What Is the World Made Of?: All About Solids, Liquids, and Gases

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Overview

Did you ever walk through a wall? Drink a glass of blocks? Have you ever played with a lemonade doll, or put on milk for socks? This latest addition to the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series introduces the youngest readers to an important science concept: the differences between solids, liquids, and gases. Any child who wants to know why he can't walk through a wall will enjoy Kathleen Zoehfeld's simple text and Paul Meisel's playful illustrations.

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Overview

Did you ever walk through a wall? Drink a glass of blocks? Have you ever played with a lemonade doll, or put on milk for socks? This latest addition to the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series introduces the youngest readers to an important science concept: the differences between solids, liquids, and gases. Any child who wants to know why he can't walk through a wall will enjoy Kathleen Zoehfeld's simple text and Paul Meisel's playful illustrations.

Did you ever walk through a wall? Drink a glass of blocks? Have you ever played with a lemonade doll, or put on milk for socks? This latest addition to the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series introduces the youngest readers to an important science concept: the differences between solids, liquids, and gases. Any child who wants to know why he can't walk through a wall will enjoy Kathleen Zoehfeld's simple text and Paul Meisel's playful illustrations.

Author Biography: Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld has written many books for children, including How Mountains Are Made, What Is the World Made Of?, and What Lives in a Shell? in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series. Ms. Zoehfeld lives in Norwalk, CT.

Lucia Washburn's first book for young readers was Look to the North by Jean Craighead George. She lives in Petaluma, CA.

In simple text, presents the three states of matter, solid, liquid, and gas, and describes their attributes.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Linda Uhlenkott
Solids, liquids and gases are the simple building blocks of science offered in this nonfiction trade book. With familiar scenarios and everyday items, children learn about the concepts of solids, liquids and gases. "If your sister spills milk on the table" shows how liquids spread out. A simple experiment, using a borrowed bottle of perfume and an empty room, demonstrates how gases spread through the air. When a demonstration demands more complex activities (such as using a hot stove to boil water) children are warned that they'll need an adult's help. In addition to showing children how to demonstrate several of these properties for themselves, this book also asks them to extend their thinking by imagining what the world would be like if heat and cold turned everything into solids, liquids or gases. "Can you imagine a world where your toys would melt when it gets too hot?" Familiar scenarios and items make the concepts understandable. Also, the predictable word patterns and pictures that are tied to the text aid comprehension for the youngest reader. The last page in the book offers several simple experiments that children can conduct with very little help from adults. Also included is a method of charting that introduces record keeping. This book is especially recommended for teachers who are looking for appropriate nonfiction books for primary-age children. Parents will find it interesting and useful as a supplementing to the science curriculum.
Horn Book
"Have you ever seen anyone walk through a wall? Did you ever drink a glass of blocks? Have you ever played with a lemonade doll, or put on milk for socks? Walls and blocks, dolls and socks. Milk and lemonade.... All of these things are made of matter." Zoehfeld and Meisel add competently to the venerable Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series as they comfortably explain the three states of matter to beginning readers. Solids, hard or soft, hold their shape. Shapeless liquids take on the shape of whatever they're in. Invisible gases spread out to fill any container they're in, too. Children are invited to make personal observations of water as it changes from one state to another, and the homey experi-ments are demonstrated by a cheerful cast of boys and girls, parents and animals. Meisel deftly mixes media to color his energetic line drawings, and conversation balloons add to the humor. A final page of simple ob-servation exercises rounds out the handy lesson in fundamental science that will be appreciated by teachers and enjoyed by children.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060271435
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/1/1998
  • Series: Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science Series: Stage 2
  • Edition number: 1389
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.32 (d)

Meet the Author

Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld worked as an editor of children's books for over ten years before beginning her career as a writer. She has written two other books for the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series" What Lives in a Shell?, illustrated by Helen K. Davie, and How Mountains Are Made, illustrated by James Graham Hale. Ms Zoehfeld lives in Norwalk, Connecticut.

Paul Meisel has illustrated many books for children, including Why Are the Ice Caps Melting?, Energy Makes Things Happen, and What Happens to Our Trash? in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series. He lives in Newtown, Connecticut.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2012

    Great series

    Great text and illustrations. A nice introduction to matter- a useful resource for teachers or for parents with inquisitive children who enjoy learning about the world around them.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2004

    It really matters!

    I teach kindergarten. Each year I teach a unit about matter. 'What Is the World Made Of?: All About Solids, Liquids, and Gases' is the very best resource I have ever purchased. It explains matter using simple, easy to understand language that my students understand. I recommend this book highly!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted December 6, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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