What-the-Dickens: The Story of a Rogue Tooth Fairy

( 127 )

Overview

"Gregory Maguire does for the dark and stormy night what he did for witches in Wicked." — The New York Times Book Review

A terrible storm is raging, and Dinah is huddled by candlelight with her brother, sister, and cousin Gage, who is telling a very unusual tale. It’s thestory of What-the-Dickens, a newly hatched orphan creature who finds he has an attraction to teeth, a crush on a cat named McCavity, and a penchant for getting into trouble. One day he happens upon a feisty girl...

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Overview

"Gregory Maguire does for the dark and stormy night what he did for witches in Wicked." — The New York Times Book Review

A terrible storm is raging, and Dinah is huddled by candlelight with her brother, sister, and cousin Gage, who is telling a very unusual tale. It’s thestory of What-the-Dickens, a newly hatched orphan creature who finds he has an attraction to teeth, a crush on a cat named McCavity, and a penchant for getting into trouble. One day he happens upon a feisty girl skibberee working as an Agent of Change — trading coins for teeth — and learns of a dutiful tribe of tooth fairies to which he hopes to belong. As his tale unfolds, however, both What-the-Dickens and Dinah come to see that the world is both richer and far less sure than they ever imagined.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
"A storm is as good a setting for a miracle as any." by the end of this tale about the Ormsbys and their cousin Gage, readers will be convinced that thunder is an omen and stories are kindling that enflames our imagination. Wicked author Gregory Maguire casts a magic candlelight spell about teeth, skittling creatures, and the need to believe.
From the Publisher
~TWILIGHT~

BY EVENING, WHEN THE WINDS ROSE yet again, the power began to stutter at half-strength, and the sirens to fail. From those streetlights whose bulbs hadn’t been stoned, a tea-colored dusk settled in uncertain tides. It fell on the dirty militias of pack dogs, all bullying and foaming against one another, and on the palm fronds twitching in the storm gutter, and on the abandoned cars, and everything — everything — was flattened, equalized in the gloom of half-light. Like the subjects in a browning photograph in some antique photo album, only these times weren’t antique. They were now.

The air seemed both oily and dry. If you rubbed your fingers together, a miser imagining a coin, your fingers stuck slightly.

A fug of smoke lay on the slopes above the deserted freeway. It might have reminded neighbors of campfire hours, but there were few neighbors around to notice. Most of them had gotten out while they still could.

Dinah could feel that everything was different, without knowing how or why. She wasn’t old enough to add up this column of facts:
- power cuts
- the smell of wet earth: mudslide surgically opening the hills
- winds like Joshua’s army battering the walls of Jericho
- massed clouds with poisonous yellow edges
- the evacuation of the downslope neighbors, and the silence and come up with a grown-up summary, like one or more of the following:
- the collapse of local government and services
- the collapse of public confidence, too
- state of emergency
- end of the world
- business as usual, just a variety of usual not usually seen.
After all, Dinah was only ten.

Ten, and in some ways, a youngish ten, because her family lived remotely.

For one thing, they kept themselves apart — literally. The Ormsbys sequestered themselves in a scrappy bungalow perched at the uphill end of the canyon, where the unpaved county road petered out into ridge rubble and scrub pine.

The Ormsbys weren’t rural castaways nor survivalists — nothing like that. They were trying the experiment of living by gospel standards, and they hoped to be surer of their faith tomorrow than they’d been yesterday.

A decent task and, around here, a lonely one. The Ormsby family made its home a citadel against the alluring nearby world of the Internet, the malls, the cable networks, and other such temptations.

The Ormsby parents called these attractions slick. They sighed and worried: dangerous. They feared cunning snares and delusions. Dinah Ormsby wished she could study such matters close-up and decide for herself.

Dinah and her big brother, Zeke, were homeschooled. This, they were frequently reminded, kept them safe, made them strong, and preserved their goodness. Since most of the time they felt safe, strong, and good, they assumed the strategy was working.

