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What I Thought Was True [NOOK Book]

Overview

The eagerly anticipated follow-up to My Life Next Door is a magnetic, push-me-pull-me summer romance for fans of Sarah Dessen and Jenny Han.

Gwen Castle's Biggest Mistake Ever, Cassidy Somers, is slumming it as a yard boy on her idyllic Nantucket-esque island this summer. He's a rich kid from across the bridge in Stony Bay, and she hails from a family of fishermen and housecleaners who keep the island's summer people happy. Gwen worries a life...
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What I Thought Was True

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Overview

The eagerly anticipated follow-up to My Life Next Door is a magnetic, push-me-pull-me summer romance for fans of Sarah Dessen and Jenny Han.

Gwen Castle's Biggest Mistake Ever, Cassidy Somers, is slumming it as a yard boy on her idyllic Nantucket-esque island this summer. He's a rich kid from across the bridge in Stony Bay, and she hails from a family of fishermen and housecleaners who keep the island's summer people happy. Gwen worries a life of cleaning houses will be her fate too, but just when it looks like she'll never escape her past--or the island--Gwen's dad gives her some shocking advice. Sparks fly and secret histories unspool as Gwen spends a gorgeous, restless summer struggling to resolve what she thought was true--about the place she lives, the people she loves, and even herself--with what really is.

Huntley Fitzpatrick delivers another enticing summer read full of expectation and regret, humor and hard questions, and a romance that will make every reader swoon.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Gwen Castle's summer job in the New England beach community was supposed to be low-key. The last thing she wanted was to encounter her secret love Cassidy Somers. Her infatuation isn't her only secret; this blue collar girl is certain that her reputation will make her a permanent Miss Lonely Hearts. Over the course of hot summer months, this inveterate self-doubter learns others have secrets too and, more importantly, she discovers some things about herself. Another summer romance from the author of My Life Next Door.

School Library Journal
03/01/2014
Gr 10 Up—Seventeen-year-old Gwen Castle has lived in Seashell, Connecticut her whole life, waiting hand and foot on the rich clientele who come to the island every year for a picturesque summer. And she's tired of it. The summer means getting to spend time on the beach, but it also means working long shifts at her dad's restaurant, being the third wheel to her best friend Vivien and her cousin Nico who are madly in love, and taking care of her younger brother with special needs. Suddenly, Gwen is given the opportunity to work as a caregiver for a rich elderly woman, and everything starts to change. She's forced to spend more time with the well-off and charming Cass, with whom she had a one-night stand last year. Gwen knows she should hate him after everything that happened, but the more she gets to know him, the more sparks fly. The teen begins to question what she thought was true-about Cass, about her family and friends, and about herself. This novel tells a beautiful story of first love and although some of the background information is slow to be revealed, Gwen's character has the kind of depth and voice that will enchant teens. Those with regrets of their own will find hope in this coming-of-age romance that will appeal to fans of Deb Caletti and Sara Zarr.—Candyce Pruitt-Goddard, Hartford Public Library, CT
Publishers Weekly
★ 01/20/2014
Fitzpatrick’s thoughtful and genuine love story shows the clash between classes in a New England beach community that’s home to two types of people: those who live in mansions, and those who serve them. After junior year, Gwen, whose mother is a house cleaner, has done more “serving” than she’d like to admit, earning her a less-than-pristine reputation among the members of the boys’ swim team, including rich Cass, whom Gwen secretly admires. After a humiliating run-in with him at a party, it’s hard for Gwen to believe that he wants more from her than a quick fling, but over the course of the summer, he gradually wins her trust and her heart as their paths cross on the island. Meanwhile others—Gwen’s hardworking father, her ambitious cousin and his girlfriend, and her summer employer—shock and disappoint Gwen, further upending her life. Tracing Cass’s coming of age as she faces some harsh realities, Fitzpatrick (My Life Next Door) once again evokes the dizzying heights of adolescent passion while remaining down-to-earth. Ages 14–up. Agent: Christina Hogrebe, Jane Rotrosen Agency. (Apr.)
various
• "Fitzpatrick (My Life Next Door) once again evokes the dizzying heights of adolescent passion while remaining down-to-earth."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Girls looking for a Sarah Dessen-esque romance that is a cut above the usual . . . will be delighted with Fitzpatrick's fast-paced What I Thought Was True."—VOYA

