What Makes Flamingos Pink?: A Colorful Collection of Q & A's for the Unquenchably Curious

What Makes Flamingos Pink?: A Colorful Collection of Q & A's for the Unquenchably Curious

by Bill McLain
     
 

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Do spiders sleep? Why are barns red? Why is there a crescent moon on outhouse doors? Are zebras white with black stripes or black with white stripes?

As the Xerox Corporation's official webmaster, Bill McLain often fielded as many as 1,000 questions a day on just about everything under the sun — and beyond. The wildest, funniest, and even most astute are

Overview

Do spiders sleep? Why are barns red? Why is there a crescent moon on outhouse doors? Are zebras white with black stripes or black with white stripes?

As the Xerox Corporation's official webmaster, Bill McLain often fielded as many as 1,000 questions a day on just about everything under the sun — and beyond. The wildest, funniest, and even most astute are collected here (along with their answers) in McLain's second volume that's as fascinating and enlightening as his first, Do Fish Drink Water? A "veritable Internet legend known for having all the answers" (San Francisco Chronicle), McLain explains what keeps squirrels from toppling off telephone wires; why the skin on your fingers and toes shrivels up in the water; how seedless watermelons are created; and more. Whether it's animal, vegetable, mineral, or something completely different, the answer is bound to be as interesting as the question itself, and certain to satisfy the trivia hound in everyone.

Editorial Reviews

San Jose Mercury News
The legions who have dropped him a line have dubbed McLain...Prophet, Answer Dude, Webmeister, Guru of Locating Unusual Information.
San Francisco Chronicle
A veritable Internet legend known for having all the answers.
The Industry Standard
McLain has become an urban legend on-line because he'll answer any question under the sun.
Industry Standard
McLain has become an urban legend on-line because he'll answer any question under the sun.
Library Journal
The subtitle of this book nicely describes what lies inside: intriguing, puzzling, and downright trivial. Each topic is posed as a question, which is then answered. The answers, written in a narrative style, have just enough detail to make them useful but not overwhelming. Many of the answers also include a "Did you know?" section that provides related information or facts that are tangential to the actual answer but quite interesting. The work is written in a conversational, accessible style that will appeal to many readers. McLain (Do Fish Drink Water?), who as webmaster for Xerox leads a team that fields inquiries addressed to the company, has a great deal of experience answering questions. Although the questions and answers are interesting, this book has limited value as a reference work. There are not enough entries to make it comprehensive in any topic, no sources are listed, and no cross references are given. It is fun to read in short bursts. It could even pique a school-age child's interest in a subject. Consider for circulating collections, not reference. Manya Chylinski, Ernst & Young, Ctr. for Business Knowledge, Boston Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060000240
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/01/2002
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
637,466
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.75(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Animal Kingdom

Do all bears hibernate?
(Bear with me on this one.)

To be perfectly accurate, no bear hibernates. When an animal hibernates, it is near death and may appear to be dead. Its body temperature drops to near 32°F, it breathes just a few times a minute, and its heartbeat is so slow as to be almost imperceptible. If the animal is exposed to warmth, a few hours may pass before it awakens and is alert. Animals that hibernate include bats, hedgehogs, ground squirrels, and marmots.

Although most people say that bears hibernate, hibernation is not the proper term in the case of bears, because during their sleep there is little change in their body temperature, respiration, or metabolic rate. A better term would be "deep winter sleep" (the scientific term is "dormancy"). If left alone they can sleep in the same position for months, yet they awaken quite easily if disturbed.

The reason for hibernation and deep winter sleep is the same. During winter, food is scarce, and it's often difficult for some animals to maintain their normal body temperature. To protect themselves, many animals pass the time away by hibernating or sleeping. They store body fat when food is plentiful, then live off the stored fat when hibernating or sleeping. By sleeping for long periods of time, they keep activity to a minimum and also control their temperature and metabolism so that no growth occurs.

A bear may decide to sleep in a hollow tree, a cave, a pile of brush, or a den that it has dug. Sometimes the bear adds dried leaves and grass to its bed for additional insulation against the harsh cold ofwinter.

