What Teens Need to Succeed: Proven, Practical Ways to Shape Your Own Future

What Teens Need to Succeed: Proven, Practical Ways to Shape Your Own Future

by Peter L. Benson, Judy Galbraith, Pamela Espeland
     
 

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Some teens lead healthy, productive, positive lives. Others are troubled, self-destructive, and negative about themselves and the future. What makes the difference? The presence of specific assets in their lives—not financial assets, but Developmental Assets™ including family support, self-esteem, a caring school climate, adult role models, structured…  See more details below

Overview


Some teens lead healthy, productive, positive lives. Others are troubled, self-destructive, and negative about themselves and the future. What makes the difference? The presence of specific assets in their lives—not financial assets, but Developmental Assets™ including family support, self-esteem, a caring school climate, adult role models, structured time, and positive peer influence. It's a proven fact: The more Developmental Assets™ a young person has, the less likely he or she is to engage in at-risk behaviors.

Our best-selling book What Kids Need to Succeed tells parents, teachers, and community leaders how to build assets in young people. Now What Teens Need to Succeed inspires and empowers teens to build their own assets. It invites readers to identify the assets they already have and the ones they need, clearly describes the 40 assets identified as most essential, then gives hundreds of suggestions teens can use to develop the assets at home, at school, in the community, in the congregation, with friends, and with youth organizations.

"Assets in Action" sections show how people across the nation are creating healthy communities using the asset-building model. Resources point the way toward additional books, organizations, and Web sites.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Provides teens with information on how they can lay the foundations for rewarding lives.”—NEA Today
 

 “Engaging and interactive, not just a text to be read and put away on the shelf.”—Parenting for High Potential

"A useful resource for teens and those who work with them."—School Library Journal

"Read, America!" Selection

VOYA - Roxy Ekstrom
More books on how to parent and how to grow up? Yes, but--using surveys begun in 1989 and again in 1996, Search Institute, a nonprofit organization specializing in youth, wondered why some kids grow up easily while others struggle. They determined that the differences were strongly influenced by developmental assets. The more assets teens possess, the better they do in life. Teens build external assets grouped as support, empowerment, boundaries and expectations, and constructive use of time; and internal assets such as commitment to learning, positive values, social competencies, and positive identity, through interaction with adults who care. Both books have a similar organization, starting out with checklists for both parents and kids/teens. Each question in the checklist corresponds to an asset. Charts and graphs show the survey results. Each asset has its own chapter and is introduced by telling what percentage of teens surveyed have that asset. In What Kids Need to Succeed, bulleted suggestions are given for activities at home, at school, in the community, and in the congregation. All the ideas are positives, focusing on what to do, not what to correct. Most of the ideas are common sense: eat one meal together, during school conferences focus on the positive. But what sets this volume apart is the sheer number of suggestions, over nine hundred in all. Follow-up suggestions for the teens are a shortened version of the material from What Teens Need... resources for the home, school, and so forth are given at the end of the book. What Teens Need to Succeed is very user-friendly. The teen volume goes into much more detail, with over 1,200 ideas for building assets, quick "Assets in Action" notes, and hundreds of fascinating facts: "If you think adults don't value teens you're right." At the end of each chapter is a list of resources. These resources are pulled together in the bibliography, which includes Web sites. Robin, my teen reviewer, summed it up: "it has a lot of good advice for teens on how to deal with everyday situations, and how to help others as well. I would get this book for the valuable information it has in it and how they explain every way to succeed fully, without confusion." Even though much of the material in the two books is similar, they are not really interchangeable. Both volumes deserve a place in school and public libraries, as well as in many homes. Note: This review was written and published to address What Teens Need to Succeed: Proven Practical Ways to Shape Your Own Future and What Kids Need to Succeed: Proven, Practical Ways to Raise Good Kids. Index. Illus. Charts. Biblio. Further Reading. VOYA Codes: 4Q 3P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12).
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-Psychologist Benson and former teacher/counselor Galbraith based their writing on surveys of over 350,000 U.S. teens to provide a unique look at "positive assets"-good things that contribute to an individual's success in life. External assets include families, peers, spiritual support systems, schools, neighborhoods and their wider communities, while internal assets are defined as motivation, honesty, responsibility, decision-making skills, resistance skills, and more. Quotations from other Free Spirit self-help books and Search Institute findings are significant parts of this title, as are charts, graphs, quizzes, checklists, facts and statistics, illustrative and factual anecdotes, and myriad resources (Web sites, books, pamphlets, and contact organizations). Densely formatted, the typeface varies in size with lists, source notes, and bibliographic citations often reduced in size. A comprehensive index helps alleviate the sense of an overwhelming amount of information. A useful resource for teens and those who work with them.-Gail Richmond, San Diego Unified Schools, CA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781575420271
Publisher:
Free Spirit Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
06/15/1998
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 9.29(h) x 0.67(d)
Age Range:
11 - 17 Years

Meet the Author


Peter L. Benson, Ph.D., has been president of Search Institute since 1985. He received his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Denver, his M.A. in psychology from Yale, and his B.A. in psychology from Augustana College.

Judy Galbraith, M.A., has a master’s degree in guidance and counseling of the gifted. She has worked with and taught gifted children and teens, their parents, and their teachers for over 20 years. In 1983, she started Free Spirit Publishing, which specializes in Self-Help for Kids® and Self-Help for Teens® books and other learning materials.

Pamela Espeland has authored, coauthored, or edited over 200 books for Free Spirit Publishing on a variety of subjects. Pamela graduated from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota and currently lives in Minneapolis.

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