What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School: 299 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career

Overview

Reviews of the first edition:
“Filled with enough advice to help keep one engaged and productive for an entire academic career.”?The Journal of Scholarly Publishing

“We plan to buy one of these for each of our incoming faculty and doctoral students. Take a look. It’s a wonderful read.”?The Review of Higher Education

"This manual's strength is in the crisp, straightforward tips on subjects ranging from how to handle students who may present a physical danger to how to navigate ...

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What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School: 299 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career

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Overview

Reviews of the first edition:
“Filled with enough advice to help keep one engaged and productive for an entire academic career.”?The Journal of Scholarly Publishing

“We plan to buy one of these for each of our incoming faculty and doctoral students. Take a look. It’s a wonderful read.”?The Review of Higher Education

"This manual's strength is in the crisp, straightforward tips on subjects ranging from how to handle students who may present a physical danger to how to navigate new technology for better teaching, research and writing. It is presented with a clever wit [and] includes a chapter on diversity that is brief and blunt."?Black Issues in Higher Education (now Diverse)

• This irreverent, but serious guide to what life in higher education institutions is really like, now enhanced by 100 new tips
• Invaluable advice that ranges from getting your Ph.D. to setting the course of your academic career

The 100 new hints expand sections on the dissertation process, job hunting, life in the classroom and on dealing with students, as well as on matters that affect readers’ careers, such as research, publication, and tenure. The book concludes with a tongue-in-cheek appendix on How to Become a Millionaire while an academic.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School is exactly what it claims to be: a collection of tips and hints that are rarely part of graduate education and yet are essential to survival in academic life, no matter what stage or discipline. Gray and Drew share their experiences teaching, publishing, and navigating institutional bureaucracy in a way that is highly readable and uniquely informative. This book would find a welcome place on any your scholar's shelf."

"Authors, Paul Gray and David E. Drew’s (2012) text is a well written, excellent read, that is insightful for those who are in the process of starting their academic career. From the start to finish, they provide the reader with a lot of useful tips to help one be more savvy and keen as an academic. Readers should enjoy this book because it is well organized and structured. Additionally, the chapters and hints are laid out in a way that is easy and pleasurable to read. The authors do a good job of describing terms and breaking larger concepts into smaller sections or over several tips to allow for the reader to get a better grasp of the overall ideas put forth. They also write in a clear, concise and, more importantly, a direct manner. In essence, Gray and Drew do not try to stump you, nor do they try to act as if they are leading experts. Rather, they sincerely convey their thoughts based upon their experiences as professors. The topics covered in this book are essential and useful because they walk you through several stages of what it takes to have a successful academic career, such as ways to complete your dissertation and effectively publish to working through your first job search and colleague relations. That said, if you are considering a career in the professoriate or currently in a PhD program, and would like a few helpful hints please consider reading this text."

“Filled with enough advice to help keep one engaged and productive for an entire academic career.”

“We plan to buy one of these for each of our incoming faculty and doctoral students. Take a look. It’s a wonderful read.”

"This manual's strength is in the crisp, straightforward tips on subjects ranging from how to handle students who may present a physical danger to how to navigate new technology for better teaching, research and writing. It is presented with a clever wit [and] includes a chapter on diversity that is brief and blunt."

"The second updated edition of What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School: 299 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career includes a hundred new tips and keys to success in obtaining a PhD, and covers everything from the underlying rules of academic life to the dissertation process, job hunting, and dealing with students. From those who are students to those who have just landed their first faculty position but still strive for their PhDs, this is packed with clear directions and insights not to be missed!"