"A steamy and very believable account of how it feels to discover how important it is to take responsibility for oneself and the decisions that shape one's life. A must for collections that can't keep Sarah Dessen, Stephanie Perkins, or YA summer romance titles on the shelves."—Booklist

"Much deeper than the pretty cover lets on."—Kirkus Reviews

"A beautiful story of first love."—School Library Journal

Voya Reviews, April 2014 (Vol. 36, No. 1) - Jim Nicosia
In this story, the protagonist is working-class Gwen Castle, whose family’s new yard boy is actually rich kid Cassidy Summers, spending the summer slumming on a seaside island that is part paradise, part fishing village, full of hard-working folks. Gwen does not know if she will ever escape the island, and she beats herself up over her perceived mistakes. She thinks Cassidy is the biggest of those mistakes, but maybe he has something to teach her, as well. Senior high school girls looking for a Sarah Dessen-esque romance that is a cut above the usual, while not straying uncomfortably from the norm, will be delighted with Fitzpatrick’s fast-paced What I Thought Was True. The title tells you exactly what you should expect from the novel. It is a girl-meets-boy, girl-is-ambivalent-toward-boy-because-she-thinks-he-is-one-thing-but-he-is-really-something-else, girl-sleeps-with-boy-and-feels-guilty, girl-discovers-what-boy-really-is, girl-comes-to-grips-with-the-fact-that-so-many-of-her-preconceptions-may-be wrong summer romance. Fitzpatrick does not write with rose-colored glasses or present the characters as ideals. These are flawed people who battle their own self-conceptions and strive to discover themselves anew. Gwen learns much about her town, her family, and her future all in one summer, but there is no unrealistic happily-ever-after. Instead, there is a tomorrow that these characters must confront, and while their tomorrow is brighter, their lives are not complete—just better. Reviewer: Jim Nicosia; Ages 15 to 18.
Kirkus Reviews
2014-02-12
A teenage girl struggles with class divisions, sex and the tricky art of communication. Gwen, whose family struggles to make ends meet, is an islander, while Cass Somers is a rich boy who lives across the bridge on the mainland. The two have had some romantic moments, but miscommunication, misinterpretation and fear keep them from moving forward. Complicating things is the well-known fact that Gwen has had sex with Cass' best friend. Despite Gwen's deep regrets, the damage has been done. But now it is the summer before their senior year, and among Gwen's hopes for the summer is to forget Cass. But it seems fate has thrown them together: Cass' father has ordered him to do yardwork on the island, while Gwen has been hired to care for a funny, feisty elderly woman whose lawn needs tending. On her first day of the job, Gwen discovers Cass is also there for the duration of the summer. What starts out as snappy chick-lit writing quickly becomes deeper and more complex, as Fitzpatrick beautifully portrays a teenager's wobbly foray into sex as well as her dawning awareness of the power that actions and incautiously chosen words have to hurt others. A late revelation will surprise readers as much as it does Gwen; natural dialogue and authentic characters abound. Much deeper than the pretty cover lets on. (Fiction. 14 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101593912
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 4/15/2014
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 20,408
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • File size: 932 KB

Meet the Author

Huntley Fitzpatrick
From the author of My Life Next Door comes a new swoony summertime romance
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 21 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(11)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    Loving the subtle My Life Next Door references... Hodges, Breakf

    Loving the subtle My Life Next Door references... Hodges, Breakfast Ahoy, Tucker House, Thorpe ;)

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 15, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I couldn't wait to get my hands on this book! My Life Next Door

    I couldn't wait to get my hands on this book! My Life Next Door is one of my absolute favorite books and while What I Thought Was True does share some of the same characteristics as MLND; well-written, beautiful setting, multi-layered characters, witty banter and complex issues, it is very different.