But all kids possess a nervy ability to dismay their parents, and the kids of the Ormsby family were no exception. Dinah saw life as a series of miracles with a fervor that even her devout parents considered unseemly.

"No, Santa Claus has no website staffed by underground Nordic trolls. No, there is no flight school for the training of apprentice reindeer. No to Santa Claus, period," her mother always said. "Dinah, honey, don’t let your imagination run away with you." Exasperatedly: "Govern yourself!"

"Think things through," said her dad, ever the peacemaker. "Big heart, big faith: great. But make sure you have a big mind, too. Use the brain God gave you."

Dinah took no offense, and she did try to think things through. From the Ormsby’s bunker, high above the threat of contamination by modern life, she could still love the world. In a hundred ways, a new way every day. Even a crisis could prove thrilling as it unfolded:
- Where, for instance, had her secret downslope friends gone? Just imagining their adventures on the road — with their normal, middle-class families — made Dinah happy. Or curious, anyway.
- For another instance: Just now, around the corner of the house, here comes the newcomer, Gage. A distant cousin of Dinah’s mom. A few days ago he had arrived on the bus for a rare visit and, presto. When the problems began to multiply and the result was a disaster, Gage had been right there, ready to help out as an emergency babysitter. Talk about timely — it was downright providential. How could you deny it?

Therefore, Dinah concluded,
- A storm is as good a setting for a miracle as any.

Of course, it would have been a little more miraculous if Gage had proven to be handy in a disaster, but Dinah wasn’t inclined to second-guess the hand of God. She would take any blessing that came along. Even if decent cousin Gage was a bit — she tried to face it, to use her good mind with honesty — ineffectual.

Hopeless at fixing anything. Clumsy with a screwdriver. Skittish with a used diaper. ("As a weather forecaster," Zeke mumbled to Dinah, "Gage is all wet: where is the clear sky, the sunlight he’s been promising?")

Yes, Gage Tavenner was a tangle of recklessly minor talents. Who needed a mandolin player when the electric power wouldn’t come on anymore?

But he was all they had, now. An adequate miracle so far.

"Zeke," Gage called, "get down from that shed roof ! Are you insane? We want another medical crisis?"

"I was trying to see where the power line was down. . . ."

"And fry yourself in the process? Power is out all over the county. Up there, if the winds get much stronger, you’ll be flown to your next destination without the benefit of an airplane. Down. Now. . . . "

***************
WHAT-THE-DICKENS by Gregory Maguire. Copyright (c) 2007 by Gregory Maguire. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

