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What the No-Good Baby Is Good For
     

What the No-Good Baby Is Good For

4.0 1
by Elise Broach, Abby Carter (Translator)
 
For any child with a no-good baby in their house, Broach offers up acompletely unique solution to the new sibling problem.

The No-Good Baby has been at John's house for months and months, and more than half a year. She sleeps and cries at all the wrong times. She's messy and loud and ruins everything.

�That no-good baby is good for nothing,� John

Overview

For any child with a no-good baby in their house, Broach offers up acompletely unique solution to the new sibling problem.

The No-Good Baby has been at John's house for months and months, and more than half a year. She sleeps and cries at all the wrong times. She's messy and loud and ruins everything.

�That no-good baby is good for nothing,� John tells his mother. �It is time for her to go.�

�I guess you're right,� says John's mother, and they start packing her bags.

Author Biography: Elise Broach lives in Easton, Connecticut. Abby Carter lives in Hadlyme, Connecticut. Her book Slithery Jake was read on National Public Radio by Daniel Pinkwater.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Any pre-schooler with a baby in the house will readily identify with John's problem. It seems the new baby has stayed for "weeks and weeks, and months and months, and more than half of a year" and John is just plain tired of it. He enumerates all of the baby's annoying behaviors and is surprised when his mother agrees with him that the baby must go. As they pack her suitcase, John suddenly realizes that the baby is good for a few things. She pulls the cat's tail so the cat likes him best, she makes so much noise at the library that she is even louder than him, and when they have a race, John always wins. As the suitcase is closed and he kisses his baby sister good-bye, John has second thoughts. Maybe she should not go away forever but just for a day so John and his mom can have a special time. A beaming grandmother is delighted to have the baby all to herself and John and mom look forward to time alone. This very real slice-of—life vignette is not doubt played out in homes everyday. Here a very savvy mom allows her son to vent knowing full well how real his frustrations are. Vibrant watercolor illustrations humorously show the pesky but oh-so-cute baby eating the playing cards, gleefully making a mess with the laundry, and with wild abandon enjoying the books at the library. It is too bad the librarian depicted fits the stern, stereotypical image. The hesitation with which John is ready to let her go quietly shows the depth of his affection. This warm and cheery tale will be a sure-fire hit with moms and dads, too. 2005, Putnam's, Ages 3 to 6.
—Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-After his baby sister has been at his house for several months, John decides that it is time for her to go. He is tired of sharing and being quiet during naps. His mother agrees, and they begin packing the tot's suitcase. As they work, John thinks of ways in which his sibling's no-good behavior can be good: for example, she is noisy, but that is useful at the library because she is louder than he is. Eventually, they decide that she is good for "quite a lot," and should only go to Grandma's for the day. The story is touching, funny, and honest. While most titles on this topic focus on the first few days after a newborn's arrival, this one looks at the continuing adjustment of older siblings and gently reminds parents to find special time together without the newcomer. The stereotypical portrayal of the librarian is the one disappointment in an otherwise rollicking tale. Sitting behind a desk, sporting a frizzy bun and half-moon glasses, she scowls at the baby's noisy enjoyment of the library. Still, the watercolor illustrations capture the text's warm, lighthearted tone and keep the visual focus on John and his sister. The boy's frustration at his sibling's actions comes across clearly, as do his mixed emotions when he thinks she may stay at Grandma's forever. A quality title that will resonate with older brothers and sisters everywhere.-Suzanne Myers Harold, Multnomah County Library System, Portland, OR Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399238772
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/28/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.25(w) x 10.25(h) x 0.31(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Elise Broach lives with her family in rural Connecticut, where she writes books for children and teens, including When Dinosaurs Came With Everything, Shakespeare's Secret and Wet Dog!, and serves in town government. Visit Elise at www.elisebroach.com.

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What the No-Good Baby Is Good For 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Autumn2 More than 1 year ago
This is a cute book about a young boy who is tired of his little sister and wants her to go away. Sounds like in my house with K and his sister A. The mother goes along with okay she can go, but she made him tell her about the good things of having his sister there. That is what I thought was a good thing to do. So for every negative thing the brother had to say there was also something positive.  The only thing that was bothersome for me was the constant repeating of the no-good baby, though after a while it just kind of rolled off the tongue. The illustrations are cute and this would be a good book for those that are expecting a new baby to come into the house to prepare for what could happen when you have a new little one.  The behavior the no-good baby does isn't very good behavior so I wouldn't recommend this book to the younger kids as they may think this behavior is okay.