    I'll be honest, I started and stopped this book several times over the past few weeks. For whatever reason, I just couldn't get into it the way I wanted to, had hoped and expected to. It wasn't until I was sitting on my bathroom floor at 1:00a.m. (so as not to wake the husband up), having just finished the entire 408 pages straight through that I realized WHY I struggled to get into it...

    I didn't like Gwen. I'm not even sure I can pinpoint exactly what it was that made me not like her. She's strong willed, snarky, hard working and fiercely protective of her family, all qualities I generally like in MCs, but... I don't think we would be friends in real life. (Which is totally okay.)

    Cass was a really good guy! Funny, cute, and loyal, almost to a fault, but it was his patience with Gwen that won me over. Gwen assumes the worst of him (repeatedly) despite knowing EXACTLY how that feels, but Cass doesn't give up. Instead, he chooses to see the best in her and tries to get Gwen to do the same.

    There are a lot of adults present in this story which was refreshing, even if some of them shocked and infuriated me at times. (I'm looking at you Gwen's parents.) But the most intriguing thing about What I Thought Was True (for me) was the honest look it took at the emotional side of sex.

    Having "just sex" versus being in love, using sex as a weapon, and the physical consequences were discussed, but these characters found themselves in situations because of choices they made, and it was SO NICE to see them take responsibility for that. Forgiveness was another key element as well as hope. And that Epilogue was perfect!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 14, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    What I Thought Was True is an utterly charming young adult roman

    What I Thought Was True is an utterly charming young adult romance about what has happened and what's to come.  It's a story about juggling the feelings of first love.  I was captivated from the first page until the last by the characters, the writing, and quiet love story.  The scenes in were so vividly described.  From the crackling of the seashells to the smell of salt in the air, I was transported to a place I've never been with characters I've never met and I long to go back.

    Guinevere Castle has a name of fables and fairy tales but her life is anything but one.  She lives on Seashell Island, across the bridge from Stony Bay, in a house with her mother Lucy, little brother Emory, her cousin Nic and Grandpa Ben.  Gwen and her family are islanders and part of the working class who keeps the island looking pristine for the more affluent tourists who call Seashell Island home for just part of the year.

    Part of what made this story so magnetic were the characters, both the main and secondary characters. One of the signs of a great novel is how the author crafts her characters, and this book is a prime example of characters done right.  I could tell you a little bit about each of them.This book was more than a love story, but it was the romance that sucked me in. I was completely wrapped up in all things Cass Somers. He was truly one of the sweetest heroes I have ever read. He wasn't perfect by any means, but he had had the best of intentions at all times.

    I love how Huntley Fitzpatrick peeled back the layers on the love story.  In the beginning, you learn that Gwen has a "reputation" on the island; one of the non-island boys even called her a "swim team tradition."  The source of tension comes with the introduction of Cassidy Somers, a non-islander who, instead of working at his father's thriving boat company, is this year's "yard boy" or as Mrs. Pedington likes to call him (and every other working man) "Jose." Gwen bumps into him early on and she wishes she hadn't. These two have a past that is slowing unraveled throughout the novel, informing the reader exactly what happened between the two of them that led to the present awkward situation.

    The romantic tension in this book is what propelled me to keep going.  Given what happened in the past, would Cass and Gwen finally get over that?  How do they move on?  If you require a lot of action in terms of the plot, you may not enjoy this book as much as I did.  But I don't really need dramatic plot turns and twists.  This book was more of the quiet variety, focused on the characters, their choices, and how their choices affect them.

    Lovers of young adult contemporary romance are sure to be swept away by the beauty of this book like I was.

    4.5 stars

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  • Posted September 28, 2014

    Comfortably paced and filled with summer fun, romance, and some

    Comfortably paced and filled with summer fun, romance, and some drama, What I Thought Was True is a relaxing read. With a new summer job, a crush on handsome Cassidy Summers, and a cousin with an obsession to become captain of the swim team, Gwen Castle has an eventful and illuminating summer.

    The magic of this book is all in the characters and their extremely entertaining interaction. Gwen is a thoroughly fleshed out main character with all the normal doubts, desires and dreams of any healthy, balanced teenager. Although she often feels that boys just want her as a means to an end or, perhaps, a passing interest, she is still willing to take her chances with Cass in hope of the dream relationship that her best friend, Vivien, and her cousin, Nic, has. Ultimately wanting to do the right and honest thing, she is horrified when her father gives her some extremely dubious advice.