Elizabeth Ward
If not technically a Halloween tale, this romp from the author of Wicked has all the right props and cues…Then there's the pleasure of Maguire's dancing, silken prose.
—The Washington Post
VOYA - Mary Arnold
Set within a post-Katrina-like frame story, Maguire's layered tale illustrates how art and imagination help shape perceptions of reality. Ten-year-old Dinah and her family live purposely isolated from the allures of the twenty-first century, hoping to fortify their faith through a simple life. But when a terrible storm cuts them off from parents and rescue, Dinah and her siblings must rely on cousin Gage, who has proved himself only an "adequate miracle," to survive. Gage decides that a story will pass the time and ease fears. He introduces an orphan newborn, What-the-Dickens, trying to name the scary world he finds as he searches for a place to belong. Will it be with Mcavity the cat, old Granny Menace, or the skibbereens, a colony of tooth fairies? They do not want him either, but he hangs on through the adventure of helping Pepper "earn her wings" by trading coins for teeth. Dinah, Zeke, and baby Rebecca Ruth are not certain whether Gage's story will be enough of a distraction to relieve the fears and tensions around an uncertain future. It is just an act of imagination to stave off the dark-or is it? Not Maguire's first foray into fiction for a younger audience, this book grew from a short story, Gangster Teeth (Boston Globe, 2003). Readers also wonder what has stranded this family, and they empathize as the family members try to deal with the uncertainty and failure of trusted safety nets. The trauma and suffering of youngsters separated from safety, who find comfort and security through the power of story-the world of imagination feeling more real when unbearable reality makes one yearn to believe-gives shape to what might have been a light tale of a familiar conceit.
Children's Literature - Michele DeCamp
Gregory Maguire may have started out as a children's writer but he has made most of his living rethinking fairy tales for adult readers. He has tackled Oz, Cinderella and Snow White, and now he has stepped over into the Children's Section again with this fanciful take about who the real tooth fairy (or fairies as the book suggests) is. This novel is narrated by a young English teacher named Gage who is in charge of his cousins during a storm that has cut off their contact with the outside world. With starvation and despair drawing near, Gage tells a story about an orphan skibberee, a small fairy-like creature, named What-the-Dickens. As What-the-Dickens comes to terms with his species' calling as tooth fairies and candle growers, Gage and his cousins come to terms with what their own futures might hold if the children's parents do not survive the storm. While the descriptions of both the storm raging outside and What-the-Dicken's growing awareness of the world around him will draw readers in, Maguire tries to tackle too much in this story. Astute readers will not be sure what to make of his allusions to the children's overly religious parents, the apparent destruction of much of the United States resulting in a natural disaster of epic proportions, or the skibbereen's ant-like society where only important skibbereen are allowed to have names. Perhaps Maguire is channeling himself through Gage when the latter tells his young cousin Dinah, "I've been thinking of telling a story like that sometime, but I never had the chance to put it together before." Maguire may have wanted to break back into children's writing with this novel, but the tone and seriousness of someof the plot points show that he still works best for adults. Reviewer: Michele DeCamp
School Library Journal

Gr 4-6 -In Gregory Maguirea€™s fantasy (Candlewick, 2007), siblings Zeke, Dinah, and Rebecca Ruth are stranded in their home during a cataclysmic storm along with their cousin/babysitter Gage. To pass time and distract the children, Gage tells them a story of What-the-Dickens, a tooth fairy, and his search for identity and belonging. Although hatched alone in an old tuna can, What-the-Dickens discovers that he is one of the skibbereen who normally live in large groups. He meets Pepper, a probationary a€œagent of change,a€ who introduces him to her colony of skibbereen. He learns about their history, hierarchy, and function but ultimately decides not to join them, so he and Pepper set out on their own. As the story and night progress, the familya€™s dynamics play out as the children scrounge food, plan to celebrate Rebecca Rutha€™s second birthday, and elude the attempt of the emergency services to evacuate them to a shelter. Listeners are left with no more certainty about their future than that of What-the-Dickens and Pepper, although there is the sense that both the fairy and human characters will be fine. The author encourages listeners to explore the interplay between story and reality as well as the causative power of stories. Jason Culpa€™s understated narration gives subtle and appropriate voices to the characters. In the review copy, there was an editing glitch on disc 4 in which text was repeated. A good choice for young fantasy lovers.-Louise L. Sherman, formerly Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ

Kirkus Reviews
When a terrible storm (think Katrina) strands an inept young man with his highly sheltered cousins, he turns to storytelling to hold their fears at bay. What-the-Dickens is the protagonist of his story within the story; he is an orphaned skibberee (tooth fairy), and his search to belong is both poignant and humorous. From the start, What-the-Dickens attempts to find connections in a frightening world, and he repeatedly fails-such as his initial connection to a cat that would rather eat him-but he doesn't stop. When he does find other skibberee, his independent thinking nearly brings down the entire skibberee hierarchy, and he must flee with his one ally. The quirky humor is threaded with darker themes of loneliness and loss. While more mature than Maguire's Hamlet Chronicles, this bears the same hallmarks, including skillful use of language-precise, delightful turns of phrase and a conversational tone that perfectly enhances the subtext on the importance of storytelling. The endings for both the frame story and What-the-Dickens are happy, but not unalloyed. Overall, a winner for Maguire's fans of all ages. (Fantasy. 8-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763643072
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 3/24/2009
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 385,192
  • Lexile: 710L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 4.20 (w) x 6.70 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Gregory Maguire

Gregory Maguire is the author of more than a dozen novels for children as well as four adult novels, including WICKED: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF THE WICKED WITCH OF THE WEST, which was made into a hit Broadway musical. He lives outside Boston, Massachusetts.

