What Teachers Make: In Praise of the Greatest Job in the World [NOOK Book]

Overview

In praise of the greatest job in the world...

The right book at the right time: an impassioned defense of teachers and why we need them now more than ever.

Teacher turned teacher’s advocate Taylor Mali inspired millions with his original poem “What Teachers Make,” a passionate and unforgettable response ...
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What Teachers Make: In Praise of the Greatest Job in the World

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Overview

In praise of the greatest job in the world...

The right book at the right time: an impassioned defense of teachers and why we need them now more than ever.

Teacher turned teacher’s advocate Taylor Mali inspired millions with his original poem “What Teachers Make,” a passionate and unforgettable response to a rich man at a dinner party who sneeringly asked him what teachers make. Mali’s sharp, funny, perceptive look at life in the classroom pays tribute to the joys of teaching…and explains why teachers are so vital to our society.

What Teachers Make is a book that will be treasured and shared by every teacher in America—and everybody who’s ever loved or learned from one.

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  • May11_2/WHAT_TEACHERS_MAKE_by_Taylor_Mali_BB_0dd826528e41e616e88659407d56aa32f123046e
    May11_2/WHAT_TEACHERS_MAKE_by_Taylor_Mali_BB_0dd826528e41e616e88659407d56aa32f123046e  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
An insult from “an arrogant young lawyer” delivered to a prize-winning slam poet led to a work that was “copied and pasted and e-mailed around the world” and watched on YouTube by millions; this led Mali to become “a poet with a plan to improve the world one teacher at a time.” In vignettes from his peripatetic career as a middle school teacher (teaching variously English, history, and math, in locations as widespread as New York, London, Kansas, and Maine), and in interspersed poems, Mali recounts his experiences as teacher and pays tribute to those who taught him. Thoroughly anecdotal, his examples of lessons, activities, and projects are offered, not as patterns to be followed but modes of liberation for teachers. Part memoir, part encomium, this prose extension of the slam “What Teachers Make” keeps an eye on pedagogical usefulness, while eschewing a manual tone. Although occasionally treacly, the slammer in Mali keeps the work straightforward, fast-paced, and trenchant. Mali’s goal, “to convince one thousand people to become teachers,” formalized in his the New Teacher Project, finds an effective boost in this evocative small book bulging with a big idea—“to remind teachers that they are dearly loved.” (Apr.)
From the Publisher
"It's a breezy listen, with Mali's writing and Verner's delivery often taking on poetic qualities." —-AudioFile
Library Journal
A former middle school teacher and now a teacher advocate, Mali wrote a poem, "What Teachers Make," that has been viewed more than five million times on YouTube and was read at Yale's commencement by Thomas Friedman of the New York Times. The essays here, on teaching hard work and reaching a difficult student, for instance, were inspired by the poem. With everyone debating the real value of what teachers do, here's a heartfelt explanation. A crucial book on a crucial subject; get it for believers and doubters alike.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101577363
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/29/2012
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 200,120
  • File size: 251 KB

Meet the Author


Taylor Mali spent nine years in the classroom teaching everything from English and history to math and SAT test preparation. A vocal advocate for teachers and the nobility of teaching, he speaks around the world about teaching. He has a goal of creating new teachers for his Quest for One Thousand Teachers Project through the power of “poetry, persuasion, and perseverance.”



Visit him online at taylormali.com, facebook.com/TaylorMaliPoet, and twitter.com/TaylorMali.