    Cassidy Summers, the other main character, gives the impression of relaxed casualness. He seems to be the perfect romantic and hard working island yard boy, yet, one gets the impression that he might be keeping secrets from Gwen.

    From Grandpa Ben and nasty old Mrs. Partridge, to despicable Henry Ellington and Gwen's mentally handicapped little brother, Emory, the author created a rich cast of highly imaginative and realistic characters. 

    Although this book is by no means the kind of suspenseful read that will get your adrenalin going, there are a few instances where I most certainly wanted to resort to a bit of nail biting.  It is a heartwarming, romance-filled story with realistic and often touching human interaction, some betrayal and a lot of depth. This lovely clean read for young adults can definitely be enjoyed by adults as well! (Ellen Fritz)

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  • Posted September 17, 2014

    This is a story about letting go of what you thought you knew an

    This is a story about letting go of what you thought you knew and accepting what is actually true. Gwen has grown up working the summers for her father and living with her mom, cousin Nic, and brother Emery. This summer she has decided to take a job as caretaker to Mrs. Ellington opposed to working at her father’s restaurant. The only problem with working for Mrs. Ellington is that she always sees the new yard boy Cassidy.

    Gwen and Cassidy have a past together that is filled with hurt and misunderstanding. Neither of them knows how to be honest with each other and let go of what had happened in the past. Gwen holds a grudge better than Cass can, and let me tell you he is extremely patient with her when they try to work things out.

    Both Gwen and Cass have their own problems to work out. Gwen doesn’t want to be stuck cleaning houses like her mother or working at her father’s restaurant for the rest of her life. Cass is pegged as troubled because he was kicked out of his old school with his friend and his family thinks he needs to get his life together.

    There are a lot of side stories in the book as well. There is Mrs. Ellington and her son, as well as Gwen’s cousin Nic and best friend Viv dating and their problems.

    My favorite moments in the book are when Cass is teaching Gwen’s brother Emery to swim. Emery isn’t all there and the moments are really touching. Cass takes his time making Emery feel comfortable and uses things he really loves, like Matchbox cars and Superman, to get him into the water.

    In the end it comes down to telling the truth to each other and trusting in the people you are supposed to love. You’re not supposed to put up walls and barriers that make it harder for a person to be with you. Also, you need to realize that things can change and what you believe the story to be may not have been the whole story.

    Overall it was a good book and I enjoyed reading it. I’m looking forward to more books by Huntley Fitzpatrick.

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  • Posted August 8, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Excitement. Impatience. Nervousness. Reluctance. During the mont

    Excitement. Impatience. Nervousness. Reluctance. During the months I spent waiting for “What I Thought Was True,” I experienced all of those emotions (in that order). Huntley Fitzpatrick’s debut novel “My Life Next Door” is one of the most amazing books I have ever read, so naturally, my expectation for her sophomore book were sky-high. Thankfully, I wasn’t let down.

    Fitzpatrick has a knack for creating memorable, lovable characters. And her family dynamics are always spot on. In “What I Thought Was True,” Fitzpatrick swaps out the Garret family with the equally hilarious, but slightly disjointed, Castle family. Sitting on my list of favorite little siblings—right alongside George, of course—is Gwen’s sweet little bro’ Emory. Grandpa Ben and his Portuguese sayings and obsession with seafood gave life to the book as well.

    I also feel the need to mention Mrs. E and the other old ladies. There is nothing more hilarious than a bunch of erotica-reading grandmas commenting about how attractive that “young man” mowing the lawn is.