Mary Hamner
"What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School is exactly what it claims to be: a collection of tips and hints that are rarely part of graduate education and yet are essential to survival in academic life, no matter what stage or discipline. Gray and Drew share their experiences teaching, publishing, and navigating institutional bureaucracy in a way that is highly readable and uniquely informative. This book would find a welcome place on any your scholar's shelf."
NACADA - Derrick Gunter
"Authors, Paul Gray and David E. Drew’s (2012) text is a well written, excellent read, that is insightful for those who are in the process of starting their academic career. From the start to finish, they provide the reader with a lot of useful tips to help one be more savvy and keen as an academic. Readers should enjoy this book because it is well organized and structured. Additionally, the chapters and hints are laid out in a way that is easy and pleasurable to read. The authors do a good job of describing terms and breaking larger concepts into smaller sections or over several tips to allow for the reader to get a better grasp of the overall ideas put forth. They also write in a clear, concise and, more importantly, a direct manner. In essence, Gray and Drew do not try to stump you, nor do they try to act as if they are leading experts. Rather, they sincerely convey their thoughts based upon their experiences as professors. The topics covered in this book are essential and useful because they walk you through several stages of what it takes to have a successful academic career, such as ways to complete your dissertation and effectively publish to working through your first job search and colleague relations. That said, if you are considering a career in the professoriate or currently in a PhD program, and would like a few helpful hints please consider reading this text."
The Journal of Scholarly Publishing
“Filled with enough advice to help keep one engaged and productive for an entire academic career.”
The Review of Higher Education
“We plan to buy one of these for each of our incoming faculty and doctoral students. Take a look. It’s a wonderful read.” Dennis E. Gregory
Black Issues in Higher Education
"This manual's strength is in the crisp, straightforward tips on subjects ranging from how to handle students who may present a physical danger to how to navigate new technology for better teaching, research and writing. It is presented with a clever wit [and] includes a chapter on diversity that is brief and blunt."
California Bookwatch
"The second updated edition of What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School: 299 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career includes a hundred new tips and keys to success in obtaining a PhD, and covers everything from the underlying rules of academic life to the dissertation process, job hunting, and dealing with students. From those who are students to those who have just landed their first faculty position but still strive for their PhDs, this is packed with clear directions and insights not to be missed!"
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781579226442
  • Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC
  • Publication date: 1/28/2012
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 695,279
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Laurie Richlin

Steadman Upham is president of The University of Tulsa. Among former positions, he was vice provost for research and dean of the graduate school, as well as professor of anthropology, at the University of Oregon; and chairman of the Board of Directors of the Council of Graduate Schools.

Matthew Henry Hall is a cartoonist whose work appears in Readers Digest, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Adjunct Advocate, and many other publications, including the the "Teachable Moments" column of Inside Higher Ed.

Paul Gray was Professor Emeritus and Founding Chair of Information Science at Claremont Graduate University. He specialized in information systems, particularly decision support systems, knowledge management, data warehousing and electronic commerce.

David E. Drew holds the Joseph B. Platt Chair and previously served as dean of the CGU School of Educational Studies. He is a sociologist who applies quantitative and qualitative techniques, especially multivariate models, in studying the effectiveness of organizations.

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Table of Contents

Foreword 1 to the First Edition by Laurie Richlin
Foreword 2 to the First Edition by Steadman Upham
Introduction

CHAPTER ONE: BASIC CONCEPTS

CHAPTER TWO: THE PhD

CHAPTER THREE: THE DISSERTATION

CHAPTER FOUR: JOB HUNTING

CHAPTER FIVE: TEACHING

CHAPTER SIX: RESEARCH

CHAPTER SEVEN: TENURE

CHAPTER EIGHT: ACADEMIC RANK

CHAPTER NINE: YOUR FINANCIAL LIFE AS AN ACADEMIC

CHAPTER TEN: LIFE AS AN ACADEMIC

CHAPTER ELEVEN: DIVERSITY

CHAPTER TWELVE: ON WRITING

CHAPTER THIRTEEN: ON PUBLISHING

CHAPTER FOURTEEN: PERSONAL CONSIDERATIONS

CHAPTER FIFTEEN: FINAL THOUGHTS

CHAPTER SIXTEEN:CONCLUSION AND ENVOI

APPENDICES
APPENDIX A:MECHANICS OF THE DISSERTATION
APPENDIX B: OUTSIDE INCOME
APPENDIX C:HOW TO BECOME A MILLIONAIRE
APPENDIX D: WRITING HINTS
APPENDIX E: YOUR HEALTH

About the Authors

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