Biography

Raised in a family of writers (his father was a journalist and his stepmother a poet), Gregory Maguire grew up with a great love of books, especially fairy tales and fantasy fiction. He composed his own stories from an early age and released his first book for children, The Lightning Time, in 1978, just two years after graduating from the State University of New York at Albany.

Several other children's book followed, but major recognition eluded Maguire. Then, in 1995, he published his first adult novel. A bold, revisionist view of Frank L. Baum's classic Oz stories, Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West places one of literature's most reviled characters at the center of a dark dystopian fantasy and raises provocative questions about the very nature of good and evil. Purists criticized Maguire for tampering with a beloved juvenile classic, but the book received generally good reviews (John Updike, writing in The New Yorker, proclaimed it "an amazing novel.") and the enthusiasm of readers catapulted it to the top of the bestseller charts. (Maguire's currency increased even further when the book was turned into the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical Wicked in 2003.)

In the wake of his breakthrough novel, Maguire has made something of a specialty out of turning classic children's tales on their heads. He retold the legends of Cinderella and Snow White in Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister (1999) and Mirror, Mirror (2003); he raised the ghost of Ebenezer Scrooge in Lost (2001); and, in 2005, he returned to Oz for Son of a Witch, the long-awaited sequel to Wicked. He has reviewed fantasy fiction for the Sunday New York Times Book Review and has contributed his own articles, essays, and stories to publications like Ploughshares, The Boston Review, the Christian Science Monitor, and The Horn Book Magazine.

In addition, Maguire has never lost his interest in -- or enthusiasm for -- children's literature. He is the author of The Hamlet Chronicles, a bestselling seven-book series of high-camp mystery-adventures with silly count-down titles like Seven Spiders Spinning and Three Rotten Eggs. He has taught at the Center for the Study of Children's Literature at Simmons College and is a founding member of Children's Literature New England (CLNE), a nonprofit organization that focuses attention on the significance of literature in the lives of children.

Good To Know

In our interview, Maguire shared some fun facts with us about his life:

"While I pride myself on trying to be creative in all areas of my life, I have occasionally gone overboard, like the time I decided to bring to a party a salad that I constructed, on a huge rattan platter, to look like a miniature scale model of the Gardens of Babylon. I built terraces with chunks of Monterey jack, had a forest of broccoli florets and a lagoon of Seven Seas salad dressing spooned into a half a honeydew melon. I made reed patches out of scallion tips and walkways out of sesame seeds lined with raisin borders. Driving to the party, I had to brake to avoid a taxi, and by the time the police flagged me down for poor driving skills I was nearly weeping. ‘But Officer, I have a quickly decomposing Hanging Gardens of Babylon to deliver....' Everything had slopped and fallen over and it looked like a tray of vegetable garbage."

"My first job was scooping ice cream at Friendly's in Albany, New York. I hated the work, most of my colleagues, and the uniform, and I more or less lost my taste for ice cream permanently."

"If I hadn't been a writer, I would have tried to be one of the following: An artist (watercolors), a singer/songwriter like Paul Simon (taller but not very much more), an architect (domestic), a teacher. Actually, in one way or another I have done all of the above, but learned pretty quickly that my skills needed more honing for me to charge for my services, and I'd always rather write fiction than hone skills."

"I steal a bit from one of my favorite writers to say, simply, that I enjoy, most of all, old friends and new places. I love to travel. Having small children at home now impedes my efforts a great deal, but I have managed in my time to get to Asia, Africa, most of Europe, and Central America. My wish list of places not yet visited includes India, Denmark, Brazil, and New Zealand, and my wish for friends not yet made includes, in a sense, readers who are about to discover my work, either now or even when I'm no longer among the living. In a sense, in anticipation, I value those friends in a special way."

