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What if the Zebras Lost Their Stripes?
     

What if the Zebras Lost Their Stripes?

by John Reitano
 
If the zebras lost their stripes and became different from one another, some white and some black, would they turn and fight each other and stop living life as loving friends?

Winner of the National Parenting Center�s Seal of Approval

Overview

If the zebras lost their stripes and became different from one another, some white and some black, would they turn and fight each other and stop living life as loving friends?

Winner of the National Parenting Center�s Seal of Approval

Editorial Reviews

Good stories often spring from a simple question that begins with "What if�." In the case of "What If The Zebras Lost Their Stripes?" - the rest of the question is indeed a good one. The question open the door to an examination of all facets of diversity - race, religion, ethnicity and gender - as well as delivering a story about love, compassion and tolerance. — by Carroll Lachnit
Beverly Medlyn
What would happen if zebras suddenly split into two types? Would they still be friends? This parable about prejudice is charmingly written and delightfully illustrated. Sure to spark discussion, this volume is a worthy addition to classroom and home libraries.
Arizona Public
Elaine Gant
This superb book is geared for children with the hope that adults will also learn from its crucial message. It is an ingenious look at prejudice, profound in its simplicity, and beautiful in that down-deep, heart-warming way inherent in all of Earth's creatures. Reitano's poetry and Haines' artistry are equally responsible for the caliber of this book and the potency of its meaning. They are to be commended - this book is flawless!
Children's Magazine
Natalie Soto
The title and a series of other related questions address racism at an appropriate level for young readers. Other animals look awestruck as they watch the zebras separate themselves by black and white. In the end, "Zebras would be much too smart/To let their colors tear them apart!" The rhythm and the bright and lively illustrations will draw most readers to the book again and again.
Denver Rocky Mountain News
National Parenting Center
Hidden within this beautiful book is an exceptional message of racial tolerance and acceptance. The author's desire to impart this important theme to the reader is clearly evident throughout the story. Together with the wonderful illustrations by William Haines, Reitano captures the essence and beauty of acceptance. This book is a great springboard for discussion in a classroom setting.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
With rhymed couplets and goofy illustrations, this parable attempts to teach that love looks beyond superficial differences. Reitano, an educator and speaker, asks, "What if the zebras/ lost their stripes,/ and some lost black/ and some lost white?" Would the zebras recognize their common identity, or would they begin to notice their new differences in color and start to fight? Would they move to separate lands, or would the young zebras be allowed to laugh and play together? Reitano raises the stakes with each new possibility of the choices the zebras might make. Though Haines's vibrant colors add warmth to the illustrations, the animals' human-like expressions are jarring. This simplistic tale about overcoming differences and achieving harmony overlooks the deeper ramifications of racism. Ages 4-up. (Sept.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780809166497
Publisher:
Paulist Press
Publication date:
05/28/1998
Pages:
30
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 9.70(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
4 - 6 Years

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