 
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Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Making Kids Work Hard 9

Your Child Is My Student 15

A Poet Becomes a Teacher (and Vice Versa) 25

Calling Home 33

Lightbulb Moments and Happy Accidents 41

Definitely Beautiful 51

Keeping Your Eye Out for the Teachable Moment 57

In Praise of Thoughtful Uncertainty 65

Encountering Genius 73

The Student Becomes the Teacher 79

My Best Day as a Teacher 85

E-mail, Islam, and Enlightenment (Insha'allah) 91

Lessons You Can Touch 97

The Value of What You Cannot Test 105

No One Leaves My Class Early for Any Reason 111

My Bad (Apologize and Mean It!) 115

MEG: Mali's Electronic Grade Book 119

Teachers Make Technology Work! 127

Thinking It Through: The Timeline at the Back of the Classroom 133

What Teachers Get: Presents from Parents 139

Fighting Back Against the Attack on Teachers 145

Where Do the Best Teachers End Up? 155

The Importance of Mentoring 161

Teachers Who Made a Difference for Me 167

The Quest for One Thousand Teachers 177

There Can Never Be a "Lost" Generation 191

Epilogue 195

Acknowledgments 199

Note on Poems 201

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Interviews & Essays

Grateful Grads: Thanking Teachers

Taylor Mali

I grew up writing thank-you notes. Real, honest-to-goodness, pen-and-ink, stamped and posted letters. More than simple habit, it's about what the commitment to expressing your thoughts and feelings in writing says about the character of the writer. About the joy such notes bring to the reader. Creation of such happiness is enough rank writing thank-you notes as one of the most important things in life.

It has to do with gratitude. Being thankful for where and who you are today. Expressing that thanks to the people who helped you get there.
Teaching is a field peppered with unexpected rewards, like gratitude. Knowing what it is like to strive in this field, and what one word of thanks can mean to a teacher, I urge everyone this graduation season to thank his or her teachers.

In many ways, What Teachers Make: In Praise of the Greatest Job in the World is just one big thank-you note to my teachers. The book is dedicated to my fifth and sixth grade English teacher, Dr. Joseph D'Angelo, a massive force of erudition, martial artistry, culture, and love. It is a collection of learning experiences that made me who I am, and it documents teachers and students who taught me a lifetime of invaluable lessons.

But you do not have to write a book to say thank you. And although I hate to admit it, an actual letter really isn't necessary these days either. An e-mail or phone call will do. Or better yet, a heartfelt thanks at the upcoming ceremony. It makes a world of difference to a teacher. Almost better than a snow day.

When students have thanked me in the past for being their teacher, I have always felt that it was actually my love for the art of teaching they were speaking to. They weren't really telling me I was a great teacher so much as they were saying, "I can see that you love what you do, and that made it fun to be in your class. It was great to be taught by someone who didn't just view teaching as something they did, but who they were."

No graduation speaker will ever tell you that the future is anything but uncertain. It never is. But graduations need not only be obsessed with looking ahead; a graduation can be a day on which we turn back and trace our steps to see how we ended up where we are.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 8, 2012

    WHY IS THE NOOK BOOK MORE THAN THE HARDCOVER???

    WHY IS THE NOOK BOOK MORE THAN THE HARDCOVER???

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 11, 2013

    "He died with his sword in his hand and so went straight to

    "He died with his sword in his hand and so went straight to heaven."

    This book made me weep on many occasions while I read it, but no story so much as that of the Viking Warrior. These are the things that make teaching worthwhile.

    I love this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2012

    Read it to rememer why.

    If you are a teacher feeling the weight of your daily job, a college graduate subbing day in and day out wondering if you will ever have a room of your own, or just need a peek into the definity beautiful business of teaching then spend an hour or two and read this book. You will finish it refreshef and humbled and ready to face another day.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2012

    Thank you, Mr. Mali, for helping me find the strength to go on!

    Those you can, teach. Those who can't, legislate education reform!
    Bang on insight and comments from a teaching "insider", not just the usual claptrap from the people who think they know how to teach because they have kids or have spent less than five years trying to before they wash out or worse, become incompetent administratiors.
    Thank you, Mr. Mali, for giving me hope to go on in a system that continues to sabotage my best efforts, that does not recognise that NOT"everyone can teach", that promotes legislated, "teacher-proof" practices and encourages the deprofessionalizing of the teaching community!
    I will carry on!!!

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    Posted May 5, 2012

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    Posted December 27, 2012

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    Posted May 11, 2012

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    Posted March 29, 2012

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