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    1. Hometown:
      Boston, Massachusetts
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 9, 1954
    2. Place of Birth:
      Albany, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A., SUNY at Albany, 1976; M.A., Simmons College, 1978; Ph.D., Tufts University, 1990
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

BY EVENING, WHEN THE WINDS ROSE yet again, the power began to stutter at half-strength, and the sirens to fail. From those streetlights whose bulbs hadn't been stoned, a tea-colored dusk settled in uncertain tides. It fell on the dirty militias of pack dogs, all bullying and foaming against one another, and on the palm fronds twitching in the storm gutter, and on the abandoned cars, and everything - everything - was flattened, equalized in the gloom of half-light. Like the subjects in a browning photograph in some antique photo album, only these times weren't antique. They were now.

The air seemed both oily and dry. If you rubbed your fingers together, a miser imagining a coin, your fingers stuck slightly.

A fug of smoke lay on the slopes above the deserted freeway. It might have reminded neighbors of campfire hours, but there were few neighbors around to notice. Most of them had gotten out while they still could.

Dinah could feel that everything was different, without knowing how or why. She wasn't old enough to add up this column of facts:

- power cuts
- the smell of wet earth: mudslide surgically opening the hills
- winds like Joshua's army battering the walls of Jericho
- massed clouds with poisonous yellow edges
- the evacuation of the downslope neighbors, and the silence

and come up with a grown-up summary, like one or more of the following:

- the collapse of local government and services
- the collapse of public confidence, too
- state of emergency
- end of the world
- business as usual, just a variety of usual not usually seen.

After all, Dinah was only ten. Ten, and in some ways, a youngish ten, because her family lived remotely. For one thing, they kept themselves apart - literally. The Ormsbys sequestered themselves in a scrappy bungalow perched at the uphill end of the canyon, where the unpaved county road petered out into ridge rubble and scrub pine.

The Ormsbys weren't rural castaways nor survivalists - nothing like that. They were trying the experiment of living by gospel standards, and they hoped to be surer of their faith tomorrow than they'd been yesterday.

A decent task and, around here, a lonely one. The Ormsby family made its home a citadel against the alluring nearby world of the Internet, the malls, the cable networks, and other such temptations.

The Ormsby parents called these attractions slick. They sighed and worried: dangerous. They feared cunning snares and delusions. Dinah Ormsby wished she could study such matters close-up and decide for herself.

Dinah and her big brother, Zeke, were homeschooled. This, they were frequently reminded, kept them safe, made them strong, and preserved their goodness. Since most of the time they felt safe, strong, and good, they assumed the strategy was working.

But all kids possess a nervy ability to dismay their parents, and the kids of the Ormsby family were no exception. Dinah saw life as a series of miracles with a fervor that even her devout parents considered unseemly.
"No, Santa Claus has no website staffed by underground Nordic trolls. No, there is no flight school for the training of apprentice reindeer. No to Santa Claus, period," her mother always said. "Dinah, honey, don't let your imagination run away with you." Exasperatedly: "Govern yourself!"

"Think things through," said her dad, ever the peacemaker. "Big heart, big faith: great. But make sure you have a big mind, too. Use the brain God gave you."

Dinah took no offense, and she did try to think things through. From the Ormsby's bunker, high above the threat of contamination by modern life, she could still love the world. In a hundred ways, a new way every day. Even a crisis could prove thrilling as it unfolded:

- Where, for instance, had her secret downslope friends gone? Just imagining their adventures on the road - with their normal, middle-class families - made Dinah happy. Or curious, anyway.

- For another instance: Just now, around the corner of the house, here comes the newcomer, Gage. A distant cousin of Dinah's mom. A few days ago he had arrived on the bus for a rare visit and, presto. When the problems began to multiply and the result was a disaster, Gage had been right there, ready to help out as an emergency babysitter. Talk about timely - it was downright providential. How could you deny it?

Therefore, Dinah concluded,
- A storm is as good a setting for a miracle as any.