Not all bears sleep all winter. If bears live in an environment with a good year-round food supply, they don't need to go into a deep winter sleep. Tropical bears such as sun bears, sloth bears, and spectacled bears never go into a winter sleep.

The male polar bear never goes into dormancy, but the female does only if she is pregnant.

If a bear is accustomed to dormancy but is kept in a zoo where food is always available, it will not go into dormancy regardless of how cold it may get.

Factoids

The Australian koala bear is not a bear at all but a marsupial related to the kangaroo. The bearcat, a nickname for the Southeast Asian binturongs, is not a bear either. They are related to a little-known group of animals that includes civets, genets, and linsangs.

People seem to love bears in spite of their size and ferocity, especially the fictional bears Baloo, Fozzie Bear, Paddington Bear, Yogi Bear, and Winnie the Pooh. The most famous live bear was Smokey.

Polar bears have white fur but black skin. Each hair is actually a clear hollow tube designed to funnel the sun's rays to the bear's skin, thereby keeping it warm. Because the rays bounce off the fur, the polar bear appears to be white.

The sloth bear lives on a diet of termites. However, like humans, bears have a sweet tooth. They often break open beehives and will continue eating honey even though their nose has been stung many times.

When a bear is dormant, it does not eliminate its waste but recycles it by turning the toxic compounds into protein. Researchers are trying to discover how bears do this because the bears' method could lead to methods of treating kidney failure in humans.

Did you know?

Although bears are meat eaters and often ferocious, they have their gentle side too. In 1995 four unwanted kittens were dumped near a wildlife rehabilitation center in Grant's Pass, 0regon. Although employees trapped three of the kittens and took care of them, they could not catch the fourth.

By late summer the kitten was starving. Seeing a 560-pound grizzly bear devouring food in the compound, the kitten squeezed through a hole in the fence and approached the grizzly.

Everyone was terrified that the poor stray kitten was going to be the grizzly's next meal. The bear looked at the kitten, pulled a piece of chicken from its dinner, and tossed it aside for the kitten.

The bear, named Griz, never harmed the kitten. In fact they became close friends and ate, slept, and played together. The employees named the kitten "Cat."

At last report, Griz and Cat were still the best of friends. They probably still are today.

Is it true that a dinosaur larger than
Tyrannosaurus rex was recently found?
(A head-to-head match.)

In 1995 scientists in Argentina discovered a meat-eating dinosaur they named Giganotosaurus. They claimed that it was as big as or bigger than the North American Tyrannosaurus. However, their claim is still being disputed. Although Giganotosaurus had a larger skull, it had a smaller brain, making it less intelligent. It has a longer upper leg bone but a shorter lower leg bone, so both dinosaurs were about the same height.

However, the non-meat-eating dinosaurs were considerably larger. In fact, of all the known dinosaurs, which one is the biggest depends on how you measure a dinosaur's size.

A dinosaur named Argentinosaurus was recently discovered in Argentina (hence the name). It was 70 feet high, 120 feet long, and weighed around 220,000 pounds. In other words, it was as tall as a seven-story building, almost the width of a football field, and weighed around 110 tons.

In 1994 scientists in southeastern Oklahoma found the bones of another huge dinosaur. They named it Sauroposeidon, which means "earthquake god lizard." It was 60 feet high, weighed 60 tons, and was 150 feet long, partly because it had the longest neck of any known dinosaur.

One standard measurement used to define a dinosaur's size is length, which is measured from the tip of its nose to the tip of its tail. Because Sauroposeidon was 30 feet longer than Argentinosaurus...

What Makes Flamingos Pink?. Copyright © by Bill McLain. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Meet the Author

The Internet's legendary "Answer Whiz," Bill McLain was Xerox Corporation's official Webmaster. Responsible for the e-mails sent to the company Website, McLain and his team responded to an astounding 750-1,000 questions daily. While most of the e-mails he received were Xerox-related, every day scores of curious fact-seekers wrote with questions ranging from the bizarre to the useful to the downright comical. McLain collected the most memorable of these questions, along with his equally memorable answers, in What Makes Flamingoes Pink? and in its predecessor, Do Fish Drink Water? He lives in Santa Clara, California.

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