    Those ladies may be old, but they definitely know a good-looking boy when they see one. I have to agree with Betty (from Book Rock Betty) about not being able to believe that one author has the ability to create not one, but two, good boys that are so swoonworthy. For now, those tatted-up, motorcycle-riding bad boys can move aside because my heart is taken! He’s patient, sweet, vulnerable and romantic all wrapped into one tanned, toned package with a swimmer’s body. Plus, Emory, whom Cass teaches how to swim, calls him Superman. Isn’t that adorable? On a side note, I’m a total sucker for superheroes ;)

    The narrator, Gwen, is definitely a complex character. She’s afraid of getting hurt, so she won’t let Cass in. Meanwhile, she keeps hurting herself because she can’t let go of her mistakes. She has an awkward, fractured relationship with her father. She’s morally conflicted throughout the book, caught between doing what’s right and doing what others tell her to do. She’s been labeled that island slut, the “swim team tradition.” Gwen is a hot mess.

    But hot messes make the best narrators because they change so much throughout the novel. They learn, grow and heal.

    I finally get that sometimes we hold on to something – a person, a resentment, a regret, an idea of who we are – because we don’t know what to reach for next. That what we’ve done before is what we have to do again. That there are only re-dos and no do-overs. And maybe… maybe I know better than that.

    The scene setting in “What I Thought Was True” is just as amazing as it was in “My Life Next Door.” I can taste the beach food and smell the salty air. I can also feel the class conflict—another MLND quality—that comes from living in an island of locals and vacationers.

    All of that being said, I didn’t like “What I Thought Was True” as much as “My Life Next Door.” One particular weakness was the pacing. The plot dragged at the beginning, the events rapidly unraveling in the last 50 pages. The flashbacks felt awkward, usually not really revealing anything particular mind-blowing.

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  • Posted July 21, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    It¿s such a great feeling when you pick up a new book and it imm

    It’s such a great feeling when you pick up a new book and it immediately clicks, and that’s the feeling I had within the first few pages of What I Thought Was True. I knew right away that this was going to be another Huntley Fitzpatrick masterpiece. I am so in love with this woman’s writing; whether it’s the way she describes the smell of low tide on a hazy summer night or the angst of a young woman who never felt as though she was worth very much to anyone. Fitzpatrick has a talent of getting you to the heart of the matter by allowing you to become intimately familiar with the story and the characters. I absolutely adore how she takes the time to immerse you in their stories but at the same time moving the plot forward with impeccable pacing.
    I’m also a huge fan of how beautiful her descriptions of even the smallest of details can be. There were so many passages in this novel that I had to stop and re-read again because they were just so perfect.