Of course, it would have been a little more miraculous if Gage had proven to be handy in a disaster, but Dinah wasn't inclined to second-guess the hand of God. She would take any blessing that came along. Even if decent cousin Gage was a bit - she tried to face it, to use her good mind with honesty - ineffectual.

Hopeless at fixing anything. Clumsy with a screwdriver. Skittish with a used diaper. ("As a weather forecaster," Zeke mumbled to Dinah, "Gage is all wet: where is the clear sky, the sunlight he's been promising?")

Yes, Gage Tavenner was a tangle of recklessly minor talents. Who needed a mandolin player when the electric power wouldn't come on anymore?

But he was all they had, now. An adequate miracle so far.

"Zeke," Gage called, "get down from that shed roof! Are you insane? We want another medical crisis?"

"I was trying to see where the power line was down. . . ."

"And fry yourself in the process? Power is out all over the county. Up there, if the winds get much stronger, you'll be flown to your next destination without the benefit of an airplane. Down. Now. And Dinah, get Rebecca Ruth off that picnic table before it blows over. I'm going to make another go at jump-starting the generator."

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 127 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(37)

4 Star

(34)

3 Star

(33)

2 Star

(10)

1 Star

(13)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 127 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2010

    Yawn!

    Seems as though Gregory Maguire hasn't had a really good read since Wicked. From the first page of this book it was a downhill slope of boring. I would definitely leave this book on the shelf. Nice cover work, though.

    7 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Very cute, great book!

    I really enjoyed this book! It's the story of the tooth fairy...sort of... It's the story of A tooth fairy...a rogue tooth fairy.

    This is actually two stories in one. There is the story of a group of children trapped in a house after a huge storm, with no food or electricity, and there is the story they are telling about the rogue tooth fairy in order to forget about their situation.

    Greogry Maguire doesn't disappoint.

    I will say, keep going, it does get better as you get into the story. There are a few characters to remember at the beginning, so don't get discouraged. If you stick it out it'll be WELL worth it.

    I hope there's a second book because I really wanted more at the end.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Cute book

    It's better to read in one sitting. If you liked how City of Ember read, you'll like this.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Great book!

    I love this book. It's awesome. I'm 12 and I LOVE LOVE it. It may SEEM childish, yet it's not. Read it if you see it, have it, a friend has it, borrow it, do anything to read it. What-the-Dickens is awesome. There really should be a sequel to it. Unless there is one... Anyways, great book read it if you get the chance!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Please, buy one of these copies in hardcover, or paperback. Great book!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (Each different prices. Goes from expensive, to cheap.) Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2008

    A reviewer

    When I first saw this book, I wanted to read it desperately. I thought the cover looked good, and it seemed interesting at first, but when I borrowed it from my local library.... I read the first few chapters, and had to close it for good. In my opinion, it was very boring and not very well written. It seemed to be...dull. I thought it would've been better, but it wasnt. Sorry if I hurt anyone's feelings - I'm just writting my opinion down.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2008

    Best Book I've Read in a While

    This is an excellent book, with great characters and great images. The plot of the story, and the story in the story, are fenomenal. I loved this book. :)

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2007

    A reviewer

    As an avid Gregory Maguire reader...this stands up to all we've come to expect from him! Wonderful for children and adults alike - read it alone or with your children, you'll enjoy every word!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 11, 2011

    It had its moments

    When I first read the summary for this book and saw the cover it looked entertaining and interesting. It wasn't quite what I was hoping for though. I am not sure I liked the 2 stories going on with the stranded kids and then the actual story of the tooth fairy. Some of it came off as cheesy and I just couldn't enjoy or become attached to any of the characters. I have to say of the few books of Maguire's I've read, I still like Wicked the best.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Not your grandma's tooth fairy

    First, let me re-acknowledge that Maguire is not for everyone. This book continues that trend.

    The overall concept sounds fairly airy and fun but at its heart, it's a lot darker than you might imagine.

    There are two story threads going on throughout the novel and each one is very intriguing. The threads sometimes intertwine and even when they don't directly touch, you find yourself wondering about the balance between the two.

