a full second, then enunciate the following three syllables.
Capisce? Perfetto! In Edmund Spenser's words, "Such peerless pleasures have we in these places."

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What I Learned at University 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
These papers, written throughout the author's university career, trace his development from a precocious bibliophile who learned to read at an early age to a serious scholar who studied at Kenyon, Columbia, Harvard, the University of Washington, and the University of Edinburgh, who won a Woodrow Wilson first-year fellowship and second-year subvention, and who taught English and Classical literatures at various U.S. universities including Columbia and three branches of the City University of New York before embarking upon a long career as a professional investment analyst. His lifelong love of literature is evident throughout these pages, and is summarized in the work's concluding quotation from the English poet Edmund Spenser: 'Such peerless pleasures have we in these places.'