    “I shift my gaze to the limitless blue of the sky, acutely aware of every sound–the sighing ocean, the hum of the bees in the beach plum bushes, the distant heartbeat throb of a speedboat."
    I’m a New England girl through and through, and this novel reminded me of everything I love about the summers here; salty skin, sunsets from the pier and warm nights by the sea. The beach-side community was the perfect setting for the novel and it became a character all on its own. You can tell that Fitzpatrick is New England born and bred as well, she gets all of the details perfectly right. Even down to the crushed seashell driveways and Hoodsie cups.What really touched me about this novel though was how often Gwen’s situation reminded of the feelings I had as young woman, learning to love myself despite the mistakes I made. Her family life is complicated and she has to deal with so many influences at home that force her to be wise beyond her years. Living under the same roof as your mom, a little brother with special needs, your cousin AND your grandfather is bound to create some drama. Luckily she loves and is loved by her family so completely that it makes the strain a little easier and they all know they can rely on one another. even though it was filled with its’ fair share of drama, I really enjoyed the dynamics between Gwen and her family, and how it just added to the dynamic layers of her character.One relationship that she isn’t so sure of is the one with Cassidy (Cass) Somers, the rich boy from the mainland who takes a job as a yard boy with the rest of “the help” on the island she lives on. Gwen doesn’t know why he decided to take the job and she certainly doesn’t know how to interact with him considering their history. Throughout the book, both Gwen and Cass work on finding a way to define a new friendship without letting the mistakes of their past get in the way. She definitely wants to keep the relationship strictly platonic, but Cass’ good looks and charm end up making that a pretty difficult task. Slowly but surely he finds a way to insert himself into nearly every aspect of Gwen’s life and she’s forced to find a way to accept that. At the same time, Cass is forced to deal with the repercussions of “that night” and find a way to get Gwen to trust him again. It’s such an honest portrayal of former friends navigating their way back to each other, with both of them not having any clue of how to get there or what will happen once they do.One relationship that she isn’t so sure of is the one with Cassidy (Cass) Somers, the rich boy from the mainland who takes a job as a yard boy with the rest of “the help” on the island she lives on. Gwen doesn’t know why he decided to take the job and she certainly doesn’t know how to interact with him considering their history. Throughout the book, both Gwen and Cass work on finding a way to define a new friendship without letting the mistakes of their past get in the way. She definitely wants to keep the relationship strictly platonic, but Cass’ good looks and charm end up making that a pretty difficult task. Slowly but surely he finds a way to insert himself into nearly every aspect of Gwen’s life and she’s forced to find a way to accept that. At the same time, Cass is forced to deal with the repercussions of “that night” and find a way to get Gwen to trust him again. It’s such an honest portrayal of former friends navigating their way back to each other, with both of them not having any clue of how to get there or what will happen once they do.Speaking of Cass, he earns his spot in my book boyfriend hall of farm for his sincerity, kindness and persistence. He’s so honest with Gwen and you can tell that despite everything he truly cares for Gwen and only wants the best for her. His messy blonde hair, tan skin, strong arms and habit of being shirtless also paint a pretty swoon-worthy picture. I think it’s pretty safe to say that I am obsessed!One of the things I really appreciated about this book was how honestly the topic of sex was handled. It’s not always sunshine and roses, mistakes are made and you start wishing things had been done differently. I’ll get real for a sec and admit that I’ve been there and to see myself in Gwen’s situation was so refreshing. It was great to read a YA book in which the main character faces the dilemma head on and fights her way through to the other side. More so for herself than anything else and no matter how scary it may be. The trick is not to let those mistakes own you and find a way to move beyond the past with out it dragging you down. I adored Gwen for her humility and ultimately her strength, and found myself wishing that this book had been around when I was younger.Huntley Fitzpatrick masterfully weaves three love stories into one with this novel; the complicated love between a boy and girl, the story of a girl learning to love herself and Huntley’s love letter to summer in New England. The common thread throughout this book was the journey we all take in life to discover what it is we truly love. What you thought you wanted isn’t always what you get..it may turn out to be something even better.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2014

    New Favorite Author

    She is fighting for space on my shelf...and winning. If you are a Dessen fan, you will enjoy this book. It was funny, honest, angsted ridden and wonderful!

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  • Posted June 6, 2014

    I absolutely loved My Life Next Door, so I was fairly certain I¿

    I absolutely loved My Life Next Door, so I was fairly certain I’d adore this book as well. I really enjoyed What I Thought Was True, and I flew through the 400 pages in a short amount of time. This doesn’t feel like a long story, and thankfully there are no lulls. While reading, I kept thinking, “How will I rate this book? 3 stars or 4? What am I going to say about it?” It was a GOOD book, but there’s nothing inherently unique about the story itself. The gold, however, is in the writing. Fitzpatrick’s style made this typical tale of poor girl/rich boy feel completely new and fresh. I’m a sucker for summer romances, Nantucket vacations, and YA fiction, so this book hit on 3 of my loves. The characters are accessible and all too human. The only one I had a hard time getting a grasp on was Gwen’s dad, and I’m still not sure how to picture him. I’ve been itching for this release since I read Fitzpatrick’s other novel a few months ago, and I was definitely not disappointed. My only criticism of her first novel was the amount of rough language used—mainly the f word. I was so happy to see this book was much cleaner! I still think My Life Next Door is my favorite of her titles so far, but I can’t wait to see what she gives us next! After losing myself in both of her novels, Huntley Fitzpatrick is officially on my list of favorite authors. Make sure to read one (or both!) of her books this summer!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2014

    "What I Thought Was True"  When I picked up this book

    "What I Thought Was True" 

    When I picked up this book there was no way I could have predicted the impact it would have on me. It took me about three days to
     read this book, beginning to end, and that was only because I did not want it to have to say goodbye to the characters
    Huntley Fitzpatrick created. I would pick it up and read a page then solemnly place it back down, forcing myself not to devour it
    all in one sitting. 

