What Is Poetry?

Overview

Mr. Edmond Holmes has set himself a greatly daring task in this very suggestive little book. From Aristotle downwards men have attempted to answer the question, "What is poetry?" and have met with hut indifferent success. We will not say that Mr. Holmes succeeds where they failed; but he does describe the modus operandi of poetry in a novel and stimulant way. At first sight the motto of his book, taken from Carlyle, seems to be in direct conflict with his thesis. "Poetic creation, what is this but seeing the ...
See more details below
What is poetry?

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Digitized from 1900 volume)
FREE
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

More About This Book

Overview

Mr. Edmond Holmes has set himself a greatly daring task in this very suggestive little book. From Aristotle downwards men have attempted to answer the question, "What is poetry?" and have met with hut indifferent success. We will not say that Mr. Holmes succeeds where they failed; but he does describe the modus operandi of poetry in a novel and stimulant way. At first sight the motto of his book, taken from Carlyle, seems to be in direct conflict with his thesis. "Poetic creation, what is this but seeing the thing sufficiently? The word that will describe the thing follows of itself from such intense clear sight of it." So speaks Carlyle, as quoted by Mr. Holmes. Yet the first postulate laid down by Mr. Holmes is that "Poetry is the expression of strong and deep feeling." The two appear irreconcilable, if either be laid down singly. The truth is, that neither should be laid down singly. The basis of the poetic faculty is neither intuition alone, nor emotion alone. (For, be it observed, Mr. Holmes is really investigating rather the poetic faculty than poetry itself: he is inquiring into the operation of poetry in the mind of the poet.) The basis of the poetic gift is intellectual insight, or intuition, combined with emotional sensibility. The union is so subtle, that the poet may be said in a manner to see through his sensitive nature. "I see it feelingly," he might enounce with Lear. Mr. Holmes had done better to take as his postulate: "Poetry is the expression of truth seen feelingly." For that, indeed, is the foundation, the modus operandi, of the poetic faculty. But, in fact, this is Mr. Holmes's basis, and his failure to enunciate it distinctly exemplifies a lack of precision in thought which somewhat mars a deeply conceived and mainly right essay.

He implicates sight in feeling-the very union which we have ourselves postulated. The more pity that his position is not made water-tight by being logically announced, instead of illogically implied. He arrives at it in this way: the poet's feelings, he truly observes, are not different from those of other men; or else they could awaken no sympathy in others. But what the poet possesses in a highly developed state is latent in other men. Now where there is feeling there is something to be felt. The poet's higher range of feelings, therefore, correspond to a higher range of truth (or realities, as Mr. Holmes prefers to say, curiously discriminating reality from truth-in which we refuse to follow him) latent or invisible to others as these higher feelings are latent in others. Through these intense and subtle feelings he is led to discern these higher truths, which in turn beget emotion, and emotion leads on to further truth, in perpetual interaction. It is justly and delicately apprehended. But here we have assumed that union of intuition and feeling, of intuition in feeling, which should explicitly have been postulated.

-The Academy, Volume 58 [1900]

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781508899433
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 3/16/2015
  • Pages: 106
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.22 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)