What Mean These Bones?: Studies in Southeastern Bioarchaeology

What Mean These Bones?: Studies in Southeastern Bioarchaeology

by Mary Lucas Powell
     
 

A Dan Josselyn Memorial Publication

Until recently, archaeological projects that included analysis of human remains had often lacked active collaboration between archaeologists and physical anthropologists from the planning stages onward. During the 1980s, a conjunctive approach developed; known as "bioarchaeology," it draws on the methodological

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Overview

A Dan Josselyn Memorial Publication

Until recently, archaeological projects that included analysis of human remains had often lacked active collaboration between archaeologists and physical anthropologists from the planning stages onward. During the 1980s, a conjunctive approach developed; known as "bioarchaeology," it draws on the methodological and theoretical strengths of the two subdisciplines to bridge a perceived communications gap and promote a more comprehensive understanding of prehistoric and historic cultures.
 

This volume addresses questions of human adaptation in a variety of cultural contexts, with a breadth not found in studies utilizing solely biological or artifactual data. These nine case studies from eight Southeastern states cover more than 4,000 years of human habitation, from Archaic hunter-gatherers in Louisiana and Alabama to Colonial planters and slaves in South Carolina. Several studies focus upon variations in health between or within late prehistoric agricultural societies. For example, the discovery that reliance upon maize as a dietary staple did not result invariably in poor health, as claimed by earlier studies, either for entire populations or, in ranked societies, for the non-elite majority, has fostered a new appreciation for the managerial wisdom of the Mississippian peoples, as well as for their agricultural skills.

 

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A valuable demonstration of how small, disparate populations or subpopulations can be productively utilized within a coherent analytical framework."
American Anthropologist
Booknews
Lively and entertaining, this memoir details Crick's early beginnings; his involvement in the discovery of DNA; how the story of DNA made it to the television screen; Crick's work in unraveling the genetic code; and his present involvement in neurobiology at the Salk Institute, where he has been affiliated since 1976. Addresses questions of human adaptation in a variety of cultural contexts, with a breadth not found in studies using solely biological or artifactual data. These nine case studies from eight southeastern states cover some 5,000 years of human habitation, from archaic hunter-gatherers in Louisiana and Alabama to colonial planters and slaves in South Carolina. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780817304843
Publisher:
University of Alabama Press
Publication date:
01/28/2003
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
248
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.70(d)

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