    "What I Thought Was True" is told through the eyes of Gwen Castle. Summer is just starting and Gwen is anything but thrilled.
    With the changing season comes tourists and 'summer people'. Gwen, her family and friends live on SeaShell Island year
     round but when the temperatures rise they are all but background noise to the 'upper class' vacationing there. 

    Gwen can handle this, jokingly calling herself and the other 'help' the Maria's and Jose's of the island, she can handle her best
    friend Viv and her cousin Nico secretly looking at engagement rings and failing to clue her in, she can even handle her new employers
    son, Henry Ellington, not so subtly telling her that everything in his Mothers house is itemized and even the tiniest thing would be
    missed.

    What she can't handle is having her past violently colliding into her present. 

    Cue Cassidy Somers. 

    Cassidy is the Islands new yard boy for the summer. 
    Try as she might Gwen can't seem to avoid Cas nor can she avoid their past together or her reputation on the island because of it. 

    Whether Gwen is helping her Viv cater for 'Almedia's', worrying about her little brother Emory or reading a steamy romance novel to
    Mrs. Ellington, Cas always seems to be there. And try as she might to push him from her thoughts Gwen can't seem to ignore his
    ever persistent presence. 

    While tutoring Cas or watching him teach Emory to swim she can't stop herself from letting her mind drift down memory lane. 

    Told over the course of a summer "What I Thought Was True" teaches us all that second chances and true loves are few
    and far between. 

    Huntley Fitzpatrick has gained a faithful reader in me and I'm positive I am not the only one who feels this way.

    Fans of Sarah Dessen will love this intoxicating summer read.
    Until next time, 
    GingerReader22

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2014

    5

    This book is subtle but artistic and imaginitive.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2014

    I waited a bit to review.  I really enjoy the author's style.  I

    I waited a bit to review.  I really enjoy the author's style.  I think if I'd reviewed it immediately after, I would have given the book 4 starts, but the characters have really stuck with me, I find myself searching for something similar.  So that pushed the review to a 4.5 for sure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2014

    The Plot was kind of slow and confusing at times, but overall it

    The Plot was kind of slow and confusing at times, but overall it was a pretty good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2014

    Good read.....but okay

    I enjoyed this book very much and the author. One thimg i didnt care for was the way it was written. I was confused at wnat was going on at certain times. Overall it was a wonderful read!!!

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  • Posted April 23, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    4.5 stars!   I've heard that authors whose debut books are succ

    4.5 stars!  

    I've heard that authors whose debut books are successful sometimes find it hard to write their second book. Not so in Huntley Fitzpatrick's case. She's written another book that manages to grab your attention and not let it go until the end. I found myself thinking of this book weeks after I'd read it. I wasn't ready to let Gwen, Cass, and the other characters go.




    To tell the truth, the blurb only hints at the complexity of the book. This book is about so much more than Gwen and Cass. It's about Gwen's family and friends too. Let's talk about the sneak peek first. It was only the first three chapters and I was left wondering why the publisher Dial was being cruel to all the bloggers and readers who didn't get access to the whole book. I mean it's a great introduction to Gwen's family but only hints at why Gwen wants to get off the island so badly and what Cass is to her. Just to reassure you, I did end up liking Cass, it just took me a while to reconcile and process all the information I had. 




    So, I read the sneak peek and immediately went and bought the hardback. I knew waiting was going to be tough, but I wanted to have the book to hold and I devoured the rest when it arrived. The wait was well worth it. I really liked Gwen. She's a teenager whose in a situation not entirely of her making and seeing parts of it that are her fault hurt her. She's been labeled something she's not and even though she knows it's not true, hearing the words again and again are still painful. I wanted to both hug Gwen and shake her at the same time. In the beginning I didn't understand what Cass had done to hurt Gwen but when I did, I was not happy. 