    The story arc of the fairy creatures is highly imaginative and really a lot of fun. The reader is placed directly alongside other characters in the novel who are "hearing" the fairy tale at the same time that we're reading it. This juxtaposition of character and reader truly helps bring the reader into the second story arc and relate to the turmoil going on.

    The second story arc, that of the children in the midst of a violent storm, is not entirely spelled out and leaves a lot to the reader's insight and imagination. I really enjoyed this aspect of the novel...the fact that Maguire trusts his readers to be smart enough to read between the line and to develop the characters and situations of the "real world" rather than rely on him to spell out every little detail.

    The themes of hope, imagination and a world spoiled by adult influence are all presented very well. But it never feels like Maguire is preaching to us or standing on a soap box condemning the adults and unimaginative pessimists of the world. Rather, he is exploring the hopes and dreams of children even within bleak circumstances.

    This isn't a fairy tale you should read when you're looking for a pick-me-up, but it's definitely something I'd recommend to those looking for a thought provoking story and entertaining writing.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2007

    Two stories in one

    This is a story of a babysitting cousin telling a story to his stranded charges. The told story of the rogue tooth fairy is very imaginative with great characters a real page turner. The external story of the stranded kids is a bit cheesy and predictable, and uses sterotyped characters. But, it's still a very good read and memorable.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2012

    A struggle

    A good book, but it took awhile to actually get into it. I love his other books. This one was kind of disappointing

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Great book

    I loved this wonderful farytail I would reccomend it to anyone

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Quirky and delightful.

    I love the way Mr. Maguire's mind works! This book was chock-full of unexpected (yet vaguely familiar) images and characters. I found myself thinking--more than once--"I thought so!" Full of energy and emotion, this is a delicious adventure into what might be going on right under your feet: challenging bigotry, forgiveness, hope, and life unresolved. I loved it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 23, 2011

    Delightful, highly recommended for all ages.

    Gregory Maguire is without any question a highly talented writer. This book was different from all the other books I have read of his but I found it capturing. I wanted to know what was going on in both of the stories within the story but held on to the story at hand just the same. I had to know the endings. Gregory did a wonderful job keeping my attention.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2014

    Clever!

    As with all of the books by Maguire I have read, this show a really different take on what you thought you knew. My only complaint is I wanted more- it ended far too soon for my tastes.

    So now I have more information on the tooth fairy tribe, fairies in general (and I must say, the way they are presented makes sense to me) and opened up a whole new thought process for me. I will never look at fairies the same way again!

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  • Posted February 16, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    A fairy, just born, without any mother or father goes through so

    A fairy, just born, without any mother or father goes through some of life’s roller coaster in just a few days.  Confused about his name (What-The-Dickens) and role in life.  The fairy comes across many unique characters including another tooth fairy.




     I enjoyed this more than I thought I would since I have only read one other Maguire book and it was not Wicked or another in the Wicked series.  What The Dickens’ story is unique and action packed.  In some instances you forget the that the fairy’s story is a story within a story.   The fairy’s tale is being told by Gabe a babysitter of 3 children that are stuck in the children’s home without electricity and not much food.  Not much food insinuates they have been stuck within the home for days.  Both stories are interesting and grab you.  




     With both stories, the story of Gabe babysitting and the story that Gabe is telling,  are so interesting that you leave with more questions.  Even though there are still some questions unanswered  the stories keep the pace interesting and imaginative.




     I would like to see more written on What-The-Dickens, the character.  He starts as most of us do which is young, gullible,  and take things literally.  Gregory Maguire’s writing in this book is excellent and has me wanting to read other books by him. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2013

    Bios

    Bios

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2013

    Lionpaw bio.

    Lionpaw is the one ho started the protecters with rockstar. He is a large brown tom(( hence the name the brown tom)) with blue eyes. His code name is the brown tom. He has fur around his neck like a mane. He is shrewd and incredablly witty. He is also agile and fast. He knows herbs well.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2013

    Ddddd

    Prank prankprankprank!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2012

    cks

    light fun

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