    One of the most interesting and complex tracks in this story and a twist I didn't see coming and then did later on involved Gwen's cousin Nico. I felt his pain like a blow to my chest. Life can really feel unfair sometimes. I feel so bad about this, but I've got to get it off my chest. [ Please don't read on if you haven't read the book. If you've read the book, I'd love to hear your thoughts on this. Nico was accused of cheating towards the end of the book which is something Cass said justified some behaviors. What I would like to know is, how did he cheat? The accusations were never addressed, only made. (End spoiler)]




    I read somewhere Huntley is writing a sequel/follow up book to her amazing debut book, My Life Next Door, and I know I can't wait to read it, but I do hope Huntley will revisit the characters from this book as well. I also know I'd read anything she wrote and know it would be a great quality read.

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  • Posted April 22, 2014

    *MY THOUGHTS*      Seeing as I'm a huge fan of contemporary

    *MY THOUGHTS*




         Seeing as I'm a huge fan of contemporary stories, knowing that I had not read a book by Huntley Fitzpatrick just wasn't working for me. So when her sophomore novel What I Thought Was True, hit stores, I KNEW I couldn't miss out on reading this one too.

         The number one thing I liked about this one was the way I related to it. In case you didn't know, I'm originally from Galveston Island, Texas. Of course this means it's a beach. I found it so interesting that all the things Gwen talked about, I knew about as well. The causeway, the way they looked at people that weren't originally from the island, just everything. All that made it the perfect summer read. Then there was the fact that her brother had an unidentified illness that seems like autistic, but isn't. My little sister is now 18 and has been battling that same thing her entire life. Although there is a ten year age difference between them, I could still see so many of those characteristics in Emory that I saw in my sister. It made me love the little boy even more!

         I also loved the realism of the story. I know I once said that Morgan Matson was the queen of realistic fiction, but after reading passages like: "We sail in silence until the sunset turns the sky streaky Italian ice colors: raspberry, lemon, tangerine- all against blue cotton candy." you can't help but think Fitzpatrick is ALSO the Queen because I mean, the imagery guys.... It was like she included every little detail just to make sure it was realistic. Like she wanted to be sure we would feel like we were actually there. And trust me, everything about her writing style made me feel as if I was sucked to Seashell Island and was watching all these events in person. Her imagery, the way her words flowed, everything was just beautiful.

         But unfortunately, there was something that I didn't care for. And of course it was something that couldn't be overlooked. It was the plot of all things. I liked that in the end things were not what I expected and I still was surprised when I saw everything play out. But I didn't like that it felt rushed. Like just to make the story end. Now I know the story is already long (this edition is 422 pages...), but what would a few more pages have done? And that epilogue just seemed like it was tacked on because she knew it was a little rushed.

         Along with that, comes the reasoning of why Gwen was acting that way. I'm all for feminism, but sometimes you go too far. Sex without any type of feelings is your choice, but be smart about it. Especially if you're doing it while drunk, with someone who gets around a lot, or if you yourself get around a lot. Make sure you always wrap it i\up. No sense in spending one night with someone and then getting rid of them, only to realize that you dot something else you have to keep. And that's what I was most upset with Gwen about. Although she was doing all that she wanted to do, her actions could've come with consequences and I just think Fitzpatrick should have explored those more.

         My first book with Fitzpatrick definitely made me wonder why I never read her first one. After reading just the first page I ordered My Life Next Door from Amazon. Although it wasn't completely perfect, I plan to read everything else by her. Her amazing imagery is too amazing to miss out on.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    To get #2

    Brown sugar. Apples. Cookies. Potatoes. Onions. Balogna. Salami. Chicken patties. Clean fridge. Smoked turkey necks. Ham hocks. Kellogs breakfast drinks.
    Little Debbie's snacks. Ground beef. Chili beans. Chili powder. Garlic powder. Corn. Baked beans. Hot sauce.

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    The problems with these kind of books is that they can never liv

    The problems with these kind of books is that they can never live up to the previous book. My Life Next Door is probably my favorite book, and anything following something like that just can't compare...
    I honestly loved What I Thought Was True though! It took a bit of a while to get into, the plot seemed kind of scattered to me,  and some parts I was pushing myself to read it just so I can finish it, but it eventually did pull me in. What I really loved was the realistic view of sex. As a teenager, I admit that sex is starting to be taken for granted at our age, and this book portrays it realistically and that's all I could want..
    Not what I expected the book to be, but still worth reading :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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